Wednesday, April 27th 2016

Intel Readies 34 Xeon Gold and Xeon Platinum Processor Models

Intel is preparing a new nomenclature for its Xeon line of enterprise processors based on core counts. The Xeon Bronze-3000 series will consist of chips with less than 10 cores, Xeon Silver-4000 series with 10 to 12 cores, Xeon Gold-6000 series with 14 to 22 cores, and the top-dog Xeon Platinum-8000 series with 24 to 28 cores. The company will address a variety of enterprise workstation and server markets with these chips. All chips in this lineup will be built in the new LGA-2066 package, and the Xeon Bronze and Xeon Silver parts are confirmed to be based on the "Skylake" microarchitecture.

What is also characteristic of these chips is their vast memory controller with six memory channels, and support for three DIMMs per channel. The top-tier Xeon Platinum-8000 series 28-core chip features 1 MB of dedicated L2 cache per core, and 38.5 MB of shared L3 cache. Its TDP is rated at 208W, and it will be built on Intel's 14 nm process. The 28-core parts come with clock speeds under 2.50 GHz. The 34 Xeon Gold and Xeon Platinum series processors Intel plans to launch over the year are tabled below.
Source: ComputerBase.de
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10 Comments on Intel Readies 34 Xeon Gold and Xeon Platinum Processor Models

#1
Ferrum Master
I guess the naming goes with their price multiplied by weight and name number :D
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#2
Ripper3
Ferrum Master said:
I guess the naming goes with their price multiplied by weight and name number :D
Not the worst pricing structure ever thought up. Depending on how it's taken, it means the Platinum 8180 will be £193,500 @ ~£23.65/g for 8,180g, and Intel will be paying off an entire platter of chips with one sale.

EDIT: On second thought, maybe we shouldn't encourage Intel to do this. Imagine the cost of desktop CPUs if they do the same pricing structure
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#3
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
I feel this is pretty pointless. The numbers after the material is as confusing to me as before.
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#4
jabbadap
M is for mobile or what!?
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#5
HopelesslyFaithful
Frick said:
I feel this is pretty pointless. The numbers after the material is as confusing to me as before.
I am now totally lost. I finally started to sorta understand xeon number naming but now have to start all over :/
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#6
Brusfantomet
its the same as i3, i5 and i7 for consumer market then.
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#7
iO
34 CPUs and those dont even include the Silver and Bronze series.
As if like 20 different models wouldnt be enough to cover every use case...
Posted on Reply
#8
Ripper3
iO said:
34 CPUs and those dont even include the Silver and Bronze series.
As if like 20 different models wouldnt be enough to cover every use case...
I don't think Intel will ever be able to cover every use case, hence why co processors are becoming more popular, and there's a gap in the market for ARM and IBM POWER CPUs in servers. They're probably just trying to get ahead early, and cover as much of the market as possible.
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#9
XiGMAKiD
Intel Xeon Titanium
Intel Xeon Platinum
Intel Xeon Gold
Intel Xeon Silver
Intel Xeon Bronze
Intel Xeon
Posted on Reply
#10
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Ripper3 said:
I don't think Intel will ever be able to cover every use case, hence why co processors are becoming more popular, and there's a gap in the market for ARM and IBM POWER CPUs in servers. They're probably just trying to get ahead early, and cover as much of the market as possible.
That is why they bought Altera.
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