Tuesday, October 3rd 2017

AMD President and CEO Dr. Lisa Su to Keynote at CES 2019

The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) today announced that AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) President and CEO Dr. Lisa Su will deliver a keynote address at the upcoming CES 2019. Dr. Su's address is scheduled for Wednesday, January 9 at 9:00 AM in the Venetian Palazzo Ballroom. Owned and produced by CTA, CES 2019, the world's largest innovation event, will run January 8-11, 2019 in Las Vegas.

In 2019, AMD will catapult computing, gaming, and visualization technologies forward with the world's first 7nm high-performance CPUs and GPUs, providing the power required to reach technology's next horizon. During her CES keynote, Dr. Su and guests will provide a view into the diverse applications for new computing technologies ranging from solving some of the world's toughest challenges to the future of gaming, entertainment and virtual reality with the potential to redefine modern life.

"AMD is transforming the future of computing in our ever-expanding digital world and revolutionizing the $35 billion gaming industry," said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO, CTA. "We look forward to Dr. Su's keynote as she paints a picture of the next-generation of computing that will help redefine the future of gaming and virtual entertainment."

Dr. Su is AMD president and chief executive officer and serves on the company's board of directors. Previously, Dr. Su held executive leadership and engineering positions with AMD, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. and IBM after receiving her bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In 2017, she was named one of the "World's 50 Greatest Leaders" by Fortune Magazine and the "Top Ranked Semiconductor CEO" by Institutional Investor Magazine. Under Dr. Su's leadership, AMD has introduced two completely new chip architectures and more than ten different product families, resulting in double-digit annual revenue growth in 2017.

Dr. Su's address marks the first CES keynote from AMD in show history. She joins IBM chairman, president and CEO Ginni Rometty as confirmed CES 2019 keynote speakers. Additional CES keynotes will be announced in the coming weeks. Visit the CES Keynote page for the latest updates.

CES is the largest and most influential technology event on the planet, featuring 4,500 exhibitors across 2.75 million net square feet of exhibit space. The 2018 event attracted 182,198 attendees, including a record 63,784 international attendees, according to the official show audit. The show provides access to the very latest transformative tech such as 5G connectivity, artificial intelligence, augmented and virtual reality, smart home, smart cities, sports and machine intelligence, as well as new areas for 2019 including tourism and resilience.

Registration for CES 2019 is now open.
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11 Comments on AMD President and CEO Dr. Lisa Su to Keynote at CES 2019

#1
Prima.Vera
btarunr said:
In 2019, AMD will catapult computing, gaming, and visualization technologies forward with the world's first 7nm high-performance CPUs and GPUs, providing the power required to reach technology's next horizon.
What GPUs are we expecting from AMD next year? Any more details regarding that please?
Posted on Reply
#2
quadibloc
This announcement, of course, shows a great deal of confidence that TSMC can actually deliver 7nm parts. If Intel can't make the similar parts that they call 10nm, why would anyone else be able to surmount the electromigration issues at that size?
Posted on Reply
#3
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Prima.Vera said:
What GPUs are we expecting from AMD next year? Any more details regarding that please?
Vega 20 most likely.
Posted on Reply
#4
Mysteoa
Prima.Vera said:
What GPUs are we expecting from AMD next year? Any more details regarding that please?
Polaris 30 and depending on the development either Navi or Vega 20
Posted on Reply
#5
medi01
Prima.Vera said:
What GPUs are we expecting from AMD next year?
Mid range Navi at 7nm and some sort of Navi in PS5 for Xmas.
Posted on Reply
#6
BorgOvermind
quadibloc said:
This announcement, of course, shows a great deal of confidence that TSMC can actually deliver 7nm parts. If Intel can't make the similar parts that they call 10nm, why would anyone else be able to surmount the electromigration issues at that size?
Because progress is made by those that think ahead, not by the ones copy-pasting.
Posted on Reply
#7
Vayra86
BorgOvermind said:
Because progress is made by those that think ahead, not by the ones copy-pasting.
Intel's fabs and development of process technology was always ahead of everyone else. And they figured that all out by themselves. Guess who copied them? Even their 14nm and 10nm processes are unique to this day. And they're the one company with a somewhat realistic representation of node development. TSMC's 7nm can barely be called that by any standard.

