News Posts matching "TIM"

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Intel Core i7 8700K Reportedly Reaches 4.8 GHz Easily, 5 GHz+ Requires Delid

A report out of Expreview says that users should expect Intel's 8700K 6-core processor to easily clock up to 4.8 GHz with conventional cooling methods. Apparently, the chip doesn't even need that much voltage to achieve this feat either; however, thermal constraints are quickly hit when pushing Intel's latest (upcoming) leader for the mainstream desktop parts. Expreview says that due to the much increased temperatures, users who want to eke out the most performance from their CPU purchase will likely have to try and resort to delidding of their 8700K. While that likely wouldn't have been necessary with Intel's 7700K processors, remember that here we have two extra CPU cores drawing power and producing waste heat, so it makes sense that thermals will be a bigger problem.

This is understandable: Intel is still using their much chagrined (and divisive) TIM as a heat conductor between the CPU die and the CPU's IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader), which has been proven to be a less than adequate way of conducting said heat. However, we all knew this would be the case; remember that Intel's HEDT HCC processors also feature this TIM, and in that case, we're talking of up to 18-core processors that can cost up to $1,999 - if Intel couldn't be bothered to spend the extra cents for actual solder as an interface material there, they certainly wouldn't do so here. As with almost all peeks at as of yet unreleased products, take this report (particularly when it comes to frequencies, as each CPU overclocks differently) with a grain of salt, please.

Source: Expreview

Intel's Skylake-X, Kaby Lake-X HEDT CPUs to use TIM; Won't be Soldered

If you had your eyes on those new Intel HEDT processors, which were posted just today with some... Interesting... price-points, you'll be a little miffed to know that Intel has gone on and done it again. The few cents per unit that soldering the CPU would add to the manufacturing costs of Intel's HEDT processors (starting at $999, tray-friendly prices) could definitely bring the blue giant to the red. As such, the company has decided to do away with solder even on its HEDT line of high-performance, eye-wateringly-expensive CPUs in favor of their dreaded TIM.

The news have been confirmed by der8auer, a renowned overclocker. And as you have probably seen in our own VSG's review (and if you haven't shame on you and click that link right away), delidding Intel's CPU's and ridding them of their TIM can improve temperatures by up to a staggering 21 ºC (case in point, an i7-7700K). And that's a quad-core CPU; imagine an Intel Core i9-7980XE 18-core processor sitting under that TIM, and overclocking it to boot. Those are more than four times the cores under an equally bad thermal interface; add to that the likely presence of a thermally-insulating air-gap, and you can imagine where this is going. If you are planning on going for Intel's HEDT platform, you better take those delidding tools off your shelf.

Update: Check this video here for some more information. Turns out both Skylake-X and Kaby Lake-X will make use of the referred TIM, but Skylake-X dies, which make use of a stacked PCB, won't be deliddable with current tools. A new tool is going to be developed by der8auer alongside ASUS for these chips.

Source: Overclock 3D

Temperature Spikes Reported on Intel's Core i7-7700, i7-7700K Processors

Reports around the web (and posts on Intel's forums) speak in hushed, strained and horrified voices at how some users with Intel's Core i7-7700 processors are seeing strangely random temperature spikes on their processors, which prompts their cooling solutions to spin to the rescue. The report only mentions Intel's 7700 (non-K) processor; though it would seem this issue is more prone to happen with the K version of the processor, according to Intel's forums.

Apparently, some users are seeing temperature spikes that reach as high as as high as 90°C (out of a recommended 100ºC.) Some users even go as far as admitting to have replaced Intel's fabled TIM, and running the CPU under a water cooling solution, only to find those temperature spikes still happening - and their cooling solutions rev up in response. "My own chip suffers from it, (without any overclocking) which is quite an annoyance," a user wrote. "This despite a delid modification and a proper water loop, resulting in the fans ramping up and down very frequently, and the temperature appearing to frequently spike near the danger zone." Intel, naturally, deployed a sanitized response, saying that "the reported behavior of the 7th Generation Intel Core i7-7700K Processor, showing momentary temperature changes from the idle temperature, is normal while completing a task (like opening a browser or an application or a program)." Business talk all the way, but to be honest, we don't even know if there is a real problem here, though there are so pretty interesting OCCT graphs being posted on the forum page. What do you say? Any of our users have seen similar issues?

Source: Communities @ Intel, The Register

You Really Shouldn't Delid AMD's Ryzen 7 CPUs

Power users sometimes really go the extra mile towards achieving the best performance on their hardware. And sometimes, this process includes delidding, as in, removing the processor's Integrated Heatspreader (IHS). This would allow for users to sometimes replace less than perfect TIM (Thermal Interface Material) companies use, achieving lower operating temperatures, and possibly even higher overclocks.

