Friday, January 5th 2018

Plugable's Latest Thunderbolt 3 External SSD Drive Delivers Amazing Performance

Plugable's new 480GB external NVME SSD drive hits performance levels not possible before Thunderbolt 3. Connect the drive to a Thunderbolt 3 port to gain 480GB of extra storage with amazing speeds of up to 2400+ MB/sec read and 1200+ MB/sec write, all without the need for an external power connection. These speeds make this external drive a no-compromise performance solution for video editing, backup, and any tasks which demand maximum disk performance. "Thunderbolt 3 is a revolutionary technology," said Bernie Thompson, CEO of Plugable Technologies. "We've created our line of high-end docks, adapters, and drives to show it off."

"Plugable's new external drive makes the most of the performance and power provided by Thunderbolt 3," said Jason Ziller, General Manager, Client Connectivity Division at Intel. "Thunderbolt 3 enables portable drives like this to hit peak performance, all over a single Thunderbolt 3 cable."

The drive is compatible with all Thunderbolt 3-enabled PCs and laptops, including the new Apple* MacBook Pro*. Thunderbolt 3 supports up to 40 Gbps throughput and the Plugable drive makes use of that bandwidth to operate at the maximum speed of its high-performance, built-in 480GB M.2 SSD. The solution offers speeds much higher than can be achieved by USB 3.1 Gen 2, which is limited to 10 Gbps. And it's all powered by Thunderbolt 3 over one USB-C cable - no external power adapter is required.

The Plugable 480GB Thunderbolt 3 drive is expected in Q1 2018. Learn more at plugable.com/products/tbt3-nvme480.
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15 Comments on Plugable's Latest Thunderbolt 3 External SSD Drive Delivers Amazing Performance

#1
bonehead123
word 1:

Sammy

word 2:

Evo Pro 960 = 3000/2000

w/o cables, cases or other b.s

Word 3:

Meh....
Posted on Reply
#2
thebeephaha
Long time TPU forum member here, and senior Plugable engineer. If anyone has any questions definitely feel free to ask me anything.

TPU moderators - if this isn't allowed just let me know.
Posted on Reply
#3
mohammed2006
thebeephaha
Long time TPU forum member here, and senior Plugable engineer. If anyone has any questions definitely feel free to ask me anything.

TPU moderators - if this isn't allowed just let me know.
If i connect the Thunderbolt 3 on a usb c gen2 on my motherboard will i get the top speed of the drive
Posted on Reply
#4
ZeDestructor
thebeephaha
Long time TPU forum member here, and senior Plugable engineer. If anyone has any questions definitely feel free to ask me anything.

TPU moderators - if this isn't allowed just let me know.
Any chance we could get these as empty M.2 and U.2 chassis as well as prebuilt drives? I tend to cycle down my SSDs into removable storage as I upgrade in general.
Posted on Reply
#5
thebeephaha
mohammed2006
If i connect the Thunderbolt 3 on a usb c gen2 on my motherboard will i get the top speed of the drive
No, this drive requires Thunderbolt 3, it is not backwards compatible with regular USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 or 2.
ZeDestructor
Any chance we could get these as empty M.2 and U.2 chassis as well as prebuilt drives? I tend to cycle down my SSDs into removable storage as I upgrade in general.
At this time, no. Sorry!
Posted on Reply
#6
Prima.Vera
The problem is, I cannot find anywhere in this world, a PCIE card with 1 or 2 Thunderbolt 3 interfaces. I mean this is really ridiculously stupid.
Posted on Reply
#7
thebeephaha
Prima.Vera
The problem is, I cannot find anywhere in this world, a PCIE card with 1 or 2 Thunderbolt 3 interfaces. I mean this is really ridiculously stupid.
Well Thunderbolt 3 isn't designed to be added on after the fact. I mean it can be if the motherboard chipset has the inherent support for it built in (some of the ASUS Workstation boards have add on cards), but if your computer doesn't have that ability, you'll unfortunately need to upgrade your motherboard.
Posted on Reply
#8
Prima.Vera
thebeephaha
Well Thunderbolt 3 isn't designed to be added on after the fact. I mean it can be if the motherboard chipset has the inherent support for it built in (some of the ASUS Workstation boards have add on cards), but if your computer doesn't have that ability, you'll unfortunately need to upgrade your motherboard.
This is even more stupid and retarded if you are right. Since it's based on PCI Express, how come it cannot be added as a separate add-on card on any motherboard with PCIE 3.0 x4 slot!?!?!??
Posted on Reply
#9
thebeephaha
Prima.Vera
This is even more stupid and retarded if you are right. Since it's based on PCI Express, how come it cannot be added as a separate add-on card on any motherboard with PCIE 3.0 x4 slot!?!?!??
Because there are inherent underlying technologies that need to be supported by the motherboard chipset and CPU to allow for Thunderbolt 3. You can't just tack on a TBT3 controller to any system. USB-C and TBT3 are quite complex, there's a ton of interconnecting technologies.

