Friday, January 29th 2016

G.Skill Unveils 128GB DDR4-3200 RipJaws V Memory Kit

G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world's leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory and gaming peripherals, is truly excited to announce yet another breakthrough in high-performance, high-capacity DDR4 memory kit by taking a full 128GB (16GBx8), the maximum supported capacity on an X99 motherboard, to an searing speed of DDR4-3200MHz CL14-14-14-34 under 1.35V.

Not only does this massive memory kit manage to max out on supported capacity at high speeds, its latency is also improved to CL14-14-14-34, which is also more efficient than the standard DDR4-2133MHz latency of CL15-15-15-35. At this point, there's nowhere else to go but faster.

Equipped with XMP 2.0 profiles, this massive memory kit has an easy setup and installation. The following screenshot exhibits the DDR4-3200MHz 128GB (16GBx8) memory kit running comfortably on a MSI X99A GODLIKE Gaming motherboard with an Intel Core i7-5960X processor, even after 42 hours of testing.

The DDR4-3200MHz 128GB (16GBx8) kit is the latest addition to the G.SKILL Ripjaws V series, and will be available via G.SKILL authorized distribution partners by the end of February 2016, at a starting price tag of $1069.99 USD.
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28 Comments on G.Skill Unveils 128GB DDR4-3200 RipJaws V Memory Kit

#1
AnnCore
Staff
Over 1000 dollars isn't that much for what you're getting I guess, but what are you getting out of this anyways?

Don't tell me it can run Minecraft or something along those lines. :laugh:

I'd like to know the application of such a set up as 64 GB seems like a lot as it is.
Posted on Reply
#3
natr0n
Memory size is getting a bit ridiculous.
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#4
Rich Knapp
But will this new RAM handle Crysis?
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#5
xkm1948
AnnCore said:
Over 1000 dollars isn't that much for what you're getting I guess, but what are you getting out of this anyways?

Don't tell me it can run Minecraft or something along those lines. :laugh:

I'd like to know the application of such a set up as 64 GB seems like a lot as it is.
You will be surprised. I use my X99 rig for genome file processing. One run of raw genome read is about 8~10GB. Running multiple of these reads through genome aligning pipline can eat up 128GB RAM in no time. I currently have 32GB and I can max out RAM usage easily.
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#6
Kurt Maverick
I have a slightly unrelated question....putting all the 8 modules on a X99 motherboard would reduce the overall RAM speed of all of them, or that's a thing of the past already?

I ask this because my crappy current PC' RAM went down from DDR2 800 to 667 when I installed the 4th module (and it went down from 1066 to 800 when I installed the third one). I don't remember right now if I bought all DDR2 800 modules or 1066, but they're all at least DDR2 800.
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#7
Rich Knapp
Kurt Maverick said:
I have a slightly unrelated question....putting all the 8 modules on a X99 motherboard would reduce the overall RAM speed of all of them, or that's a thing of the past already?

I ask this because my crappy current PC' RAM went down from DDR2 800 to 667 when I installed the 4th module (and it went down from 1066 to 800 when I installed the third one). I don't remember right now if I bought all DDR2 800 modules or 1066, but they're all at least DDR2 800.
Your RAM needs to be the same speeds. Your RAM speeds will always default to the lowest. If you have 1066 modules and 800 modules, 800 would be the speed of all chips. You must have a 667 chip in the mix. Check again

But there really shouldn't be much of a difference in speed. More RAM the better. Speeds are in milliseconds, hardly noticeable. One more thing you can check is the order the chips are in, on your motherboard. I believe the slower chips would go in last according to your motherboard specs.
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#8
Folterknecht
Rich Knapp said:
...

But there really shouldn't be much of a difference in speed. More RAM the better. Speeds are in milliseconds, hardly noticeable. One more thing you can check is the order the chips are in, on your motherboard. I believe the slower chips would go in last according to your motherboard specs.
Old DDR2 systems often behave a little different when it comes to RAM speed and overall performance.
Posted on Reply
#9
Brusfantomet
Kurt Maverick said:
I have a slightly unrelated question....putting all the 8 modules on a X99 motherboard would reduce the overall RAM speed of all of them, or that's a thing of the past already?

