Tuesday, October 2nd 2018

Razer Announces the Sila Gaming Grade Wi-Fi Router

Razer , the leading global lifestyle brand for gamers, today announced the Razer Sila, a high-performance WiFi router designed for home users requiring WiFi service optimized for high-performance gaming, streaming and downloading multimedia content. With the upsurge in mobile gaming, and with many homes unable to run a wired network to every room, fast and reliable WiFi is more important than ever. The Razer Sila router is designed to deliver lag-free gaming and smooth, interruption-free streaming over a fast wireless network, meeting the needs of today's mobile, console and laptop users.

The Razer Sila features a suite of technologies designed to give gamers the fastest, most reliable WiFi connection within their home or office with Razer FasTrack, Multi-Channel ZeroWait DFS and Mesh capability with a dedicated backhaul. Setup and management through a mobile app makes Sila installation and use simple and quick. The Razer FasTrack software featured in the Razer Sila is a proprietary QoS engine for smart traffic management. By using deep packet inspection and adaptive learning technology, Razer FasTrack allows users to prioritize traffic based on application and device types, from mobile phones and smart TVs through to laptops, PCs or consoles. With built-in detection for PlayStation, Xbox and Switch consoles, users can easily fine tune their networks for the smoothest gaming or streaming experiences. Razer FasTrack also features a one-touch gaming mode, to automatically reserve bandwidth for online gaming.
"We are constantly achieving new performance heights with our hardware and software," notes Min-Liang Tan, Razer co-founder and CEO. "But high precision and low latency can be rendered useless if the WiFi drops. So we took the next step to develop a strong foundation for our ecosystem; with WiFi that just works no matter where you are."

The patented Multi-Channel Zero-Wait DFS technology in the Razer Sila enables clean WiFi channels to avoid network traffic and maintain the highest speeds for the most demanding applications, without the susceptibility to downtime, hanging and disconnection.

The Razer Sila router is also capable of advanced mesh networking. Two or more Razer Sila units can be combined to provide smooth, fast, WiFi coverage across areas up to 6,000 square feet with two units or multi-storey locations over 6,000 square feet with three units. As a Tri-Band router Razer Sila features a dedicated 5 GHz backhaul and independent fronthaul links operating on up to 4 simultaneous DFS channels which further reduces interference and network congestion.

The Razer Sila was developed in collaboration with wireless home networking partner Ignition Design Labs-the technology and engineering firm founded by alumni of networking giants Qualcomm and Broadcom. Ignition Design Labs is best known for launching the award-winning Portal Smart WiFi router in 2016.

"Razer demands the very best in engineering, design and performance. We are thrilled to be Razer's design partner, applying our engineering expertise and patented technologies to build a uniquely powerful pro-grade router for the world's foremost gaming and entertainment ecosystem," said Terry Ngo, CEO of Ignition Design Labs.

Product Features:
  • Razer FasTrack - Intelligent continuously adaptive QoS with Deep Packet Inspection prioritizes applications & devices for high-speed gaming & streaming
  • Multi-Channel ZeroWait DFS - Get additional bandwidth on protected fast channels for reliable, interference-free, lag-free connections
  • Tri-Band Mesh with Dedicated Backhaul - For widespread coverage with maximum performance
  • Intelligent Active Steering - Ensures client devices are always connected to the strongest signal
  • App and Smart Software Support - iOS & Android app with advanced features for guest network & security controls
  • Price: USD $249.99 / EU €299.99
  • Availability:
    o Razer.com - 3rd October, 2018
    o Worldwide - 3rd October, 2018
Specifications:

Wireless Interfaces
  • Tri-Band AC3000
  • IEEE 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac
  • 11n 2.4GHz: up to 400 Mbps
  • 11ac 5GHz-1: up to 1734 Mbps
  • 11ac 5GHz-2: up to 866 Mbps
Encryption
  • WPA / WPA2-PSK
Antennae
  • 9 x powerful internal high-gain internal antennae
Wired Interfaces
  • 4 Gigabit Ethernet (1x WAN, 3x LAN)
  • 1 x USB 2.0 port
  • 1 x USB 3.0 port
For more information, visit the product page.
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34 Comments on Razer Announces the Sila Gaming Grade Wi-Fi Router

#1
hat
Enthusiast
How odd, only 3 lan ports... 4 has been the standard since I first connected to the internet.
Posted on Reply
#2
AsRock
TPU addict
hat, post: 3915205, member: 32804"
How odd, only 3 lan ports... 4 has been the standard since I first connected to the internet.
Unless it's Apple :p, funny thought, just maybe it's a Apple with a few alterations.

