Monday, October 12th 2015

EK Releases Full-coverage Water Block for Intel 750 Series PCIe SSD

EK Water Blocks, Ljubljana based premium liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is proud to introduce its first solid-state drive water block - the EK-FC I750 SSD for Intel Solid-State Drive 750 Series. EK-FC I750 SSD is a Full-Cover water block for water cooling the Intel SSD 750 Series solid-state drive. Designed in cooperation with Intel, we followed the overall look of the original passive cooler and made sure the entire PCB is covered, thus delivering the best possible cooling performance.

The water block features a high flow design allowing it to be easily used with systems using weaker water pumps. The base is made of nickel-plated electrolytic copper while the top cover is made of stainless steel. Screw-in brass standoffs are pre-installed and allow for safe, painless installation procedure. Enclosed is the additional EK-FC Terminal with two G1/4" threaded ports on the side (right picture below). Customers might need it if there isn't enough space to install the fittings on a regular pre-installed terminal (left picture below).
EK-FC I750 SSD is readily available for purchase through EK Webshop and Partner Reseller Network. MSR price with included VAT is 89.90€.
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20 Comments on EK Releases Full-coverage Water Block for Intel 750 Series PCIe SSD

#1
night.fox
wait what? are this PCI SSD's getting very hot that needs water cooling? what is going on now?
Posted on Reply
#2
TheinsanegamerN
night.fox
wait what? are this PCI SSD's getting very hot that needs water cooling? what is going on now?
Yes, PCIE SSDs do run much hotter than sata varients. Just look at all the complaints of overheating from the first gen of PCIE m.2 drives. Some were hitting 75c during normal operation. These drives are larger, and run much faster, than m.2 drives. The metal shroud on the stock model is in fact a heatsink.

That being said, this is more for gamers/system builders that already have a water cooling loop, and want to add a 750 series. Cost is of little-to-no factor.
Posted on Reply
#3
Chloe Price
Maybe they took my joke too seriously when I commented on a Finnish hardware site that "I'll wonder when we see the first water-cooled SSD's." :)
Posted on Reply
#4
Darksword
Water-cooled DRAM and sound cards next. God help us all.
Posted on Reply
#5
RealNeil
If they build it, will we come?
Posted on Reply
#6
GreiverBlade
interesting, now please, another brand to do it and i might be really interested.
mainly because the MSRP of this is nearly close to the price i paid for the Kryographics Hawaii nickel-ed copper black edition (plexi) block i got for my 290 back in the day (even if i count the backplate )
Posted on Reply
#7
Brusfantomet
Darksword
Water-cooled DRAM and sound cards next. God help us all.
That already exist

i miss water cooled PSUs, a 1500 W PSU with a 90% efficiency will dump 166 Watt into the air.
Posted on Reply
#8
Chaitanya
Just wondering what about the chips on the back of PCB? If I remember correctly many review samples didnt even have a backplate/heatsink for the chips on back while front was well covered with a massive heatsink.
Posted on Reply
#9
night.fox
TheinsanegamerN
Yes, PCIE SSDs do run much hotter than sata varients. Just look at all the complaints of overheating from the first gen of PCIE m.2 drives. Some were hitting 75c during normal operation. These drives are larger, and run much faster, than m.2 drives. The metal shroud on the stock model is in fact a heatsink.

That being said, this is more for gamers/system builders that already have a water cooling loop, and want to add a 750 series. Cost is of little-to-no factor.
but 75c should be a problem right? those chips were to stand more than 100c. as far as i know.

But shure these are for guys who has a loop already. its pretty stupid to build a water cooling just for this ssd's
Posted on Reply
#10
WithoutWeakness
Chaitanya
Just wondering what about the chips on the back of PCB? If I remember correctly many review samples didnt even have a backplate/heatsink for the chips on back while front was well covered with a massive heatsink.
The SSD controller is what needs to be cooled. The NAND chips do not need any sort of heatsink to stay cool on their own. The chips under the heatsink on the PCIe-based version have thermal pads just because there is no space for airflow.

