Monday, July 27th 2015

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 Specifications Surface

Here are possible specifications of NVIDIA's upcoming entry-mainstream graphics card, the GeForce GTX 950. It was earlier rumored to be named the "GTX 950 Ti." NVIDIA is designing this to succeed the GTX 750 Ti, and to compete with the Radeon R7 370. It will be based on the GM206 silicon, the same one that drives the GTX 960, but with a quarter of its CUDA cores disabled. This puts the CUDA core count of the GTX 950 at 768, and its TMU count at 48. Its ROP count will remain at 32, memory bus width at 128-bit, and it will ship with 2 GB of GDDR5 memory.

The GeForce GTX 950 will likely ship with clock speeds ranging between 1150 to 1250 MHz core, 1350 to 1450 MHz GPU Boost, and around 6.60 to 6.75 GHz memory, with its memory bandwidth set around 107.68 GB/s. The reference card will draw power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector, and its typical board power is rated at just 90W. The card will likely feature 2-way SLI support, and its display outputs will include a combination of dual-link DVI, HDMI 2.0, and DisplayPort 1.2 connectors. NVIDIA is expected to launch the GeForce GTX 950 on 17th August, 2015.
Source: HWBattle
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17 Comments on NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 Specifications Surface

#1
lZKoce
The 9XX- series tech is trickling down the lane...coming to my budget range X40-X50/Ti series. :)
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#2
HumanSmoke
btarunr said:
The reference card will draw power from a single 8-pin PCIe power connector, and its typical board power is rated at just 90W.
Providing a 225W draw ( 150W + 75W PCI-E slot) seems a tad overkill for a card nominally rated at 90W
Posted on Reply
#3
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
HumanSmoke said:
Providing a 225W draw ( 150W + 75W PCI-E slot) seems a tad overkill for a card nominally rated at 90W
Maxwell overclocking does wonders, and having that headroom helps too.
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#4
hojnikb
Hopefully, 750Ti get rebranded to 950 and a price cut (like 99$ would be great) :)
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#5
Lionheart
I'm sure a 6pin PCI-E connector would suffice even for heavy overclocking :confused:

Good budget card if priced well ;)
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#6
Chaitanya
Like others, I dont understand the need for 8-pin Pci-E power connector. Else looks like these are going to make good htpc cards.
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#7
the54thvoid
Maybe wholesale reuse of the 960 pcb?
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#8
mouacyk
Will this support full HEVC hardware-based decoding like the 960?
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#9
racedaemon
They probably put the power connector there because a "budget" card is usually paired with a budget PSU that not always delivers on spec, even more so those without a VGA power connector (presuming those still exist). Lots of RMAs and support calls averted by a cheap connector. :)

Anyway, i'm looking forward to see benchmarks of this card. Maybe i'll switch from the integrated graphics i use now. But the price has to be right. In my part of Europe the 960 is $250, the 950 has to land at $150 for me to start considering a purchase. But I don't think retailers are going to allow a $100 gap. Maybe the new electronics trade agreement will help...
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#10
MilkyWay
Full HEVC hardware-based decoding would make this a great video card for a HTPC. Be great for running MPC-HC and madvr.
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#11
xorbe
Hopefully the 950 is more bang-per-buck than the 960, even though slower. ie, I hope they don't just scale the price linearly with performance. I have a hard time with the 960 price for a 128-bit product.
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#12
Octavean
mouacyk said:
Will this support full HEVC hardware-based decoding like the 960?
It sounds like its a cut down GTX 960 / GM206 therefore its reasonable to assume it would have a similar feature set. So yes, HEVC decode / encode would be something I would expect to see as well as HDMI 2.0 support and so on. All things the AMD offering in this price range will never have since its a triple or quadruple rebrand of much older tech,.....

This GTX 950 could be very interesting if it hits the market at the right price. I'm thinking somewhere in the ~$150 range.

That could be a killer card for someone who just wants an entry level desktop card for 4K work (ie no gaming). This could be one of the cheapest solutions that will do 4K at 60Hz via HDMI 2.0.
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#13
Ikaruga
This is very nice for the budget segment, but I still hope for a 960Ti, a full GM206 with 192bit bus and 3GB memory, that would be perfect choice for the kid's next build.
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#14
rruff
xorbe said:
I have a hard time with the 960 price for a 128-bit product.
The cores are 75%, the memory bandwidth 95%, and memory amount 100% of the 960, so it won't be cutting the memory capability so close.
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#15
RejZoR
Framebuffer compression...
Posted on Reply
#16
xorbe
RejZoR said:
Framebuffer compression
But when the going gets tough, it stumbles. 128 is 128.
Posted on Reply
#17
RejZoR
When going get tough, then why GTX 980 with 256bit bus works equally fast as R9-390 with 512bit bus but no framebuffer compression? There are other factors but don't strictly judge it on the bus width...
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#18
xorbe
RejZoR said:
don't strictly judge it on the bus width
Of course not!
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