Friday, October 5th 2018

Windows 10 Oct 2018 Update Process Runs Aground with Certain Intel Processors, Fix Released

Microsoft earlier this week released Windows 10 October 2018 (version 1809) update. You can either get it through Windows Update, and install it leaving your personal files and settings largely unchanged, or perform a clean install by making yourself an install media using Microsoft's Media Creation Tool. PC Watch noticed something curious about getting the new Windows version through Windows Update on their notebook. The process was sapping too much power from the battery, and the update process is interrupted by an incompatible driver dialog (screenshot below).

Intel processors running with Gen 9.5 iGPUs enabled (that's 6th generation "Skylake" or later), expose an integrated audio controller to the operating system. This controller is responsible for digital audio output through the iGPU's HDMI and DisplayPort connectors, and is similar to the one NVIDIA and AMD integrate with their discrete GPUs. Users with driver version 10.25.0.3 or older for this controller, could run into problems when Windows Update is re-loading the drivers as part of the upgrade process. Intel has since released driver version 10.25.0.10 part of the latest Graphics Drivers 25.20.100.6323. If you're still on Windows 10 version 1803 and use your iGPU, it's recommended that you update your Intel graphics drivers before initiating Windows Update to version 1809.
Source: PC Watch
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34 Comments on Windows 10 Oct 2018 Update Process Runs Aground with Certain Intel Processors, Fix Released

#1
TheLostSwede
For whatever reason, it also killed Origin on my PC and even re-installing it doesn't make it work properly...
Not sure what's going on, but it was fine up until this update.
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#2
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
I remember a time when I could actually trust a Windows Update. It has been so many years since I trusted anything they released. We just upgraded all our machines at work to Windows 10 1803 and it's been an utter nightmare, and continues to not work properly in a corporate environment.
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#3
Vayra86
What the f. Its 2018 and we're getting a repeat of Vista with all of its driver woes. With audio no less... HELLO!?
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#4
erixx
no biggie! (for a watching poweruser, that is...)
it seems part of the pre-install checking. so you just follow the instructions. Abort update. Go get driver update first, then update windows.
With windows 10 updates are just sooo smooth, we get accustomed to it!
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#5
huguberhart
"TheLostSwede said:
For whatever reason, it also killed Origin on my PC and even re-installing it doesn't make it work properly...
Not sure what's going on, but it was fine up until this update.
Killed how? Ther's been a problem with some EA servers this week, so maybe that's why it wasn't working for you?
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#6
R0H1T
"RCoon said:
I remember a time when I could actually trust a Windows Update. It has been so many years since I trusted anything they released. We just upgraded all our machines at work to Windows 10 1803 and it's been an utter nightmare, and continues to not work properly in a corporate environment.
That's why they need to include *eternal beta tag in the release notes. Strangely the insider builds even on the fast ring (not skip ahead) are generally solid, I've been an "insider" since before win8 was released & they were horrible IMO. Win10 is generally solid, in comparison, though it can bork a few AVs every now & then.
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#7
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
"RCoon said:
I remember a time when I could actually trust a Windows Update. It has been so many years since I trusted anything they released. We just upgraded all our machines at work to Windows 10 1803 and it's been an utter nightmare, and continues to not work properly in a corporate environment.
Yeah. People bash MS for all sorts of stupid reasons but this is certinaly something should be bashed for. The only issue I've personally had was when an update bricked an AMD laptop (making it unable to boot even in safe mode), but it seems for most major updates they miss something that really should not have been missed.
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#9
VulkanBros
Hmm...is it me or is it, in the majority of errors/inconveniences, in connection with Windows 10 major updates, always Intel thats targeted?

Could be, I am wrong tho
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#10
TheLostSwede
"huguberhart said:
Killed how? Ther's been a problem with some EA servers this week, so maybe that's why it wasn't working for you?
As in, it was working fine before the update and after the update Origin either just craps out, can't find an internet connection or throws random errors. The only thing I changed, was to upgrade to the new Windows update.
Even the Origin uninstaller craps out... fun fun fun...
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#11
Vayra86
"VulkanBros said:
Hmm...is it me or is it, in the majority of errors/inconveniences, in connection with Windows 10 major updates, always Intel thats targeted?

Could be, I am wrong tho
Well, more fixes and mitigations have been deployed for Spectre/Meltdown towards Intel CPUs but it would be good to separate that from the regular flow altogether (Windows hasn't got a lot to do with that). What I'm mostly seeing is that applications and Windows 10 updates run into conflicts. That and drivers for all sorts of hardware. We've also seen it with Nvidia cards for example.