Well, you really shouldn't try to do so with AMD's Ryzen 7. The reason: attempting to delid said processors cost overclocking genius der8auer a grand total of 3 (three!) Ryzen 7 samples before he managed to do it without damaging the processor. This happens because contrary to other CPUs, AMD's Ryzen 7 IHS comes soldered to the chip, which obviously increases difficulty and risk of such a delidding process. Apparently, AMD did a pretty good job with the thermal interfaces of Ryzen 7 anyway - der8auer achieved only a 2ºC decrease in operating temperatures on the delidded Ryzen sample. Long story short: maybe it's not worth it. Especially if your cooling solution of choice isn't able to achieve proper contact with the CPU after the process. You can see a video of the direct cooling test, after the break.

Following Ryzen's Launch, Intel's CPUs Likely to See Price-Cuts

Let's quietly approach the elephant in the room: Intel's pricing structure will hardly stand the onslaught of AMD's Ryzen, which, if early benchmarks are to be believed, has apparently caught Intel with its pants down. Even purely from the leaks that have been following us non-stop in the last several months, it's obvious that AMD managed to outdo itself in the best way possible, managing to develop an architecture which offers up to 52% more performance than their previous one. Intel, which was enjoying the sun-shaded comfort of carrying a virtual, high-performance x86 monopoly, grew stagnant in innovation, ensuring it would stretch its bottom-line by way of minimal R&D investment - just enough to be able to name their improvements as a "new generation" of processors each year.

This in turn has led to an interesting outlook in the high-performance x86 market: customers aren't blind, and they see when a company is stretching its fingers in their pockets. A stagnant performance increase on Intel's customer processors with almost a decade of single-digit increments and paralyzed core-counts to an (admittedly strong) architecture have taken away a lot of customers' goodwill towards Intel. That Intel still has strong brand cognition is a no-brainer, but it doesn't have as much brand credit these days, on account of the low performance gains, and tick-tock falter, than it did in the days of Athlon 64. AMD has the benefit of being the underdog, of coming up with something new, fresh and performant (with headlines claiming it is the latest revival of a sleeping giant)... and those are all points that put pressure on Intel to reignite interest on its products.

AMD Socket AM4 "Bristol Ridge" APU De-lidded

Here are some of the first pictures of an AMD socket AM4 APU being de-lidded. De-lidding is the process of removing the IHS (integrated heatspreader), the metal plate covering the CPU die. Some PC enthusiasts remove the IHS to improve heat-transfer between the CPU and extreme cooling solutions, such as LN2/dry-ice evaporators. Overclocker Nam Dae Won, with access to a couple of socket AM4 chips (most likely 7th generation A-series "Bristol Ridge" APUs), de-lidded the chips, revealing a large rectangular die. AMD is using high-quality TIM between the die and the IHS, which could either be solder or liquid metal. There's also a clear picture of the underside pin-grid of the AM4 chip, which has a central cutout that lacks any SMT components. Socket AM4 has 1,331 pins.
Sources: Nam Dae Won (Facebook page), PCGH

Cooler Master Intros Master Gel Series Thermal Compounds

Cooler Master introduced a trio of high-performance thermal interface materials (TIMs), under the new Master Gel series. These include the Master Gel, the Master Gel Pro, and the Master Gel Maker Nano. The Master Gel is the most affordable of the three, targeted at gaming PC builds, as a replacement to the stock TIM your an air-cooler ships with. Its main feature is low viscosity, enabling easier application. It also has zero burn-in time. The Master Gel Pro is slightly more premium, with higher metal particle density, for higher thermal conductivity than the Master Gel. This is targeted at enthusiasts with DIY liquid cooling setups. Leading the pack is the Master Gel Maker Nano. This has the highest metal nano-particle density, for thermal conductivity as high as 11 W/m.k, and is targeted at professional overclockers with extreme cooling setups, such as LN2 and dry-ice.

Prolimatech Announces the PK-Zero Thermal Compound

Prolimatech announced the PK-Zero thermal interface material (TIM) in retail packaging. Available in user quantities of 1.5 g, 5 g, and 30 g; and larger 150 g, 300 g, and 600 g cans for system-integrators and enthusiasts who frequently swap out their CPUs; the PK-Zero is an aluminium-based compound. It features zero burn-in time, letting you get its full performance straight from installation. Its thermal conductivity is rated at 8 W/m-°C, and thermal impedance 0.019 °C-in²/W, with a dielectric constant of 4 kV/mm. The compound is non-conductive for its intended use. Prolimatech didn't reveal pricing.