The 750 series SSD from Intel can pull up to 22W under sustained load. That's not a ton of heat to dissipate and I think the stock heatsink should be good enough. Watercooling has never been about being good enough, though.
Posted on Reply
#11
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
Darksword
Water-cooled DRAM and sound cards next. God help us all.
watercooled psu's someday ....trust me ...
Posted on Reply
#12
MIRTAZAPINE
peche
watercooled psu's someday ....trust me ...
I will be very afraid to run a water so close to something drawing 500 watts and more. Just imagine the risk of a leak for watercooled Psu. There will be an arc welding going in there with a leak.
Posted on Reply
#13
Scrizz
peche
watercooled psu's someday ....trust me ...
water cooled monitors... esp with all the overclocking
Posted on Reply
#14
Rylan
peche
watercooled psu's someday ....trust me ...
Yep, those already exist as well. Koolance even made an off the shelf once.
Posted on Reply
#16
Arjai
Next up, water cool your Netgear router!! So, this looks difficult.

Perhaps a water cooled Modem.
Some dude on O/C.com

When can I water cool my phone? really?

I guess I am a bit queasy, after googling this stuff.

I need another glass of Whiskey, and try to forget this post, and this thread.

:rolleyes:
:confused:
:toast:
Posted on Reply
#17
GreiverBlade
peche
watercooled psu's someday ....trust me ...
pfff..... lucky i did post one on your PC atm ... and not a recent one : modded Antec Phantom 500 by Innovatek
MIRTAZAPINE
I will be very afraid to run a water so close to something drawing 500 watts and more. Just imagine the risk of a leak for watercooled Psu. There will be an arc welding going in there with a leak.
yeah yeah ... pretty much like any component in your computer .... yet we do watercool them (ok 110/220V is not 5/12V but still ) PS(u): when i had my dual loop my CPU loop pump and res were exactly on the PSU xD
also as you can see on the pics above ... a leak would pretty much do nothing. (not on the second one tho... that one is scary xD )

leak are a "user added feature", if the loop is done right: little risk of leak
Arjai
When can I water cool my phone? really?
yeah ... they call that watercooling as a marketing argument for naive buyer ... heatpipe is not watercool

just like the Xperia Z5 Premium : that's not a watercooling otherwise we should say that all Laptops are watercooled, and they are not :D
Posted on Reply
#18
DeNeDe
Arjai
Next up, water cool your Netgear router!! So, this looks difficult.

Perhaps a water cooled Modem.
Some dude on O/C.com

When can I water cool my phone? really?

I guess I am a bit queasy, after googling this stuff.

I need another glass of Whiskey, and try to forget this post, and this thread.

:rolleyes:
:confused:
:toast:
Lumia 950 and 950 XL have some kind of Liquid Cooling for their CPU :)
Posted on Reply
#19
peche
Thermaltake fanboy
dear God help us all.... water-cooling everything :shadedshu:
Posted on Reply
#20
Chaitanya
WithoutWeakness
The SSD controller is what needs to be cooled. The NAND chips do not need any sort of heatsink to stay cool on their own. The chips under the heatsink on the PCIe-based version have thermal pads just because there is no space for airflow.

The 750 series SSD from Intel can pull up to 22W under sustained load. That's not a ton of heat to dissipate and I think the stock heatsink should be good enough. Watercooling has never been about being good enough, though.
To a certain extent I am sure the NAND chips also need to be kept cool. Infact I remember reading Anandtech article where they did investigate thermal throttling of SSDs. If Intel 750 Series SSDs are pulling 22W then its a serious amount of energy used by a client storage device. Although in most cases a good airflow with stock heatsink should be sufficient. I am sure this waterblock is for those small group of people who already have a water cooling loop and just would like to add another heat element into the loop.
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