I ask this because my crappy current PC' RAM went down from DDR2 800 to 667 when I installed the 4th module (and it went down from 1066 to 800 when I installed the third one). I don't remember right now if I bought all DDR2 800 modules or 1066, but they're all at least DDR2 800.
Cant say about that, but the number of DDR4 modules have a direct impact on post times.
Posted on Reply
#10
PP Mguire
xkm1948 said:
You will be surprised. I use my X99 rig for genome file processing. One run of raw genome read is about 8~10GB. Running multiple of these reads through genome aligning pipline can eat up 128GB RAM in no time. I currently have 32GB and I can max out RAM usage easily.
I could have used this kind of testing when I reviewed a 64GB kit of Hyper X Beast. I literally couldn't find anything besides VMs and RAMDisk that would eat even half that RAM.
Posted on Reply
#11
R-T-B
AnnCore said:

Don't tell me it can run Minecraft or something along those lines. :laugh:
Actually, some of those multi-realm 200+ Minecraft servers might LOVE this... just sayin.
Posted on Reply
#12
xkm1948
PP Mguire said:
I could have used this kind of testing when I reviewed a 64GB kit of Hyper X Beast. I literally couldn't find anything besides VMs and RAMDisk that would eat even half that RAM.
We run most of these types of workload on our super computers where each 16 core nodes Xeon have access to 192GB registered RAM. However there are certain genomic data which will be inappropriate to process on those public funded University computers. We tried in the past and once the University administration found out they were not happy about it at all.

This is how most grad students in our department figured out it is better to use our own PC for those side line projects. 32GB RAM is barely enough for me. I will be grabbing one of these 128GB kit once their price comes down a little bit. This X99+Haswell-E rig is my poor man's super computer. It is still painfully slow comparing with the real deal though. What takes a mere 2hrs project will drag on for an entire day on my X99 platform.
Posted on Reply
#13
PP Mguire
xkm1948 said:
We run most of these types of workload on our super computers where each 16 core nodes Xeon have access to 192GB registered RAM. However there are certain genomic data which will be inappropriate to process on those public funded University computers. We tried in the past and once the University administration found out they were not happy about it at all.

This is how most grad students in our department figured out it is better to use our own PC for those side line projects. 32GB RAM is barely enough for me. I will be grabbing one of these 128GB kit once their price comes down a little bit. This X99+Haswell-E rig is my poor man's super computer. It is still painfully slow comparing with the real deal though. What takes a mere 2hrs project will drag on for an entire day on my X99 platform.
It'd be nice if I was presented a project with a workload like this at work. The closest I came was a team needing to process TBs of data and apparently the team could swap to GPGPU crunching but didn't have the resources available to acquire the hardware or the knowledge to assemble. Found out it was Classified info and I couldn't do the work in my unclassified lab :(
Posted on Reply
#14
Tartaros
AnnCore said:
Don't tell me it can run Minecraft or something along those lines. :laugh:
A single player FTB Infinity game would fill that amount of ram, I'm sure. There isn't a bigger ram hog than that.
Posted on Reply
#15
Kurt Maverick
Rich Knapp said:
Your RAM needs to be the same speeds. Your RAM speeds will always default to the lowest. If you have 1066 modules and 800 modules, 800 would be the speed of all chips. You must have a 667 chip in the mix. Check again

But there really shouldn't be much of a difference in speed. More RAM the better. Speeds are in milliseconds, hardly noticeable. One more thing you can check is the order the chips are in, on your motherboard. I believe the slower chips would go in last according to your motherboard specs.
Didn't I already said that I DEFINITELY don't have any DDR2 modules inferior to 800?

Also, it's a motherboard limitation (I've got one with an AM2+ socket + nForce 750a chipset). What I'd like to know is if X99 motherboards have some kind of similar one.
Posted on Reply
#16
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
Kurt Maverick said:
What I'd like to know is if X99 motherboards have some kind of similar one.
Both my X99 systems have no issues running 3000MHz and beyond with 4 or 8 sticks.
Posted on Reply
#17
PP Mguire
Kurt Maverick said:
Didn't I already said that I DEFINITELY don't have any DDR2 modules inferior to 800?