Lian Li Announces The CB-01 CPU Water Cooling Block

Lian-Li Industrial Co. Ltd announces the CB-01 CPU Water Block. Manufactured by Lian Li in partnership with cooling experts from Overclockers, UK, a world-record overclocking team, this is Lian Li's first water block ever. With their passion for quality materials, the CB-01 is made to the same exacting standards as Lian Li's outstanding cases. The cold plate has a heart of solid copper in a nickel coating and a final layer of tin-cobalt for extra cooling, durability, and corrosion resistance. The top is a translucent acrylic block that visibly guides the cooling waters through the microchannels. The simple yet sturdy mounting fit s virtually all modern and past motherboard sockets securely. For a bit of flare, there are holes pre-drilled for 5mm LED lights.

The CB-01 uses a standard G1/4" thread so most DIY water cooling components will easily fit the inlet and outlet ports. The inlet is deliberately offset against the outlet to allow the coolest water to enter the block in direct contact with the middle of the hottest CPU core. It then flows across the other cores and vents on the opposite side. The microchannels have an area of 32.2mm by 27.3mm but because they are contoured with precision grooves, they provide a greater overall surface area. While not the largest, these dimensions were deliberately chosen to strike a balance between high restriction and high flow for the best cooling for its size. Lian Li used their precision manufacturing to ensure the microchannels are as thin as possible for maximum performance.

Arctic Starts Selling Thermal Pads You Cut to Shape

ARCTIC Thermal Pad bridges problem-free even large spaces. After multiple awards with its thermal pastes, ARCTIC is now offering thermal pads as well. As perfect gap filler the Thermal Pad provides an optimal heat transfer and bridges even large height differences and uneven surfaces.

Often it is troublesome to cool diverse components like memory chips, CPUs, MCUs, DSPs and other ICs densely packed. Different heights prevent a proper contact to the heatsink and thus make it useless. The thermal pad is perfect to close even large spaces completely. Due to its low hardness this silicon pad adapts ideally to uneven surfaces, also at low pressure and thus ensures the best possible heat dissipation. In the comparison test the Thermal Pad with its special filler and a high thermal conductivity can demonstrate its performance and leaves the competitors behind.

EKWB Indigo Xtreme ETI and Supremacy EVO Elite Now for LGA-2011-3

EK Water Blocks, Ljubljana based premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is proud to introduce new Indigo Xtreme Engineered Thermal Interface for the latest 5th generation Intel Socket LGA-2011-3 series CPU as well as Supremacy EVO Elite CPU water block + Indigo Xtreme ETI bundle.

EK-TIM Indigo Xtreme represents the latest generation Engineered Thermal Interface (ETI) and fits neatly between a CPU lid and water block (or heat sink) to keep CPUs cooler. Unlike greases, metallic thermal interface pads or liquid metal alloys, Indigo XS is a self-contained and sealed structure, deploying a Phase Change Metallic Alloy (PCMA) which reflows and fills surface asperities on the CPU lid and heat sink.

EK Water Blocks Ectotherm TIM Now Sold Separately in 5 g Syringes

EK Water Blocks, Ljubljana based premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is proud to introduce EK-TIM Ectotherm in retail packaging. The very same thermal compound, previously only available when bundled with EK Full Cover water blocks, is now available for separate purchase in a practical 5g dose.

EK-TIM Ectotherm is a best in-class thermal compound with exceptional value for money. This thermal interface material provides an effective heat transfer and easy application between CPU, GPU or any other PCH/chipset and heat sink.

Intel Updates Desktop CPU Roadmap, Haswell-E, Broadwell, Devil's Canyon Blip

At GDC, Intel announced a backpedal from its plans to eventually reshape desktop CPUs into components that come hardwired to the motherboards across the line, by announcing three new CPU families. It includes the Haswell-E HEDT platform, Broadwell performance platform, and Devil's Canyon. The three are expected to launch in reverse order, beginning with Devil's Canyon. A variant of existing "Haswell" silicon in the LGA1150 package, Devil's Canyon is codename for a breed of hand-picked chips with "insane" overclocking potential. In addition to binned dies, the chips feature a performance-optimized TIM between the die and the integrated heatspreader (IHS). The dies will be placed on special "high tolerance" packages, with equally "special" LGA contact points. The chips will be designed with higher voltage tolerance levels. Devil's Canyon is expected to branded under the existing Core i7-4xxx series, possibly with "Extreme" brand extension. It will be compatible with motherboards based on the Z97 chipset.

