Tuesday, May 24th 2016

Toshiba Launches the OCZ RD400 NVMe SSD Series

Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc., a committed technology leader, today announces the Toshiba OCZ RD400 Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) solid state drive (SSD) series. Designed for cutting-edge notebooks and PCs, the Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) RD400 series provides improved storage bandwidth and enhanced latency resulting in a fast and responsive computing experience.

Unlike Serial Advanced Technology Attachment (SATA) based SSDs utilizing the legacy Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) protocol, NVMe is the first storage protocol designed with SSDs in mind making the RD400 series one of Toshiba's fastest consumer SSDs to date. Additionally, the RD400's PCIe Gen3 x4 lane interface shatters the traditional SATA bottleneck by delivering over four times the performance of SATA SSDs. The RD400 series features sequential read/write speeds of up to 2,600 MB/s and 1,600 MB/s and random read/write performance of up to 210,000 and 140,000 4KiB input/output operations per second (IOPS).
"The launch of the new Toshiba OCZ RD400 SSD series delivers enthusiast-level performance in both a compact M.2 and adapter card form factors to provide end-users with high bandwidth and platform flexibility for next-generation NVMe and PCIe mobile and desktop systems," said Steve Fingerhut, Senior Vice President and GM of SSD BU, at Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. "The RD400 gets back to the OCZ brand's enthusiast roots and offers power-users, gamers, and professionals a cutting-edge storage solution designed to support demanding consumer applications."

The RD400 series is targeted at both desktop and notebook users, but the compact M.2 2280 form factor enables ultra-thin notebooks to take advantage of PCIe speeds. Desktop users can still harness the power of the RD400 even if they don't have an M.2 slot by purchasing the PCIe adaptor card version. Both models will be available in capacities of 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, and 1024 GB.

RD400 SSDs feature Toshiba 15nm MLC NAND flash memory and an endurance rating of up to 592 TBW. Each drive is backed by a 5-year advanced warranty program that strives to minimize the aggravation surrounding traditional support and warranty claims.
Add your own comment

23 Comments on Toshiba Launches the OCZ RD400 NVMe SSD Series

#1
bug
That MLC won't come cheap. But I much prefer it to planar TLC.
Posted on Reply
#2
PP Mguire
Black card, blue PCB'd M.2 SSD. Wat :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#5
R-T-B
bug said:
That MLC won't come cheap. But I much prefer it to planar TLC.
It will come cheaper than it's main NVMe competitor at the moment in retail (the 950 pro).
Posted on Reply
#6
ShurikN
MSRP List
128GB 256GB 512GB 1TB
M.2
$109.99 169.99 309.99 739.99
Add-In Card
$129.99 189.99 329.99 759.99


The prices arent that bad
Posted on Reply
#7
Slizzo
ShurikN said:
MSRP List
128GB 256GB 512GB 1TB
M.2
$109.99 169.99 309.99 739.99
Add-In Card
$129.99 189.99 329.99 759.99


The prices arent that bad
Yeah, not at all. $20 extra for the add in card which is reasonable.
Posted on Reply
#8
Assimilator
Gonna need a longer bargepole before I touch an OCZ product again.
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
Assimilator said:
Gonna need a longer bargepole before I touch an OCZ product again.
My two Vertex4 drives are not amused ;)
Posted on Reply
#10
R-T-B
bug said:
My two Vertex4 drives are not amused ;)
The thousands of other dead OCZ drives are laughing their asses off as Toshiba denies their warranties, however.
Posted on Reply
#11
Slizzo
My old Vector continues to chug along nicely
Posted on Reply
#12
ssdpro
I have a bunch of OCZ drives that are still around. Vertex 4, Vector, Vector 150, RevoDrive 3, all still fine. My Vertex 1 from 2009 with 60TB written even works. Only drive that ever died was a Vertex 2. This RD400 looks competitive in speed but price will be the determining factor.
Posted on Reply
#13
EarthDog
Amazing what a bad apple or two multi generations ago can still influence buyers...

Anyhoo, rooted in reality, should be solid against others...as someone said earlier, depends on the price.
Posted on Reply
#14
R-T-B
EarthDog said:
Amazing what a bad apple or two multi generations ago can still influence buyers...
It's not that. It's how the buyout progressed and Toshiba just dumped all existing OCZ owners while acquiring the name that irked me.

I do think this is probably a good product, that said.
Posted on Reply
#16
Caring1
Will those add in cards work as fast in older systems, or are they chip set dependent? (assuming the Motherboard has PCI-e X4 - 3)
Posted on Reply
#17
xvi
ShurikN said:
MSRP List
128GB 256GB 512GB 1TB
M.2
$109.99 169.99 309.99 739.99
Add-In Card
$129.99 189.99 329.99 759.99


The prices arent that bad
I just saw the 950 Pro 512GB go on sale for $285. That deal has apparently passed, but even now, it's still going for $317.
I'd imagine street price will be lower, but I don't think Toshiba will be making any waves with this.

(edit: Thanks for finding the list, btw)
Posted on Reply
#18
bug
R-T-B said:
The thousands of other dead OCZ drives are laughing their asses off as Toshiba denies their warranties, however.
Toshiba? The only series that had trouble (more than usual) was the Vertex3. Everything else from OCZ was fine.
Posted on Reply
#19
EarthDog
They had two that were pretty bad back in the day. Otherwise, their return rate was no worse than any other.
Posted on Reply
#20
ssdpro
ssdpro said:
I have a bunch of OCZ drives that are still around. Vertex 4, Vector, Vector 150, RevoDrive 3, all still fine. My Vertex 1 from 2009 with 60TB written even works. Only drive that ever died was a Vertex 2. This RD400 looks competitive in speed but price will be the determining factor.
bug said:
Toshiba? The only series that had trouble (more than usual) was the Vertex3. Everything else from OCZ was fine.
While I have had decent success with OCZ/Toshiba products (see my list of drives still ticking), their problems were definitely greater than the Vertex 3 and Agility 3 series alone. The Vertex 2, 1st gen sandforce, was my only drive to die and their reliability ratings are even worse than the 2nd gen Sandforce drives. However, the worst drives they ever made were the Octane and Petrol. Those drives were absolutely terrible. It wasn't just that they died frequently, even when they worked they worked like crap. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227780&cm_re=ocz_petrol-_-20-227-780-_-Product http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227776

Some might even say the more recent Vertex 460 or 450 were the worst... they are rated even lower: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA6232HT6014

Again, my experience has been pretty good with them. It is the Sandforce and lower-end crap that they made that got them in trouble. I never bought the lower end crap to join in the fun. SO my words aren't twisted, I do not blame the consumer for buying value or budget drives. Reliability should not be what is sacraficed, just feature and performance (and maybe warranty).
Posted on Reply
#22
R-T-B
EarthDog said:
Newegg ratings though... LOL
Newegg, the wonderful place I was advised to get a "more reputable name than Seasonic, such as Raidmax."

I wish I had a link.
Posted on Reply
#23
Prima.Vera
I donno. To many really negative comments for even the latest OCZ drives...
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment