Friday, December 8th 2017

Toshiba Reveals the World's First 14TB HDD with Conventional Magnetic Recording

Toshiba Electronic Devices & Storage Corporation today announced the launch of the MG07ACA Series, the world's first enterprise 14TB Conventional Magnetic Recording (CMR) HDD. Using a 9-disk, helium-sealed design, the new MG07ACA Series provides the power-efficient capacity and storage density needed by cloud-scale and enterprise storage solution providers to achieve their TCO objectives.

"We have raised the bar with the new MG07ACA Series 9-disk helium-sealed design," said Akitoshi Iwata, Vice President of Storage Products Division, Toshiba Electronic Devices and Storage Corporation. "By utilizing an innovative design, we continue to improve the benefits that high-capacity disk storage can deliver to our broad global customer base."
The MG07ACA Series features both 14TB 9-disk and 12TB 8-disk models. The helium-sealed 3.5-inch mechanical design realizes better storage density and a lower HDD operating power profile than the previous MG06ACA Series for optimal TCO in cloud-scale infrastructures. The series also utilizes Toshiba Group's laser welding technology to ensure the helium remains securely sealed inside the drive enclosure. The drives support a SATA 6Gbit/s interface and 7,200rpm access performance. The 9-disk 14TB models achieve a 40% increase in maximum capacity over previous MG06ACA 10TB models. Additionally, the 14TB models improve power efficiency by over 50% (W/GB).

"Toshiba Electronic Devices & Storage's first helium-sealed nearline drive intercepts the market at a class-leading 14TB capacity with CMR," said John Chen, industry analyst at Trend Focus. "Its early time-to-market for this capacity positions the company well to meet the storage needs of large hyperscale and cloud companies. Additionally, the company's choice of a 9-disk platform paves the way to achieving higher capacities in future product generations."

"While enterprise server and storage customers realize that shingled magnetic recording (SMR) technology can improve HDD capacity, the adoption of SMR HDD products into server and storage systems is a transition that will take several years," according to John Rydning, Research Vice President for hard disk drives at IDC. "Toshiba Electronic Devices & Storage's new helium-sealed enterprise HDD is the world's first 14TB of storage capacity using conventional rather than shingled magnetic recording technology, giving enterprise customers the highest capacity HDD available in the market today for existing server and storage system architectures."
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13 Comments on Toshiba Reveals the World's First 14TB HDD with Conventional Magnetic Recording

#1
Chaitanya
Interested in 4/5 platter drive based on that density.
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#2
RejZoR
There is a big problem with these drives. And that's the price. They are by no means cheap and for the money they ask for these drives, you can get a massive SSD (smaller, but still massive). In which case one needs to ask themselves, do you really need this much space for porn or do you value speed and still have plenty of capacity with a lightning fast SSD? I'm talking full SSD systems here, not some SSD boot drive nonsense.
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#3
dj-electric
RejZoR said:
There is a big problem with these drives. And that's the price. They are by no means cheap and for the money they ask for these drives, you can get a massive SSD (smaller, but still massive). In which case one needs to ask themselves, do you really need this much space for porn or do you value speed and still have plenty of capacity with a lightning fast SSD? I'm talking full SSD systems here, not some SSD boot drive nonsense.
A 12TB HDD will set you back 450$. For 550$ you can buy a 2TB SSD. 2TB isn't 12TB, no matter how fast.
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#4
Chloe Price
At least there's some space for cat pictures.
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#5
RejZoR
Dj-ElectriC said:
A 12TB HDD will set you back 450$. For 550$ you can buy a 2TB SSD. 2TB isn't 12TB, no matter how fast.
But then, do you really need 12TB of pr0n you're never going to watch anyway? Or just 2TB of quality one at lightning speeds? I'm steering away from car analogies since most people seem to hate them XD
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#6
Easo
RejZoR said:
But then, do you really need 12TB of pr0n you're never going to watch anyway? Or just 2TB of quality one at lightning speeds? I'm steering away from car analogies since most people seem to hate them XD
It's for enterprises. Full SSD storage is stupidly expensive right now, so no, people will choose the 14 TB instead of 2, even if it is slower.
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#7
Gasaraki
RejZoR said:
There is a big problem with these drives. And that's the price. They are by no means cheap and for the money they ask for these drives, you can get a massive SSD (smaller, but still massive). In which case one needs to ask themselves, do you really need this much space for porn or do you value speed and still have plenty of capacity with a lightning fast SSD? I'm talking full SSD systems here, not some SSD boot drive nonsense.
pOrn.
Posted on Reply
#8
Gasaraki
RejZoR said:
But then, do you really need 12TB of pr0n you're never going to watch anyway? Or just 2TB of quality one at lightning speeds? I'm steering away from car analogies since most people seem to hate them XD
I guess you're right. I have a lot of midget porn so the file sizes are not that big.
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#9
TheTechGuy1337
These are enterprise grade HDD so they are more for servers. They are meant more for business and much less for consumers. Enterprise grade equipment gets put through the ringer involving testing devices for intense workloads. Hard drive manufactures make sure that these higher graded products are more reliable for businesses all around. This causes the price for these products to be much higher than a standard consumer grade product. Consumer grade products still get tested too, but no where near on the scale of enterprise equipment. Companies are far more willing to spend the extra money for more reliability. I think you are comparing consumer grade SSD to enterprise grade HDD. These are in two different leagues. Enterprise grade SSD cost more than consumer grade SSD as well.

The best analogy that I can think of is as follows: It's like comparing a fully loaded Honda Civic, with a 4 cyclinder, sunroof, and full tech package to a Honda Civic SI with a vtech 4 cylinder, manual windows, standard stereo, and stock rims. Sure, the civic si is going to be faster with that vtech engine, but does the SI sound right for a company car?
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#10
piloponth
Chaitanya said:
Interested in 4/5 platter drive based on that density.
I second you. 6-7TB is more than enough, but I want it to be the latest tech (density, cache) and not SMR.
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#11
gmn 17
8K movies here we come
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#12
Fahim
RejZoR said:
But then, do you really need 12TB of pr0n you're never going to watch anyway? Or just 2TB of quality one at lightning speeds? I'm steering away from car analogies since most people seem to hate them XD
With technology, our storage requirements also have increased. A 2TB SSD maybe fast, but it is no match for a 14TB drive in terms of capacity. 4K contents are more common now, and each movies are like 50GB+. Raw photographs from a DSLR camera reached almost 100MB in size. I'd say we need big drives more than a speedy 2tb ssd. And for data that needs fast fetching there are no alternatives for ssd but they are not a replacement for the other.
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#13
RejZoR
How many people hoard 4K movies or are passionate photographers? Not many I'd say. And even if they are, they are most likely actually storing all this on an external HDD which can be a regular spinning one since random access doen't matter there all that much when you access 99% of content from it sequentially anyway.
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