Basically you need an Intel Skylake system or newer. So select high end Z170 motherboards and up. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbolt_(interface)#Thunderbolt_3
Posted on Reply
#10
Prima.Vera
thebeephaha
Because there are inherent underlying technologies that need to be supported by the motherboard chipset and CPU to allow for Thunderbolt 3. You can't just tack on a TBT3 controller to any system. USB-C and TBT3 are quite complex, there's a ton of interconnecting technologies.

Basically you need an Intel Skylake system or newer. So select high end Z170 motherboards and up. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbolt_(interface)#Thunderbolt_3
Isn't possible to just have a dedicated separated controller except the one on the CPU and/or chipset? There are hundreds of dedicated USB3.1 cards out there that works on any CPU/chipset as long as it has PCIE slots.... I'm asking because I can find a lot of external dedicated cards for Thunderbolt 1 and 2 but not for 3 that works on any system.
Posted on Reply
#11
bug
I have a thing for looking down on sequential transfer numbers being quoted for NVMe drives, but this is one of the few cases where these are actually relevant. Because it's very likely you'll use these to transfer large amounts of data to/from them,
Posted on Reply
#12
thebeephaha
Prima.Vera
Isn't possible to just have a dedicated separated controller except the one on the CPU and/or chipset? There are hundreds of dedicated USB3.1 cards out there that works on any CPU/chipset as long as it has PCIE slots.... I'm asking because I can find a lot of external dedicated cards for Thunderbolt 1 and 2 but not for 3 that works on any system.
Yep, and that is because USB 3.1 cards are just for USB data. Thunderbolt 3 cards also need to provide video through DisplayPort, and support connecting external PCIe devices.
bug
I have a thing for looking down on sequential transfer numbers being quoted for NVMe drives, but this is one of the few cases where these are actually relevant. Because it's very likely you'll use these to transfer large amounts of data to/from them,
That's our thought as well, and we've rounded those numbers down a little bit as well. We expect content creators will be one of our larger audiences, but these are great for doing image backups and restores as well.
Posted on Reply
#14
gregpop
Prima.Vera
The problem is, I cannot find anywhere in this world, a PCIE card with 1 or 2 Thunderbolt 3 interfaces. I mean this is really ridiculously stupid.
If did not find yet the ThunderBolt 3 card adapter I send you an address from Newegg.com (www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813995053) and one from Europe,from Germany (www.alternate.de/ASUS/ThunderboltEX-3-Card-Schnittstellenkarte/html/product/1282013). Althogh you can Write this on Google (ThunderboltEX 3 Card ) and you find this card .it have an USB-C 40Gb/s connector,one USB-Type A connector what is only 10 Gb/s and an Mini Display connector.it is around $100 (Dollars)
All the best.
greg
Posted on Reply
#15
Prima.Vera
Thanks! But I have a Z77 chipset, so no go for me...:rolleyes:
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