Thursday, February 22nd 2018

ASUS Intros GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti Cerberus Series Graphics Cards

ASUS rolled out GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti Cerberus series graphics cards. Much like the GTX 1070 Ti Cerberus card launched late-2017, these cards come with 144-hour burn-in quality-control by ASUS, and are targeted at gaming iCafes. The GTX 1050 Ti Cerberus (model: CERBERUS-GTX1050TI-O4G) comes with 4 GB of memory, while the GTX 1050 Cerberus (CERBERUS-GTX1050-O2G) comes with 2 GB.

Both cards are based on an identical board design, featuring a 17 cm long full-height PCB, and a monoblock aluminium GPU heatsink that's ventilated by a pair of IP5X-certified (dust resistant) 80 mm fans. A 3+1 phase VRM with ASUS' highest grade Super Alloy Power II chokes power the card. Both cards rely on the PCI-Express slot for power. Display outputs include one each of dual-link DVI-D, HDMI 2.0b, and DisplayPort 1.4 connectors. Both cards are factory-overclocked, with the GTX 1050 Ti Cerberus shipping with 1341/1455 MHz (core/GPU Boost), and an untouched 7.00 GHz (GDDR5-effective) memory; while the GTX 1050 Cerberus ships with 1404/1518 MHz (core/GPU Boost). The company didn't reveal pricing.
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7 Comments on ASUS Intros GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti Cerberus Series Graphics Cards

#1
Supercrit
Backplate on a 1050, I guess they make enough profit on these to justify it.
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#2
Chaitanya
"Supercrit said:
Backplate on a 1050, I guess they make enough profit on these to justify it.
It can be a plastic backplate but still nice to see a backplate on 1050 series of cards for a change.
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#3
sutyi
Why bother putting two fans on this with a big shroud?

The heatsink / finstack underneath is just terrible. I personally wouldn't touch these with a 10 feet barge pole...
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#4
Zenskas
"sutyi said:

The heatsink / finstack underneath is just terrible.
Agreed!! It's a nice enough looking card on the surface but that heatsink underneath the fans/shroud is pitiful. I'm sure the low 75W TDP will be fine for the cooler to handle but they could have done much better for even lower temps/noise considering it appears to be a more "premium" budget product to the untrained eye.

I have two of the older ASUS GTX 750 Ti Strix cards which run an even lower 60W TDP, while there is no backplate on my cards I'll take the bigger heatsink and dual copper heat pipes instead thank you :p
Years after I purchased them they both still run a dream when used for HTPC/casual gaming duties and are extremely cool and quiet cards.
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#5
ShurikN
Looks like the fans are cooling the pcb more than the heatsink... ridiculous.
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#6
Casecutter
"sutyi said:
The heatsink / finstack underneath is just terrible. I personally wouldn't touch these with a 10 feet barge pole...
Wow, I though I'd be the first to comment on that H-S hard to call it that! Looks more looks like some Die-Cast crap material. While I get what they are looking for long term use durability and two slow fans will survive better than one faster one, it also probably is that the pot-metal "lub" needs all the help it came get. Then a Ti that has only PCIe power, though calling OC'd and still under the 75W limit. Stock was 1291/1392Mhz (core/GPU Boost), these are just above 4% OC (1341/1455 MHz); though I guess those are the clocks Asus has used on the DUAL GTX 1050 Ti OC and hasn't a 6pin. I find it a little strange they condensed the PCB down to reference size, even the DUAL GTX 1050 Ti OC spreads out on a longer board.

Fine for gaming iCafes in China, but not something I'd as general consumer for gaming would see as attractive.
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#7
lZKoce
The boxart alone pushes FPS the card makes with 5% . :D
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