Probably just some one else copying Apple's bad idea's again.
Posted on Reply
#3
notb
Funny how a pure gaming brand can make a good looking, minimalist router.

At the same time all-round companies try hard to accent their gaming products...
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#4
Dimi
If this had 6-8 lan ports, i'd buy it. Kinda done with asus ac crap.
Posted on Reply
#5
hat
Enthusiast
notb, post: 3915235, member: 165619"
Funny how a pure gaming brand can make a good looking, minimalist router.

At the same time all-round companies try hard to accent their gaming products...

At least we can agree on this. The Razer router at least doesn't look like a robotic tarantula. I just wish it at least had 4 lan ports.
Posted on Reply
#6
Vayra86
So do I log in to Synapse BEFORE or AFTER connecting to the internet?

Hmmmmm
Posted on Reply
#7
Ubersonic
I've noticed recently that routers sold in the USA don't seem to ever have modems built in like regular domestic routers (never any RJ11 ports for ADSL/VDSL) are you guys required to use the hardware supplied by your ISP in addition to your own router (as opposed to instead of your ISP's router) then?
Posted on Reply
#8
hat
Enthusiast
Ubersonic, post: 3915269, member: 153458"
I've noticed recently that routers sold in the USA don't seem to ever have modems built in like regular domestic routers (never any RJ11 ports for ADSL/VDSL) are you guys required to use the hardware supplied by your ISP in addition to your own router (as opposed to instead of your ISP's router) then?
I can't comment on anything DSL, but we do indeed have those modem/router combos you speak of. As for your other question, that depends. Most ISPs offer their equipment with the option to use your own. My ISP, Armstrong, forces you to use their modem, but you can use your own router. If you pay for their "Zoom Share" service, you get their modem/router combo box.

Come to think of it, I have seen modems in service that had RJ11 ports on it, but that was for Armstrong's phone service. It was a total ripoff though at $30/month. I pay less than that for an entire year of service with MagicJack.
Posted on Reply
#9
Tsukiyomi91
funny... the word "sila" means "please" in Bahasa Melayu... so, it's called "Razer Please"?? XD
Posted on Reply
#10
Octopuss
Take some crap that normally cost less than $100, add completely useless features to it, slap "gaming" sticker on it, and profit while idiots keep buying it for three times as much.
Posted on Reply
#11
hat
Enthusiast
The price definitely sticks out (not in a good way). Years ago, I paid $130 for my RT-N66R, and it wasn't a budget model by any means...
Posted on Reply
#12
bonehead123
Octopuss, post: 3915281, member: 74316"
Take some crap that normally cost less than $100, add completely useless features to it, slap "gaming" sticker on it, and profit while idiots keep buying it for three times as much.
^^^What he/she said^^^ :)

But, but....wait for it, wait for it.....

it aint got no friggin R.G.B. , so how the hell can they justify that outrageous price ?
Posted on Reply
#13
Ferrum Master
I like the warning in the small print.
WARNING: This product can expose you to chemicals including diethylhexyl phthalate(DEHP), which is known to the State of California to cause cancer. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.
Posted on Reply
#14
TheLostSwede
Most likely Qualcomm Atheros based hardware, similar to the Netgear Orbi, but with the Qualcomm game accelerator software on it.
Posted on Reply
#15
hat
Enthusiast
Ferrum Master, post: 3915309, member: 90058"
I like the warning in the small print.
I don't see this exposing you to any carcinogens... unless you set it on fire.
Posted on Reply
#16
AsRock
TPU addict
Ubersonic, post: 3915269, member: 153458"
I've noticed recently that routers sold in the USA don't seem to ever have modems built in like regular domestic routers (never any RJ11 ports for ADSL/VDSL) are you guys required to use the hardware supplied by your ISP in addition to your own router (as opposed to instead of your ISP's router) then?
With Comcast your not locked in with a single unit or to a 2 in one, how ever you will be limited on a list of cable modem's available which work with their network and pretty free on what router to use.

Last time i looked their was about 50+ different ones that you can use with Comcast which i can pair with what ever router may it be a $10 or a really exspenive one.

Don't want that only one you can use and 2 in one crap, which i believe Verizon are.

As others have said it does look good but nope still would not buy it, it's frigging Razer, never mind only having 3 ports.

Ferrum Master, post: 3915309, member: 90058"
I like the warning in the small print.
Hehe, to be fair though CA has so many warnings for things to the point it's gotten really crazy, Kinda makes you think how much toxicity there is though all your devices used in our days and find warning's on so many things these days.

