Monday, April 2nd 2012

Durango Implements Always-On DRM, Multi-GPU

Microsoft's next-generation Xbox console, codenamed "Durango", will implement an "always-on" DRM, according to a VG 24/7 report. Always-on is a stringent anti-piracy measure that's already in use with some PC game titles published by Ubisoft, which requires the players to be connected to the Internet when playing. Even as its proponents (read: game publishers only), claim increased sales, it faces strong opposition from the gaming community. The Christmas 2013 (tentative) launch of Durango rides on the assumption that fast, always-on broadband Internet will have proliferated to every living room.

Next up, there's talk of Durango featuring a unique multi-GPU hardware design that doesn't resemble symmetric PC multi-GPU technologies such as NVIDIA SLI or AMD CrossFire, but instead, the two GPUs will be tasked with rendering the same object redundantly. Perhaps Durango features native flicker-free stereoscopic 3D capability, and the two GPUs are merely rendering the two planes? Once again, there's talk that these GPUs will be designed by AMD. The CPU of Durango will feature "four or six" cores. Lastly, Blu-ray disc is back as the storage medium, in these latest rumors.Source: VG247, VR-Zone
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41 Comments on Durango Implements Always-On DRM, Multi-GPU

#1
TheGuruStud
And there we go with anti-communist propaganda talk.

I've heard of enough of that from the govt.

Everyone and every system is corrupt. Deal with that instead of making excuses.
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#2
NC37
Jstn7477 said:
Gamers will probably miss the days where you could just plug the console into your TV and play/share games. I remember playing PS2 in the car years ago when I went on some road trips.

What happens when XBOX "3" no longer has support from Microsoft? Will that kill the ability to even have a working XBOX "3" 20 years from now when people could still have fully functioning NES/SNES/N64 systems that are free of restrictions?

I'm fine with Steam, but I'll hate the day that the Steam network ceases to exist (if the software now is still even compatible with computers then).
On the plus side with Steam, if that day comes, according to the rules of Steam, all the games become instant DRM unlocked and you own them completely. Which I remember this being one of the caveats EA had back when they started fighting with Valve.
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#3
faramir
"Even as its proponents (read: game publishers only), claim increased sales, it faces strong opposition from the gaming community. "

No opposition from me ... and no sales. Phuck them, if they are greedy and want to screw themselves up, let them ! The more people ignore their new console, the better.
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#4
MikeMurphy
Multi-GPU design? I don't think so. There isn't any need for it. It would offer nothing in terms of power consumption, performance or cost.
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#5
KainXS
if they mean i need internet to play im not buying it, microsoft can go f**k themselves

one game with it every few months is one thing but every game f**k that.
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#6
Mega-Japan
KainXS said:
if they mean i need internet to play im not buying it, microsoft can go f**k themselves

one game with it every few months is one thing but every game f**k that.
It's up to people whether or not they'd actually swallow whatever behemoths like Microsoft and Sony throws at them. We know companies like Nintendo wouldn't do such a thing, or at least I sure hope they don't.
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#7
dzero
Well I just have to get one. I need my...uh Halo fix.
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#9
entropy13
TheMailMan78 said:
I support people protecting their property. Thats very consistent with libertarian ideals. However forcing people to give hard work away for free for the "good of man" tends to be a communist attitude. Honestly Ford I didn't peg you as a commie. :laugh:
lolwut you have to be a "commie" if you have such ideals LOL

TheMailMan78 said:
Its called intellectual property. However you have to have real intellect to understand that. But I agree we should stop there.
Aahh, intellectual property. First created to protect big corporations and really doesn't help the "small guys" anyway. Specifically, first created to protect big corporations from stealing the property of almost always non-corporate entities.
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#10
[H]@RD5TUFF
Just a few more reasons why consoles need to DIE!
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#11
Mega-Japan
[H]@RD5TUFF said:
Just a few more reasons why consoles need to DIE!
Yes, because a lot of PC games aren't doing the exact same thing...
:sigh:
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#12
Delta6326
I honestly wouldn't mind this if Internet was super common... but people need to realize the USA is so far behind. The only internet you can get around here(I live out in the country on a ranch) is dial-up, or pay for $60+ for Satellite and get 512Kb down and 128Kb up and can only use 3GB a month.:banghead: Run a fiber cable to my home and I won't complain one bit.
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#13
KainXS
I went to australia last year and I will say . . . . . their isp's are waaayyy worst than ours, i shed a tear for them aussies.
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#15
Alvy Ibn Feroz
There will still be piracy and the honest customers will have pain in the ass. Also many people will play pirated games because it will be mush easier and you can play anytime you want
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#16
MarksmanR
This is really bad if true... 99.9% of the time I have internet connected, but what happens when there's a windy storm and the net drops out? Or if I want to take my console to someone's house without the internet... or if Microsoft's servers are temporarily down or if they eventually permanently stop support for Xbox 3.

Relying on a working internet connection to play games is too restrictive and unreliable.
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