Next up, is "Broadwell." A successor to Haswell, Broadwell is its optical shrink to Intel's new 14-nanometer silicon fab process, with minor improvements to IPC, new power-management features, and likely added instruction sets, much like what "Ivy Bridge" was to "Sandy Bridge." It will take advantage of the new process to step up CPU and iGPU clock speeds. Broadwell is expected to launch in the second half of 2014. Lastly, there's Haswell-E. Built in the company's next-gen LGA2011 socket (incompatible with the current LGA2011), this HEDT (high-end desktop) processor will feature up to eight CPU cores, up to 15 MB of L3 cache, a 48-lane PCI-Express 3.0 root complex, and a quad-channel DDR4 integrated memory controller (IMC). Intel is also planning to launch a socketed variant of the Core i7-4770R, which is based on the company's Haswell GT3e silicon, which features the Iris Pro 5200 graphics core, with 40 execution units, and 128 MB of L4 cache.

X2 Releases the Thermica Thermal Interface Material

Introducing the latest addition to the X2 series of high performance pc hardware and accessories, the X2 Thermica is a high performance, composite thermal interface material designed to maximize heat transfer from processors to heat-sink enabling you to get more cooling performance!

The high viscosity formula efficiently fills invisible surface imperfections to improve contact and thermal conductivity. The supplied 0.5g syringe is sufficient for 2 processor cooler installations. The X2 Thermica is a must have for every PC enthusiast. X2 - All geared up!

EK Unveils the Indigo XS Ultra-Performance Engineered Thermal Interface

EK Water Blocks, Ljubljana-based premium water cooling gear manufacturer, is proud to introduce the latest latest generation Engineered Thermal Interface (ETI) for Intel Core LGA-115x processors.

EK-TIM Indigo XS is the successor to EK-TIM Indigo Xtreme and represents the latest generation Engineered Thermal Interface (ETI). Fits neatly between a CPU lid and water block (or heat sink) to keep CPUs cooler. Unlike greases, metallic thermal interface pads or liquid metal alloys, Indigo XS is a self-contained and sealed structure, deploying a Phase Change Metallic Alloy (PCMA) which reflows and fills surface asperities on the CPU lid and heat sink. Indigo XS achieves high thermal performance through the optimized deployment of molten, oxide-free PCMA, thereby yielding low contact resistance and low bulk resistance. The resultant interfacial layer is void-free and robust, with low thermal contact and bulk resistance.

GIGABYTE GTX TITAN with WindForce 3X Bundle Official

At Computex, GIGABYTE unveiled its GeForce GTX TITAN with WindForce 3X bundle (GV-NTITANOC-6GD-B), in which you get a reference-design yet factory-overclocked card, and a WindForce 3X cooling solution that you DIY install it on the card yourself. Both the card and the cooler are bundled into a single large box. The card comes factory-overclocked at 928 MHz core, 980 MHz GPU Boost, and 6.00 GHz memory. It maintains these clocks even with the reference cooler, but it could get louder than normal, and may not be able to sustain boost states as the GPU temperature jousts with the 80°C mark. With the WindForce 3X cooler installed, the card will run quieter, and the GPU will sustain boost states better.

The WindForce 3X cooler is complex aluminum fin-stack heatsink, in which two equally-sized aluminum fin stacks draw heat from the GPU, using five 8 mm-thick copper heat pipes. These are ventilated by a trio of 80 mm fans suspended on a metal shroud. Included in the add-on package are thermal pads for the memory and VRM, two syringes of TIM, screws, washers, an Allen key, and a large mouse-pad. GIGABYTE could price the card at a premium.

XIGMATEK Also Announces Xi-3 HDT Thermal Compound

In addition to the Dark Knight Frostbourne Edition CPU cooler, XIGMATEK announced the new Xi-3 HDT thermal compound optimized for CPU coolers with heatpipe direct touch (HDT) bases. In such a base, heatpipes of the cooler make direct contact with the CPU, and are nested inside grooves of the base. Gaps between the base and the heat pipes tend to reduce surface area of contact between the cooler and the CPU. By design, HDT bases are less "polished," it helps to have a thermal compound that can seep into to surface irregularities better.

The Xi-3 HDT from XIGMATEK is advertised to have smaller particle size, while making up with higher density. The company didn't specify the composition of the compound, but detailed its characteristics. Its viscosity is rated at 104 Pa·s, specific gravity at 2.5 g/cm³, and an impressive 9.1 W/mK thermal conductivity. As with most performance TIMs on the market, it features an anti-bleed composition, isn't electrically conductive, and has an applied life rated at 10 years. It is sold in 4 g syringes, the company did not reveal pricing.
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