Given the massive amounts of configurations out there, you could say they're still doing quite alright. But when you remove control from end users, you better make sure its perfect. And its really not. There is a good chance MS will have to change its update policies and provide more options to end users... which inevitably leads us back to Windows 7/8 situations in terms of security.
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#12
IceScreamer
Can someone fill me in please? Did stuff like this happen when Windows 7 was starting, I wasn't very active then. I'm planning to install W10 for the first time on my laptop and stuff like this is keeping me away. I always see threads (not on here specifically) with updates breaking things and whatnot.
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#13
Vayra86
"IceScreamer said:
Can someone fill me in please? Did stuff like this happen when Windows 7 was starting, I wasn't very active then. I'm planning to install W10 for the first time on my laptop and stuff like this is keeping me away. I always see threads (not on here specifically) with updates breaking things and whatnot.
No it didn't instead we had 'Service Packs' and if you lacked those, sucks to be you because you would have a super insecure, unstable PC. The problem back then was actually installing it without issues. Those issues were big enough for MS to release Windows 7 with pre-installed service pack versions. In a practical sense the best way to do it was 'clean install' with a service pack included. Remarkably similar to how the automatic process does it with 10.

Google top hits provide some nice insight

https://www.google.nl/search?q=Windows+7+Service+Pack+issues&rlz=1C1GCEA_enNL780NL780&oq=Windows+7+Service+Pack+issues&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.5762j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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#14
IceScreamer
"Vayra86 said:
No it didn't instead we had 'Service Packs' and if you lacked those, sucks to be you because you would have a super insecure, unstable PC. The problem back then was actually installing it without issues. Those issues were big enough for MS to release Windows 7 with pre-installed service pack versions. In a practical sense the best way to do it was 'clean install' with a service pack included. Remarkably similar to how the automatic process does it with 10.

Google top hits provide some nice insight

https://www.google.nl/search?q=Windows+7+Service+Pack+issues&rlz=1C1GCEA_enNL780NL780&oq=Windows+7+Service+Pack+issues&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.5762j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Yea I knew about service packs, wasn't sure whether there were issues like these then. I might as well pull the trigger on W10.
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#15
Tsukiyomi91
Well, one can always take the clean install route if one doesn't mind backing their stuff up & spending hours to make sure it doesn't screw up...
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#16
Prince Valiant
"Vayra86 said:
No it didn't instead we had 'Service Packs' and if you lacked those, sucks to be you because you would have a super insecure, unstable PC. The problem back then was actually installing it without issues. Those issues were big enough for MS to release Windows 7 with pre-installed service pack versions. In a practical sense the best way to do it was 'clean install' with a service pack included. Remarkably similar to how the automatic process does it with 10.

Google top hits provide some nice insight

https://www.google.nl/search?q=Windows+7+Service+Pack+issues&rlz=1C1GCEA_enNL780NL780&oq=Windows+7+Service+Pack+issues&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.5762j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Service pack installs were always slow but I've never had one fail.
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#17
neatfeatguy
The Win10 updates are odd.

Fall Creator update just destroyed Windows on my HTPC. Couldn't boot into safe mode and couldn't repair. I had to wipe and clean install. The last update (1803) - no issues that I encountered.

My mom's work laptop, when updated to 1803 the audio completely stopped working and she had video issues. I had to re-install the audio and video drivers.

I don't understand what the hell MS does, but they're pretty good at f'ing stuff up when they push out these big updates. I'm hesitant to put Win 10 on my gaming system because of the issues these updates can give users.
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#18
Jism
Signs of people losing data in their documents folder, too. All over the news yesterday. I find it funny that MS targets it's consumers as public beta testers.
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#19
BrainCruser
"erixx said:
no biggie! (for a watching poweruser, that is...)
it seems part of the pre-install checking. so you just follow the instructions. Abort update. Go get driver update first, then update windows.
With windows 10 updates are just sooo smooth, we get accustomed to it!
Oh, yeah super duper smooth. One of these updates made windows boot on my system for 5 minutes, on a nvme ssd. It did the same for my brother, and several other computers.
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#20
TheOne
I still think they should do yearly updates, spend 6-8 months developing and then the last beta testing, then release.

Also with the file deletion bug rumored I'm glad I only installed this on my secondary desktop.
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#21
biffzinker
The update didn't cause any issues for me but it did remove the RX 480 audio controller driver for HDMI/DisplayPort. Wouldn't let me re-install the driver without a complete uninstall through AMD Software Manager.
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#23
lexluthermiester
Gee wiz, yet another Windows update that causes problems.. :fear: what.. a.. shocker.. :rolleyes:

"Melvis said:

This, yes..

"Vayra86 said:
What the f. Its 2018 and we're getting a repeat of Vista with all of its driver woes. With audio no less... HELLO!?
This also! It's almost as if Microsoft can't figure out how to do real-world testing before deployment.. Oh, right.. We're the test subjects..

And people wonder why I disable Windows update as a general practice.. :kookoo:
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#24
jaggerwild
I was reading at Guru, windows updates where breaking overclocking....
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#25
R0H1T
"jaggerwild said:
I was reading at Guru, windows updates where breaking overclocking....
You must've missed the other thread at TPU but IIRC it's just x99 or a couple of HEDT generations?
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