Wednesday, March 9th 2016

Seagate Demonstrates 10 GB/s SSD Flash Drive

Seagate Technology plc today unveiled a production-ready unit of the fastest single solid-state drive (SSD) demonstrated to date, with throughput performance of 10 gigabytes per second (GB/s). The early unit meets Open Compute Project (OCP) specifications, making it ideal for hyperscale data centers looking to adopt the fastest flash technology with the latest and most sustainable standards. The 10 GB/s unit, which is expected to be released this summer, is more than 4GB/s faster than the previous fastest-industry SSD on the market. It also meets the OCP storage specifications being driven by Facebook, which will help reduce the power and cost burdens traditionally associated with operating at this level of performance.

"Your data is only as good as how easily you can access it and put it to use," said Brett Pemble, Seagate's general manager and vice president of SSD Products. "Seagate is committed to providing the full spectrum of technologies to help meet the diverse needs of organizations so they can unlock this value. Whether for consumer cloud or business applications, this SSD will help improve on demands for fast access to information, where split seconds drive incremental value gains." The technology would work with any system that supports the Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) protocol, which was developed by Seagate and other consortium vendors to replace the legacy Serial AT Attachment (SATA) standards and eliminate informational bottlenecks. NVMe helps reduce layers of commands to create a faster, simpler language between flash devices.

Organizations that would most benefit from this solution include those processing data for object storage or in real-time, where speed matters most for results, such as large-scale cloud providers and web applications, weather modeling, or statistical trends analysis. The unit could be used in an all-flash array or as an accelerated flash tier with hard-disk drives (HDDs) for a more cost-effective hybrid storage alternative.

"Technology advancements continue to stretch the limits of SSD speed and performance due to growing enterprise demands that require fast data processing at scale," said Gregory Wong, founder and principal analyst, Forward Insights. "Seagate has effectively rewritten the rules for performance with this latest SSD unit. Based on our latest analysis, Seagate is already the leading provider to the emerging PCIe OCP market."

In addition to the 10GB/s SSD technology, which accommodates 16-lane PCIe slots, Seagate is finalizing a second unit for eight-lane PCIe slots, which still performs at the industry-leading throughput of 6.7GB/s, and is the fastest in the eight-lane card category. The eight-lane solution will provide an alternative for organizations looking for the highest levels of throughput speed but in environments limited by power usage requirements or cost.

Both the 16 and eight-lane SSD units have been made available to Seagate customers and are expected for product launch in summer 2016. They will be on display at the upcoming Open Compute Project Summit 2016 in San Jose, Calif. March 9-10 at Seagate's booth.
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18 Comments on Seagate Demonstrates 10 GB/s SSD Flash Drive

#1
RejZoR
I'm surprised they're not really getting involved into consumer market of SSD's.
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#2
Dj-ElectriC
Why would they, really. They enjoy the huge profits they make on their HDDs.
Soon enough they'll have a larger cut, that's for sure. Just not yet

Just a reminder - Seagate owns controller and chip companies
Posted on Reply
#3
McSteel
Alright, I'm calling it: The advertised throughput will last for about 1.6 seconds due to 16GB of RAM on the SSD. As soon as it gets down to using flash, it's gonna drop below 3 GB/s of sustained speed.

Prove me wrong, Seagate.
Posted on Reply
#4
Assimilator
Dj-ElectriC said:
Why would they, really. They enjoy the huge profits they make on their HDDs.
Considering this article, now might be just the right time for the HDD manufacturers to get onto the SSD bandwagon.
Posted on Reply
#5
Fx
Every article I read about Seagate just gives me a reason to yawn. I don't think I'll ever trust their products.
Posted on Reply
#6
Patriot
McSteel said:
Alright, I'm calling it: The advertised throughput will last for about 1.6 seconds due to 16GB of RAM on the SSD. As soon as it gets down to using flash, it's gonna drop below 3 GB/s of sustained speed.

Prove me wrong, Seagate.
They are using 4 m.2 drives on a X16 card.
I see no reason why 4 drives cannot cumulatively break that number.