At least you do not have to eat it ::P, safe but is it safe in numbers after adding multiple things.
Posted on Reply
#17
remixedcat
Ubersonic, post: 3915269, member: 153458"
I've noticed recently that routers sold in the USA don't seem to ever have modems built in like regular domestic routers (never any RJ11 ports for ADSL/VDSL) are you guys required to use the hardware supplied by your ISP in addition to your own router (as opposed to instead of your ISP's router) then?
depends on the ISP and your living aarrangement. some apartment complexes require you to use their internet and their hardware. this is why I chose not to e in Cincinnati around the year 2007. it seemed as if a large portion of the SE side used some odd forsaken cable co that was white labelled to them. Dunno if it's still a thing in that region or not.
Posted on Reply
#18
hat
Enthusiast
AsRock, post: 3915324, member: 40310"
Hehe, to be fair though CA has so many warnings for things to the point it's gotten really crazy, Kinda makes you think how much toxicity there is though all your devices used in our days and find warning's on so many things these days.

At least you do not have to eat it ::p, safe but is it safe in numbers after adding multiple things.
I have a feeling that warning gets slapped on things when it's not even applicable. There's a reason I said "unless you set it on fire".

Plastic, as a finished product, could hardly expose you carcinogens... but under certain conditions, it could. With injection molding presses, there is a part of the process done when changing material and/or color called "purging". The barrel is heated to around 900 degrees, which quickly removes most of the old material from the barrel, making it reasonably clean for the new material/color to come through without wasting a lot of time and material making bad parts which have the old material (left in the barrel, if it weren't purged) mixed with the new material. When plastics are heated to that level, it gives off a lot of smoke, and a nasty smell. That I can see releasing carcinogens, but I doubt anybody is going to get cancer from this router, or any other plastics... unless you're setting them on fire all the time.
Posted on Reply
#19
sepheronx
notb, post: 3915235, member: 165619"
Funny how a pure gaming brand can make a good looking, minimalist router.

At the same time all-round companies try hard to accent their gaming products...

Isn't this something (platform) that people back then used to sacrifice virgins on to please the gods?
Posted on Reply
#20
tvamos
Tsukiyomi91, post: 3915274, member: 129086"
funny... the word "sila" means "please" in Bahasa Melayu... so, it's called "Razer Please"?? XD
Sila means "force" in Croatian and Serbian, possibly other slavic languages too.
Posted on Reply
#21
TheLostSwede
Ubersonic, post: 3915269, member: 153458"
I've noticed recently that routers sold in the USA don't seem to ever have modems built in like regular domestic routers (never any RJ11 ports for ADSL/VDSL) are you guys required to use the hardware supplied by your ISP in addition to your own router (as opposed to instead of your ISP's router) then?
Just FYI, Razer are based out of Singapore. Most people there have fibre to the home, so no need for a modem.
Posted on Reply
#22
E-curbi
sepheronx, post: 3915355, member: 16941"
Isn't this something (platform) that people back then used to sacrifice virgins on to please the gods?
Ginger-headed virgins? I like where this is going. :p

Back to the router... "But where are the antennae? antennaa? "

Already have enough square boxed shapes in the office, this router from Linksys with blue LEDs looks more Batman, more Dark Knight to me. :)
Posted on Reply
#23
Dave65
Tried many Razor products, all failed in a very short time, I'll pass.
Posted on Reply
#24
therealmeep
Interested to see a new addition in the "too expensive to justify" segment, goes right along with my asus AC5300 (bought it in a pinch because firmware was screwy on my AC3200) Once you get to the 100$ price point on routers, there really is no improvement on the router part, however they do add in little things here and there like the extra wifi radios on the Asus "spider" line of routers.
Posted on Reply
#25
E-curbi
Dave65, post: 3915393, member: 82235"
Tried many Razor products, all failed in a very short time, I'll pass.
Guess I'll say this again, maybe it will help someone decide or look into a new purchase.

Had great experiences with Razer mousing mats. The aircraft aluminum Razer Manticore was outstanding for me from 2012 to 2017. Now rocking the New Razer Invicta Mercury Edition in white, prefer hard mats, not soft. Soft mats are too darn slow and sluggish, my work desk surface by itself is faster.

I prefer a nice low-latency high speed mousing mat. lol :D

Technically superior surfaces for getting work done with Logitech MX Master 2S and MX Vertical mice. Like out of this world smooth and slick, some engineering buddies think I'm exaggerating, then they try the combo, and WOW!

Logitech MX Master 2S + Razer Invicta (4 colors available) + you must clean the surface with Isopropyl-based hand sanitizer daily = A mousing experience you've only dreamed of.


I'm only a seldom gamer but yea the Razer Invicta Mercury works extremely well with Doom 2016 also. :)
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