Monday, July 9th 2018

Arctic Announces Market Availability of New Alpine Passive Series Heatsinks

Dark, reliable, affordable - these are ARCTIC's new CPU coolers, the Alpine AM4 Passive and the Alpine 12 Passive. Both passive coolers are available now and provide silent cooling for the AMD AM4 platform as well as for PC's with an Intel 115X base. The active coolers in other Alpine series will likewise be replaced with newly developed models during the course of the year.

The Alpine AM4 Passive and the Alpine 12 Passive operate fanless and completely silent, yet they are powerful enough to cool all compatible CPUs up to 47 watts. The black anodization of the aluminum heat sink is not just an optical improvement: the heat dissipation of the heat sink is also increased through anodic oxidation.
Black Anodization for Improved Heat Dissipation
Since dust cannot settle on the Alpine AM4 Passive and the Alpine 12 Passive coolers, they can be used for years without needing maintenance. Applying MX-2 Thermal Compound beforehand ensures a quick and clean installation process.

Main Facts Alpine AM 4 Passive / Alpine 12 Passive
  • Completely silent due to passive operation
  • Dustless and maintenance free
  • Pre-applied MX-2 thermal paste
  • Black anodising for improved heat dissipation
The Alpine 12 AM4 Passive and Alpine 12 Passive are available now at Amazon.co.uk at a price of GBP 13.99 MSRP.
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15 Comments on Arctic Announces Market Availability of New Alpine Passive Series Heatsinks

#1
AnarchoPrimitiv
Reminds me of the heatsink that came with my first PC back in 1997 (I think), had an Intel Pentium 233 Mhz with MMX (think that was all hype)...I actually remember that the fan on that heatsink died at one point and I went to CompUSA (anyone remember that place?) to get a new one as this is during the primordial days of the internet....that PC came with 32 MB of EDO RAM, a 4.3GB HDD, 56.6K modem, a creative soundblaster AWE64 sound card, and I believe it at an ATI videocard with 4MB of VRAM...oh yeah, and a 1x CR-RW and since it was 1x speed, that mean that the length of time required to write an audio CD was equivalent to the duration of the CD itself, so if it had 74 minutes worth of music, it took 74 minutes to write....I tell you, kids that were born into the era of ubiquitous broadband don't know how spoiled they are as during the days of dialup I remember I'd considerit it a "good day" if my actual download rate was ≈4.5KB/s, about 40 minutes to download a 3 minute mp3 which I had to obtain by logging onto unpublicized servers (you could only get the address if you were "in the know") on IRC....hell, I remember I downloaded a bootleg of the Matrix when it first debuted in theaters and it took multiple days to download via FTP....anyone remember IRC, Warez or FTP downloads?
Posted on Reply
#2
lynx29
Why do they still make Arctic MX-2 thermal paste when they have advertised for 5 years that MX-4 is better? lol I will never understand that company
Posted on Reply
#3
Chloe Price
lynx29 said:
Why do they still make Arctic MX-2 thermal paste when they have advertised for 5 years that MX-4 is better? lol I will never understand that company
Maybe they still have that so much on stock, that it's wise to give that with coolers instead of the better MX-4?
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
Passive is theoretically perfect for HTPC. But can you find the space for this in a HTPC?
Posted on Reply
#6
Basard
AnarchoPrimitiv said:
Reminds me of the heatsink that came with my first PC back in 1997 (I think), had an Intel Pentium 233 Mhz with MMX (think that was all hype)...I actually remember that the fan on that heatsink died at one point and I went to CompUSA (anyone remember that place?) to get a new one as this is during the primordial days of the internet....that PC came with 32 MB of EDO RAM, a 4.3GB HDD, 56.6K modem, a creative soundblaster AWE64 sound card, and I believe it at an ATI videocard with 4MB of VRAM...oh yeah, and a 1x CR-RW and since it was 1x speed, that mean that the length of time required to write an audio CD was equivalent to the duration of the CD itself, so if it had 74 minutes worth of music, it took 74 minutes to write....I tell you, kids that were born into the era of ubiquitous broadband don't know how spoiled they are as during the days of dialup I remember I'd considerit it a "good day" if my actual download rate was ≈4.5KB/s, about 40 minutes to download a 3 minute mp3 which I had to obtain by logging onto unpublicized servers (you could only get the address if you were "in the know") on IRC....hell, I remember I downloaded a bootleg of the Matrix when it first debuted in theaters and it took multiple days to download via FTP....anyone remember IRC, Warez or FTP downloads?
You musta been rich... not rich enough to spring for 64 megs though. Neither were we. :P
Posted on Reply
#7
Chloe Price
bug said:
Passive is theoretically perfect for HTPC. But can you find the space for this in a HTPC?
Why not? All HTPCs aren't NUC size little boxes. :P
Posted on Reply
#8
bug
Chloe Price said:
Why not? All HTPCs aren't NUC size little boxes. :p
I was genuinely asking. Idk how big a HTPC mob is or how much clearance it needs for RAM and other stuff around the CPU socket.
Posted on Reply
#9
ShurikN
With the dissipation power of 47W it can only cool 2 chips on AM4 platform, 2200GE and 2400GE both in the 35W range.
Posted on Reply
#10
bug
ShurikN said:
With the dissipation power of 47W it can only cool 2 chips on AM4 platform, 2200GE and 2400GE both in the 35W range.
More like zero chips, since both the 2200GE and 2400GE seem to be merely announced atm, with no availability to speak of.
But other AM4 chips can be run in TDP constrained mode that this heatsink should be able to handle.
Posted on Reply
#11
natr0n
Just add 2x 80-92mm fans on both sides with a zip tie.
Posted on Reply
#12
Fx
Chloe Price said:
Why not? All HTPCs aren't NUC size little boxes. :p
This may be true for people that have cabinets for their HTPC, but all of mine are compact and usually rest behind my TV screen.
Posted on Reply
#13
stanleyipkiss
I just ordered two of these. One for a 7600T and the second as a spare. You never know.
Posted on Reply
#14
Chloe Price
ShurikN said:
With the dissipation power of 47W it can only cool 2 chips on AM4 platform, 2200GE and 2400GE both in the 35W range.
Don't forget those crappy Bristol Ridge old gen APUs. :D
Posted on Reply
#15
ShurikN
Only 3 Bristol Ridge apus are 35W, rest are 65. So that's a total of 5 chips, 2 of which are hard to find, and the rest are borderline crap. Hard to find a point for this cooler for AM4.
65W would be a totally different story.
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