I've said this as well: 7nm really isn't as close as many think it is. Just because there is a 7nm chip in an Iphone doesn't mean they 'can just make a bigger and faster one' for everything else.

Until mass produced 7nm high performance product is actually on shelves, its wise to be skeptical. At this moment the worst you can say of Intel is that they're up-front about their problems, IMO.


Considering that, I think its telling that AMD is betting everything on a node shrink. No word of radical changes, just mostly word of shrinking what they already have. Oh yeah, and there is some distant noise about this unicorn called Navi. When? How? What? Nobody knows. That speaks volumes for a competitor that is fast losing its grip on an entire marketplace called dedicated GPU. If you want to keep playing the game, you would be firing on all cylinders to keep people interested and tease what's coming. Its a big contrast: Nvidia adapted Turing to fit it into a 12nm process, AMD can only make a move if 7nm is even available. No backup because everything bigger will run into problems or simply isn't worth the effort. That's rather painful if you ask me.

This keynote is going to be very interesting, and ironically, mostly for what Lisa Su will *not* say.
Posted on Reply
#8
BorgOvermind
Of course it was ahead, [USER=152404]Vayra86[/USER]. They have infinite R&D budget compared to any of the others. There would of been no excuse if that would not of happened.

A bigger and faster chip will indeed involve many issues. Even other processes have low enough yields not to be used at their full possibilities - look at nV's 2k series that are now arriving. They ended up well enough without fully using the chip. And don't worry, Turing is more marketing than practice. Most of the problems AMD has on the gaming side are not actually technical in nature. They were most of the time technically ahead. In my area mobile Radeons lack availability a lot, for example.
Posted on Reply
#9
medi01
Vayra86 said:
Oh yeah, and there is some distant noise about this unicorn called Navi. When? How? What? Nobody knows.
Yeah, nobody knows. 1h 2019 for Navi, yeah, so distant, nobody knows

Vayra86 said:
7nm really isn't as close as many think it is. Just because there is a 7nm chip in an Iphone
Yeah, merely Vega 20, expected in December this year.
https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/amd-7nm-vega-by-december-not-a-die-shrink-of-vega-10.247006/

So, why would anyone reading this site say so? Ah, the that green reality distortion field...

Oh wait, who's comment is that:



Sadness indeed.

Vayra86 said:
a competitor that is fast losing its grip on an entire marketplace called dedicated GPU
As seen by market share changes! Oh, wait....
Posted on Reply
#10
Vayra86
medi01 said:
Yeah, nobody knows. 1h 2019 for Navi, yeah, so distant, nobody knows


Yeah, merely Vega 20, expected in December this year.
https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/amd-7nm-vega-by-december-not-a-die-shrink-of-vega-10.247006/

So, why would anyone reading this site say so? Ah, the that green reality distortion field...

Oh wait, who's comment is that:



Sadness indeed.


As seen by market share changes! Oh, wait....
You need to re-read my comments on 7nm I think. Once again you have chronic problems with reading comprehension. If you're ready to shell out for a workstation class GPU, be my guest.

All we're heard is 'maybe's' when it comes to AMD GPU releases. They don't even bother putting anything substantial on a roadmap anymore. You get a rough estimate by full years and not even per quarter. That alone speaks volumes.
Posted on Reply
#11
medi01
Vayra86 said:
You need to re-read my comments on 7nm I think.
You don't seem to remember what on earth you were typing.

Vayra86 said:
f you're ready to shell out for a workstation class GPU, be my guest.
In your earlier post you have cast doubt on 7nm being matured. What does "shelling out money for workstation GPU" have anything to do with it?
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