Also, it's a motherboard limitation (I've got one with an AM2+ socket + nForce 750a chipset). What I'd like to know is if X99 motherboards have some kind of similar one.
I have the Asus 750a SLI with a 940BE and 4 sticks of 1066 running 800. Was just using this machine for a couple of weeks while my main rig was down for water parts and it ran perfectly.
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#18
eidairaman1
Too bad my board only supports unofficially 64GB.
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#19
Kurt Maverick
So, based on those replies, I guess that the problem is the crappy motherboard I own, more than the chipset of anything else...thou I'm still a bit paranoid over that, because I don't wanna sacrifice again memory speed for capacity, and be again in this pathetic situation where I currently have DDR2 667 :P
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#20
PP Mguire
Kurt Maverick said:
So, based on those replies, I guess that the problem is the crappy motherboard I own, more than the chipset of anything else...thou I'm still a bit paranoid over that, because I don't wanna sacrifice again memory speed for capacity, and be again in this pathetic situation where I currently have DDR2 667 :p
Well like was said, DDR2 was a different beast and pretty finicky, plus a lot of Phenom 2 chips had some weak ass IMCs. My 940BE takes anything I give it but my 955BE just gives 0 fucks about being cooperative with me and RAM. DDR3/4 on the other hand plus these new boards and XMP profiles have made it really easy to basically do whatever you want within reason.
Posted on Reply
#21
Fierce Guppy
Kurt Maverick said:
I have a slightly unrelated question....putting all the 8 modules on a X99 motherboard would reduce the overall RAM speed of all of them, or that's a thing of the past already?

I ask this because my crappy current PC' RAM went down from DDR2 800 to 667 when I installed the 4th module (and it went down from 1066 to 800 when I installed the third one). I don't remember right now if I bought all DDR2 800 modules or 1066, but they're all at least DDR2 800.
As Rich Knapp wrote, RAM speeds default to the lowest speed module. In addition, these days RAM modules have a plethora of timings. Buying them as a kit means that there is a greater likelihood they'll work on the motherboard at their rated speed. In the case of DDR4 anything above 2133MHz is not guaranteed to work. It depends on how good the CPU's memory controller is and may also involve some stuffing around with the memory settings in the BIOS to get the modules working at their rated speed. I got lucky. My 16GB 3000MHz (4x4GB) kit works on my motherboard at 3000MHz with a slight increase in voltage to channels C and D.
Posted on Reply
#22
Kurt Maverick
Fierce Guppy said:
As Rich Knapp wrote, RAM speeds default to the lowest speed module. In addition, these days RAM modules have a plethora of timings. Buying them as a kit means that there is a greater likelihood they'll work on the motherboard at their rated speed. In the case of DDR4 anything above 2133MHz is not guaranteed to work. It depends on how good the CPU's memory controller is and may also involve some stuffing around with the memory settings in the BIOS to get the modules working at their rated speed. I got lucky. My 16GB 3000MHz (4x4GB) kit works on my motherboard at 3000MHz with a slight increase in voltage to channels C and D.
Well, I'm either gonna get a Broadwell-E or a Zen CPU....so you tell me how good those memory controllers are gonna be :)

And my current CPU is a Phenom II x4 920. But like I said, that memory speed decrease came specified in the mobo's documentation, if I remember correctly.
Posted on Reply
#23
PP Mguire
Kurt Maverick said:
Well, I'm either gonna get a Broadwell-E or a Zen CPU....so you tell me how good those memory controllers are gonna be :)

And my current CPU is a Phenom II x4 920. But like I said, that memory speed decrease came specified in the mobo's documentation, if I remember correctly.
Anytime I used AMD stuff I inherently ignored stuff and did whatever I want. Like running 4 sticks of 800 in my board. Could probably do 1066 but put priority to CPU clock instead.
Posted on Reply
#24
Kurt Maverick
PP Mguire said:
Anytime I used AMD stuff I inherently ignored stuff and did whatever I want. Like running 4 sticks of 800 in my board. Could probably do 1066 but put priority to CPU clock instead.
...which brings me to another question: Broadwell-E will support up to DDR4-2400. Is there any point on buying, say, DDR4 3000 modules having in mind that I don't plan on overclocking my system? (at least not anytime soon). Is the extra bandwitch useful for something, or does any other PC component uses it?
Posted on Reply
#25
Fierce Guppy
Kurt Maverick said:
...which brings me to another question: Broadwell-E will support up to DDR4-2400. Is there any point on buying, say, DDR4 3000 modules having in mind that I don't plan on overclocking my system? (at least not anytime soon). Is the extra bandwitch useful for something, or does any other PC component uses it?
No. Building a new PC is a rare and exciting event for me, so I splash out a bit. A DDR4-2400 kit will not be a performance bottleneck. At least not for the foreseeable future.
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