Wednesday, March 16th 2016

MSI Launches New GeForce GTX 950 Graphics Cards with 75W Board Power

The new MSI GeForce GTX 950 models are the latest addition to MSI's line-up of NVIDIA GeForce GTX 900 series graphics cards. They demonstrate just how power efficient NVIDIA's Maxwell architecture can be, using only 75W power while still providing full GeForce GTX 950 performance. Due to this extreme efficiency, the new MSI GeForce GTX 950 models require no additional power from PEG connectors, but are powered completely through the PCIe slot. The new MSI GeForce GTX 950 models offer gamers with moderate budgets a perfect choice with smooth and solid gaming performance at Full HD, especially in MOBA games. MSI GeForce GTX 950 series cards are equipped with MSI's renowned Military Class 4 components to ensure the highest level of durability and stability.

When used with MSI's famous Afterburner overclocking utility, users can control the MSI GeForce GTX 950's core and memory clock speeds for fine-tuned performance in their creative apps. Afterburner supports the video capturing function Predator and can even be used on smartphones to monitor and control the graphics card in desktop computers. Combined with the Kombustor burn-in testing feature, Afterburner is an essential tool for everyone looking to get the most out of their graphics card.
Add your own comment

34 Comments on MSI Launches New GeForce GTX 950 Graphics Cards with 75W Board Power

#1
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Why two versions?
Posted on Reply
#2
hojnikb
Frick said:
Why two versions?
Possibly for folks with smaller cases. Maybe the bigger version will be more expensive ?
Posted on Reply
#3
L.ccd
That's the second 75W-limited 950 card launched in a few days... could that be the "950 SE" that nvidia was supposed to introduce this month?

If not, then I am curious to see how relevant those power-limited cards are in front of the (supposedly) upcoming 950 SE.
Posted on Reply
#4
hojnikb
Anyone knows if those cards support semi passive mode ?
Posted on Reply
#5
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
hojnikb said:
Possibly for folks with smaller cases. Maybe the bigger version will be more expensive ?
That won't be confusing at all. They don't even need that much cooling afaik.
Posted on Reply
#6
Ferrum Master
I would like a single slot version of this one... it is possible for sure.
Posted on Reply
#7
GhostRyder
Well, seems we have a few then. Now if only one was available to purchase we would be all set.
Posted on Reply
#8
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
GhostRyder said:
Well, seems we have a few then. Now if only one was available to purchase we would be all set.
Well it's important for all the manufacturers to flood the perceived market, with individual companies having reduced sales with each additional company that enters with their own low power 950. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#9
cracklez
Cool beans. We honestly need more cards that operate on just PCIe power. Hopefully with the die shrink coming soon, it'll become even more common on the lower end cards, possibly a low-mid range who knows?

How many watts do fans usually need to operate on a GPU?
Posted on Reply
#10
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
I'm interested in a review of one of these 950s without the PEG Power connector.

My predictions are they don't boost and sit at the base clock all the time, or practically all the time, or they draw more than 75w from the PCI-E x16 slot.
Posted on Reply
#11
silentbogo
newtekie1 said:
I'm interested in a review of one of these 950s without the PEG Power connector.

My predictions are they don't boost and sit at the base clock all the time, or practically all the time, or they draw more than 75w from the PCI-E x16 slot.
What MSI and ASUS most likely did with their models, is they've reduced core and VRAM voltages, while kept all clocks intact.
Even a slight vdrop can reduce the power consumption significantly.

To make a 90W card run in a 75W constrain MSI had to reduce the power draw by less than 20%, which is quite doable.

Maybe not the best example, but downvolting my Xeon from 1.25V to 1.0V at stock clock, and dropping RAM voltages a bit have reduced my total system power consumption by over 20% while keeping the system stable and cool (I don't have a watt-meter, but UPS relative load dropped from 47% to 39% during gaming).
Posted on Reply
#12
GhostRyder
newtekie1 said:
I'm interested in a review of one of these 950s without the PEG Power connector.

My predictions are they don't boost and sit at the base clock all the time, or practically all the time, or they draw more than 75w from the PCI-E x16 slot.
I hope its the latter, I would not mind if it exceeds the normal PCIE limitations as long as its not too extreme.
Posted on Reply
#13
Brusfantomet
Notice that the normal GTX 950 is GM206-250-A1 where as these new ones are GM206-251. it could be that these are something special here, a lack of shaders, different configured memory bus or new process (14 nm test run?)
Posted on Reply
#14
silentbogo
Brusfantomet said:
Notice that the normal GTX 950 is GM206-250-A1 where as these new ones are GM206-251. it could be that these are something special here, a lack of shaders, different configured memory bus or new process (14 nm test run?)
Good catch.
GM206-251 is the same chip, that's used in 950SE with one extra SMX unlocked
Posted on Reply
#15
Brusfantomet
that together with some power tune and circuit tweaking could be the solution to the 15W power drop.
Posted on Reply
#16
alucasa
We need a proper review on those and other 75w 950 from a certain someone.
Posted on Reply
#17
chlamchowder
GhostRyder said:
I hope its the latter, I would not mind if it exceeds the normal PCIE limitations as long as its not too extreme.
Actually, the former would be safer. If some motherboard doesn't support sending more than 75W to a PCIe device, reducing clocks due to the power limit would just introduce a performance hit. Going over the 75 W limit could cause instability.

Some stutter or framerate drop in-game is obviously bad, but crashing is much worse.
Posted on Reply
#18
silentbogo
chlamchowder said:
Actually, the former would be safer. If some motherboard doesn't support sending more than 75W to a PCIe device, reducing clocks due to the power limit would just introduce a performance hit. Going over the 75 W limit could cause instability.

Some stutter or framerate drop in-game is obviously bad, but crashing is much worse.
... or this
Posted on Reply
#19
chlamchowder
silentbogo said:
... or this
How did that happen? Card caught fire?

Oh, and the PCIe slot below looks fine. Just use that one instead :D
Posted on Reply
#20
rruff
Brusfantomet said:
that together with some power tune and circuit tweaking could be the solution to the 15W power drop.
According to TPU tests all the 950s draw >95W. Some a lot more. It's no big deal when you have a 6pin anyway, but on the slot alone you can't be going over spec.
Posted on Reply
#21
truth teller
btarunr said:
using only 75W power while still providing full GeForce GTX 950 performance
btarunr said:
require no additional power from PEG connectors, but are powered completely through the PCIe slot.

there is a peg connector right there
does not compute
in b4 "oh its better to have it just in case it consumes a bit more"
just lie to me more on that copy
in b4 "its there but its not required"
i got pennies to spare - said no corp ever
Posted on Reply
#22
okidna
truth teller said:

there is a peg connector right there
does not compute
in b4 "oh its better to have it just in case it consumes a bit more"
just lie to me more on that copy
in b4 "its there but its not required"
i got pennies to spare - said no corp ever

That's the V1 version picture, not the V2 version.

You can see the difference (I took the photo from MSI official pages) :

V1 version, look at the red box, you can see the 6-pin power connector pin (covering the soldering point) and the power connector itself (covering the white power conector marking on the PCB):




V2 version, again, look at the red box, the white power connector marking is still visible meaning there's no power connector installed and also look at the empty soldering point :


Posted on Reply
#23
Caring1
Frick said:
Why two versions?
I'm guessing the longer version will overclock better as not only is the cooling area larger, the PCB is longer too.
The single fan version would be better suited to small builds running stock.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment