Tuesday, October 23rd 2018

ARCTIC releases P-Fan Series High-static Pressure With Six Fan Models

ARCTIC today expanded its range of case fans with the new P Series. The high-static pressure fan line consists of six models, each available in 120mm and 140mm versions. The P-Fans are engineered to maximize the cooling potential of radiators. Their newly designed fan blades enable a focused airflow, which makes them an ideal choice on heatsinks and radiators with higher air resistance.

In addition to the new impeller design, the PWM Models of the P Series (including the BioniX) also feature a new, highly efficient motor technology. Thanks to the Neodym-Iron-Boron-Magnet ring of the latest generation, the fans run smoothly and with notably less operating noise and vibration from commutation without compromising performance and service life.
The fan speed of up to 2100 RPM (BioniX P120) can be regulated steplessly for the PWM models and with the new motor, the fans switch into a silent passive mode when PWM signal is below 5 %.

All models (except for the PWM PST CO) come with ARCTIC's trusted high quality bearings that achieve great efficiency. The alloy/lubricant combination reduces friction and contributes to a significantly prolonged service life.
The P12 PWM PST CO and P14 PWM PST CO high performance fans are specifically designed for continuous operation. Their high-precision dual ball bearing reduces rotational friction considerably making it up to 5 times more durable than other bearings.

Availability
All 120 mm versions of the P-Fans (except the P12) are available now at the ARCTIC Webshop and on Amazon. The 140 mm fans and the P12, along with the BioniX P120 and BioniX P140 pressure-optimized gaming fans, will be available in the coming weeks. Sources: Arctic Bionix P120, Arctic P12, Arctic P12 PWM
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9 Comments on ARCTIC releases P-Fan Series High-static Pressure With Six Fan Models

#2
Mighty-Lu-Bu
On their website, it lists the 140mm variant as having a noise rating of 0.6 sone... how does that translate to dBA?
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#3
Mayclore
"Gaming fan"

Please stop, this is getting ridiculous.
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#4
LocutusH
They look like rebranded cooler master fans...
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#5
Athlonite
LocutusH, post: 3928178, member: 150559"
They look like rebranded cooler master fans...
I would have said more like a Gentle Typhoon but with a smaller motor
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#6
MrGenius
Mighty-Lu-Bu, post: 3928150, member: 171210"
On their website, it lists the 140mm variant as having a noise rating of 0.6 sone... how does that translate to dBA?
25.5 ~ 27 dBA
http://www.shuttle.eu/_archive/old/en/www.shuttle.eu/index-1095.html

BTW, which site are you finding these on? I can't find them here.
https://www.arctic.ac/us_en/products/cooling/case-fan.html

EDIT: I found some mention of them here.
https://www.arctic.ac/us_en/products/cooling/case-fan/p-fans.html

And some more specific details here.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Arctic-P12-Silent-Pressure-optimised-Extra/dp/B07GB16RK7/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1540297804&sr=8-3&keywords=arctic+p12&th=1

Nothing about the 140mm variants though. So that noise rating might not be entirely accurate. But it's probably pretty close if not.
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#7
skates
Airflow: 56.3 CFM / 95.65 m³/h (@ 1 800 RPM)

That seems decent at 1800 RPM vs. 2500
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#8
Athlonite
Mighty-Lu-Bu, post: 3928150, member: 171210"
On their website, it lists the 140mm variant as having a noise rating of 0.6 sone... how does that translate to dBA?
Conversion. According to Stevens' definition, a loudness of 1 sone is equivalent to the loudness of a signal at 40 phons, the loudness level of a 1 kHz tone at 40 dB SPL.

A "Sone" isn't really an exact conversion to dbA it about how the sound is perceived not how loud the sound is think of it like this you enjoy the sound of rain drumming on your roof but a tap dripping in the quiet soon becomes bloody annoying that's the sone measurement
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#9
Mighty-Lu-Bu
Athlonite, post: 3929690, member: 80893"
Conversion. According to Stevens' definition, a loudness of 1 sone is equivalent to the loudness of a signal at 40 phons, the loudness level of a 1 kHz tone at 40 dB SPL.

A "Sone" isn't really an exact conversion to dbA it about how the sound is perceived not how loud the sound is think of it like this you enjoy the sound of rain drumming on your roof but a tap dripping in the quiet soon becomes bloody annoying that's the sone measurement
Yeah I saw a weird conversion chart- 1 sone = 28 dBA so I am assuming that .6 sone is even less making these fans have one of the highest airflow ratings I have seen with a very low dBA rating. This makes the fans a very, very solid choice. I might pick some up haha
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