Courtesy of http://www.anandtech.com/show/10125/seagate-announces-pcie-x16-ssd-capable-of-10gbs
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#7
Prima.Vera
LOL. A flash faster than DDR3-1066. Good times are coming...
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#8
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Depending on the price, I might already know of someone that may buy it. :eek: 2 GB/s isn't fast enough for what they're doing. The write performance sucks if it is only 3.2 GB/s.
Posted on Reply
#9
Dj-ElectriC
Prima.Vera said:
LOL. A flash faster than DDR3-1066. Good times are coming...
Saying "a car faster than a slow plane" isn't really fair.
Posted on Reply
#10
PP Mguire
Prima.Vera said:
LOL. A flash faster than DDR3-1066. Good times are coming...
You realize that RAM and SSDs are both flash, right?

Besides, we have M.2 single drives that can do 2.5GB/s sequential now. There's no reason a proper controller with enough PCI-E lanes and flash chips can't do 10GB/s properly. According to the mockup I saw yesterday, this is not M.2 drives, rather a standalone card ala Intel 750/FusionI/O. SSDs right now are really only limited to the interface they are connected to and how cheap of a controller are mated with them.
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#11
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Volitile versus non-volatile memory. Non-volatile is usually quite a bit slower. If the picture is correct, this PCIe SSD would be the equivilent of running DDR3 quad-channel where DDR3 is still much faster. Additionally, volatile RAM reads about as fast as it writes. I have a strong suspicion this thing is going to write relatively slow.
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#12
PP Mguire
FordGT90Concept said:
Volitile versus non-volatile memory. Non-volatile is usually quite a bit slower. If the picture is correct, this PCIe SSD would be the equivilent of runnding DDR3 quad-channel where DDR3 is still much faster. Additionally, volatile RAM reads about as fast as it writes. I have a strong suspicion this thing is going to write relatively slow.
To the first part, XPoint will make this info of the past.
Posted on Reply
#13
Prima.Vera
PP Mguire said:
You realize that RAM and SSDs are both flash, right?
Wikipedia

Flash memory is a memory storage device for computers and electronics. It is most often used in devices like digital cameras, USBflash drives, and video games. It is quite similar to EEPROM. Flash memory is different from RAM because RAM is volatile (not permanent). When power is turned off, RAM loses all its data.
Posted on Reply
#14
PP Mguire
Prima.Vera said:

If we want to go even more broad, it's all a property of memory.
The fact is the speed is only limited by the bus and controller, without getting into the technical properties of the flash chips themselves. With SATA, we've been limited to the bus. With PCI-E we're limited to controller, lanes dedicated, and the cost for faster items in the consumer space. And again, XPoint will diminish the gap between DRAM and flash as it's fast flash that be used as memory or storage.
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#15
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
DRAM doesn't lose integrity everytime the bits are flipped. XPoint may be able to handle 1000 times more writes than flash memory but that's still infinitely lower than volatile DRAM which does not degrade on each write. XPoint, used as RAM, would fail fast.
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#16
PP Mguire
FordGT90Concept said:
DRAM doesn't lose integrity everytime the bits are flipped. XPoint may be able to handle 1000 times more writes than flash memory but that's still infinitely lower than volatile DRAM which does not degrade on each write. XPoint, used as RAM, would fail fast.
Intel disagrees.
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#17
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/intel-and-micron-announce-3d-xpoint-an-entirely-new-type-of-pc-memory/
The result of a decade-long partnership, this innovation is up to 1,000 times quicker and 1,000 times more durable than existing NAND flash
I could see it being used in enterprise SAS controllers as non-volatile RAM with replacable chips to swap them out as they degrade but that's iffy since DRAM is still a helluvalot faster.

I don't see it being used anywhere else as RAM because it would put a fairly concrete lifespan on the device.
Posted on Reply
#18
PP Mguire
FordGT90Concept said:
http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/intel-and-micron-announce-3d-xpoint-an-entirely-new-type-of-pc-memory/

I could see it being used in enterprise SAS controllers as non-volatile RAM with replacable chips to swap them out as they degrade but that's iffy since DRAM is still a helluvalot faster.

I don't see it being used anywhere else as RAM because it would put a fairly concrete lifespan on the device.
First iteration will come out for enterprise level use and datacenters. Intel plans to roll this out to consumers. They were saying something along the lines of 1TB sticks that can be used as RAM and/or storage simultaneously. They believe it's the future for storage.
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