Monday, January 14th 2013

BClk-based Overclocking Returns with Haswell?

With Intel's 2011-launched Core "Sandy Bridge" processors, Intel CPU overclocking as we know it changed. No longer could you overclock the CPU by stepping up BClk (base clock), a frequency that processors use to time various components, including the effective clock speed, and in some cases, memory, and uncore. Sandy Bridge left consumers with only one effective way of overclocking, stepping up an unlocked BClk multiplier, a feature only available with a handful expensive models.

According to a Hardcoreware report, when Intel took up the "one BClk to rule them all" approach with Sandy Bridge, it may have overlooked the possibility of the integrated GPU waking other components up from lower power states to use the L3 cache, affecting the chip's overall energy efficiency, which carried on to successive Core "Ivy Bridge" silicon. "Haswell" may present Intel with an opportunity to split core and uncore from sharing the same base clock, and as such it could be possible to crank up CPU clock speeds using BClk, without destabilizing the uncore. The author admits this is speculation on his part, but quite likely.Source: Hardcoreware
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36 Comments on BClk-based Overclocking Returns with Haswell?

#1
Tatty_One
Super Moderator
johnspack said:
Good, I won't be bothering with Haswell for probably years. I just want sb-e. And thank god it doesn't have an iGPU. Now I know I want one for sure. I just have to wait about a year more before I can afford it. Gotta love being on a fixed income where I spend half of it just on rent, 1/4 of what's left on cable. Gives me about $300can a month for food, clothes, medicine, and computer parts. I spend typically 100- 200 on computer parts, so basically I starve most months. How's your dedication to computers?
Never starve for a PC, I thought technology was supposed to bring a greater quality of life!
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#2
badtaylorx
Random Murderer said:
You mean as in any "Extreme Edition" processor?
Anytime you see an Intel chip with "X" in the name(x6800, qx9650, 980x, 3960x, etc.), you know it's hugely overpriced and is meant for that guy who doesn't want to buy a bunch of regular chips and bin them himself, and will most likely be run sub-ambient at least once.
i think that was tongue-and-cheek
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#3
Shihabyooo
Tatty_One said:
I thought technology was supposed to bring a greater quality of life!
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#4
SeventhReign
johnspack said:
Good, I won't be bothering with Haswell for probably years. I just want sb-e. And thank god it doesn't have an iGPU. Now I know I want one for sure. I just have to wait about a year more before I can afford it. Gotta love being on a fixed income where I spend half of it just on rent, 1/4 of what's left on cable. Gives me about $300can a month for food, clothes, medicine, and computer parts. I spend typically 100- 200 on computer parts, so basically I starve most months. How's your dedication to computers?
The only place you'll find a SB-E in a year is used on eBay. I would avoid that at all costs.
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#5
Frenzic
I think an iGPU is handy if your dedicated GPU packs up and you have no spare. :)
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#6
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
badtaylorx said:
i think that was tongue-and-cheek
Right over my head, lol
Posted on Reply
#7
jonjonjon
not everyone needs a video card

just because you buy a $300 video card doesn't mean that's what everyone else does. the intel HD 4000 graphics are good enough for 99% of people who aren't playing the newest AAA games. even if you are using a video card why do you care if the cpu has a igpu anyway? if they launched a version of the cpu without the igpu it would be the same exact thing with a disabled igpu.

i did get a good laugh at the person who is going to spend more to get a socket 2011 cpu because it doesn't have a igpu. the real reason to get 2011 is for the 6 core cpu's.
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#8
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
jonjonjon said:
the real reason to get 2011 is for the 6 core cpu's.
Or an overclockable quad-core with quad-channel memory, VT-d support, at 10Mb of L3 vs 8Mb. I've been very happy with my 3820, it also didn't cost all that much either.
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#9
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
Aquinus said:
Or an overclockable quad-core with quad-channel memory, VT-d support, at 10Mb of L3 vs 8Mb. I've been very happy with my 3820, it also didn't cost all that much either.
Agreed. The 3820 can be had for less than the 3770K and the same price as the non-K.
The most expensive part of a 2011 system is the mobo, but the benefits of 2011 are like Aquinus said, flexible overclocking(not restricted to multiplier only), quad-channel memory, VT-d, more L3 cache, and one he didn't mention, SB-E has TWICE the native pci-e lanes of SB and IVB.
That being said, LGA2011 is an enthusiast platform and comes with the price and features to match.
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#10
Ferrum Master
Random Murderer said:
Agreed. The 3820 can be had for less than the 3770K and the same price as the non-K.
The most expensive part of a 2011 system is the mobo, but the benefits of 2011 are like Aquinus said, flexible overclocking(not restricted to multiplier only), quad-channel memory, VT-d, more L3 cache, and one he didn't mention, SB-E has TWICE the native pci-e lanes of SB and IVB.
That being said, LGA2011 is an enthusiast platform and comes with the price and features to match.
What I have less on my even older X58? :laugh: 1-2 fps?
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#11
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
Ferrum Master said:
What I have less on my even older X58? :laugh: 1-2 fps?
Enthusiast platforms are just that. I still love my old x48 setup, even though it's found a new home on a friend's desk.
Hell, 1366 is still a very formidable platform. Here's to hoping 2011 holds up as well as 1366 has:toast:
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