Wednesday, August 9th 2017

Six Million Marvell-powered Kingston SSDs Ship, Companies Collaborate Further

Kingston Digital, Inc., the Flash memory affiliate of Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced over 6 million SSD units between the Kingston and HyperX lines have shipped worldwide featuring Marvell controllers. The feat was accomplished in just over two years as the HyperX Predator PCIe SSD in February 2015 was the company's first SSD to ship utilizing a Marvell controller. Marvell's 88SS9293 controller provides lightning fast, next generation SSD performance making HyperX Predator PCIe SSD a must have for system-builders and enthusiasts.

Wanting to offer users of all levels the benefits of high performance from an SSD, Kingston released UV400, powered by Marvell's 88SS1074 four-channel controller in May of 2016. As the product family evolves later this year, Kingston will launch the UV500 series, its first 3D NAND-enabled SSD utilizing Marvell's newest 88SS1074 full turnkey (FTK) solution. UV500 will be available in 2.5", M.2 and mSATA form factors providing solutions for any consumer and system builder SSD needs. It is designed for mainstream client use but also has 256-bit AES encryption and TCG Opal 2.0 enabled for enterprise users as well.
"Marvell is proud of the success in our collaboration with Kingston, and is excited to be extending it with our first in-house developed FTK solution on our 88SS1074 controller," said Nigel Alvares, VP of SSD & Enterprise Storage Marketing, Storage Group, Marvell. "Kingston's UV500 will be able to offer industry-leading 3D NAND performance, endurance, data integrity and reliability using our third generation of NANDEdge technology, the industry's most advanced low-density parity check (LDPC) error correction platform available, and integrated in all of our latest SATA, SAS and PCIe controllers."

"We are happy with the work we've achieved with the Marvell team to deliver higher performance and quality products to our customers; and, to have reached such a mark like 6 million SSDs shipped in such a short time," said Ariel Perez, SSD business manager, Kingston. "We're looking to keep that 'units shipped' number growing with this next generation drive series utilizing 3D NAND and Marvell's full turnkey solution. UV500 will deliver excellent performance and reliability for both consumer and system builder users."
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12 Comments on Six Million Marvell-powered Kingston SSDs Ship, Companies Collaborate Further

#1
silentbogo
Even Kingston themselves are so happy that they've dropped Phison in favor of Marvell, that they had to make a press-release about it. :D
Now, gimme my flashdrive replacements!
Posted on Reply
#2
_JP_
They didn't drop Phision in favor of Marvell, the KC400, KC1000 and Savage drives still use those controllers.
All I see from this PR is "We're continuing to use Marvell for the same line of SSDs!! The 88SS9293 is very FAST!! No disclosure on the NAND though!!! But we're not gonna bait and switch!!" :p
Posted on Reply
#3
silentbogo
_JP_ said:
They didn't drop Phision in favor of Marvell, the KC400, KC1000 and Savage drives still use those controllers.
...and some soon-to-be-replaced mSATA and M.2 SATA SSDs. But what I really mean, is that only few years ago they used to put 3110-S10 in every imaginable SSD, from UV300 to "Enthusiast" HyperX Savage.
The performance of that controller is not bad by any means, but the quality... Highly unreliable.
What's worse, you can't even buy Phison controllers separately, otherwise I would've had a nice bonus to my income from SSD/Flashdrive repair and data recovery.
Posted on Reply
#5
_JP_
silentbogo said:
...and some soon-to-be-replaced mSATA and M.2 SATA SSDs. But what I really mean, is that only few years ago they used to put 3110-S10 in every imaginable SSD, from V300 to "Enthusiast" HyperX Savage.
The performance of that controller is not bad by any means, but the quality... Highly unreliable.
What's worse, you can't even buy Phison controllers separately, otherwise I would've had a nice bonus to my income from SSD/Flashdrive repair and data recovery.
Noted.
Well...I do backup regularly, but I'm using two models of those SSDs :D:(
Posted on Reply
#6
trparky
silentbogo said:
...and some soon-to-be-replaced mSATA and M.2 SATA SSDs. But what I really mean, is that only few years ago they used to put 3110-S10 in every imaginable SSD, from UV300 to "Enthusiast" HyperX Savage.
The performance of that controller is not bad by any means, but the quality... Highly unreliable.
What's worse, you can't even buy Phison controllers separately, otherwise I would've had a nice bonus to my income from SSD/Flashdrive repair and data recovery.
Wait. What? What are you talking about? Are you saying that the Marvell's 88SS1074 controller is shit? Or the Phison? :confused:
Posted on Reply
#7
silentbogo
trparky said:
Wait. What? What are you talking about? Are you saying that the Marvell's 88SS1074 controller is shit? Or the Phison? :confused:
Definitely phison.
I think out of all semiconductor manufacturers my least favorite are Phison and AsMedia. Maybe it's just my bad luck, or statistical probability (given that both are frequently used in cheap devices), but either way I'm disappointed.
Posted on Reply
#8
trparky
silentbogo said:
Definitely phison.
I think out of all semiconductor manufacturers my least favorite are Phison and AsMedia. Maybe it's just my bad luck, or statistical probability (given that both are frequently used in cheap devices), but either way I'm disappointed.
Thanks for the clarification.
Posted on Reply
#9
Hood
silentbogo said:
I think out of all semiconductor manufacturers my least favorite are Phison and AsMedia. Maybe it's just my bad luck, or statistical probability (given that both are frequently used in cheap devices), but either way I'm disappointed.
I didn't know that Phison controllers had a problem with reliability. I do recall a lot of complaints about AsMedia SATA and USB controllers, but lately they seem to be better. Thanks for the info, nothing worse than having an SSD with plenty of life left, but it can't be seen because of controller chip failure (my very first SSD, an OCZ Vertex 3, had this problem after 14 days, crappy Sandforce 2281 controller died. Any thoughts on Sandforce?
Posted on Reply
#10
_JP_
silentbogo said:
(given that both are frequently used in cheap devices)
My Savage wasn't exactly "cheap" :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#11
silentbogo
Hood said:
Any thoughts on Sandforce?
Didn't really have much experience with sandforce. Still have Kingston V300, which also uses SF2281. Heard some failure stories, but at least mine is kicking at 100% health.
No issues, no failures, no rumored speed degradation.

_JP_ said:
My Savage wasn't exactly "cheap" :ohwell:
Though, it's basically a UV300 in a fancier enclosure. :roll:
Posted on Reply
#12
_JP_
silentbogo said:
Though, it's basically a UV300 in a fancier enclosure. :roll:
Right, but with MLC instead of TLC. :D And I remember now, I did get it with a discount and before prices hiked...:peace:
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