Friday, November 23rd 2018

Microsoft Halts Windows 10 October Update Rollout Yet Again, Affects Only Some Intel Users

Microsoft has blocked rollout of the Windows 10 October 2018 Update on systems using Intel Integrated Graphics with specific driver versions. Apparently audio playback, when using a monitor connected to the IGP, will no longer work after the upgrade to October Update.

According to Microsoft, the underlying reason for the issue is that "Intel inadvertently released versions of its display driver [...] to OEMs that accidentally turned on unsupported features in Windows."

If you want to work around this, then check your Intel driver version using GPU-Z. If you see "24.20.100.6344" or "24.20.100.6345", just upgrade your graphics drivers and you should be good to go.
Source: Microsoft
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49 Comments on Microsoft Halts Windows 10 October Update Rollout Yet Again, Affects Only Some Intel Users

#1
hat
Enthusiast
"unsupported features"

Is that what we call bugs these days?
Posted on Reply
#2
Vayra86
Cool, its nearly December already
Posted on Reply
#3
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
If the problem has been caused by a third party, then surely it shouldn't impact Microsoft's rollout? At most, the installer can check for the driver version and prompt for an updated one before installing the October update. I suspect that there's more to this than Microsoft is letting on.
Posted on Reply
#4
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Testing's what customers are for!
Posted on Reply
#5
ONEoo7
If you've ever worked on a project with more than a few thousand lines of code you will understand that there is no such thing as flawless software.
One cannot expect this from non technical users, but nonetheless... There is so much hate going around when someone f**** up, it disgusts me.
Take NVIDIA RTX and M$ october update as examples. People can't wait for a reason to hate. Just a wonderful reminder of what human beings really are.

Cheers.
Posted on Reply
#6
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
ONEoo7 said:
If you've ever worked on a project with more than a few thousand lines of code you will understand that there is no such thing as flawless software.
One cannot expect this from non technical users, but nonetheless... There is so much hate going around when someone f**** up, it disgusts me.
Take NVIDIA RTX and M$ october update as examples. People can't wait for a reason to hate. Just a wonderful reminder of what human beings really are.

Cheers.
Couldn't agree more with this sentiment. There's so many people around with a chip on their shoulders.
Posted on Reply
#7
Vayra86
ONEoo7 said:
If you've ever worked on a project with more than a few thousand lines of code you will understand that there is no such thing as flawless software.
One cannot expect this from non technical users, but nonetheless... There is so much hate going around when someone f**** up, it disgusts me.
Take NVIDIA RTX and M$ october update as examples. People can't wait for a reason to hate. Just a wonderful reminder of what human beings really are.

Cheers.
Well honestly, if you've worked on a software project you also know that bringing non-functional features to products is not going to end well, and before you know it, technical debt is higher than you can manage. In this particular case its good that MS is holding off. Agile development is great fun, but the end result is a userbase that is getting fed up with it all. Not a day goes by without some feature not working as advertised. Not exactly the goal of agile development, but a very real by-product nonetheless.

And let's not forget these companies represent the top of the food chain, either... this performance isn't really representative of it.
Posted on Reply
#8
ONEoo7
Vayra86 said:
Well honestly, if you've worked on a software project you also know that bringing non-functional features to products is not going to end well, and before you know it, technical debt is higher than you can manage. In this particular case its good that MS is holding off. Agile development is great fun, but the end result is a userbase that is getting fed up with it all. Not a day goes by without some feature not working as advertised. Not exactly the goal of agile development, but a very real by-product nonetheless.

And let's not forget these companies represent the top of the food chain, either... this performance isn't really representative of it.
Agree, but let's not forget there is a thing called time and budget and these things do not allow for perfection. The fact that they are relatively fast to ack problems and try to fix them should be appreciated. I would also propose that whenever a new software update is rolled out they should notify the user updating that something might go wrong and BACKUP before and also a method of immediately reporting the problem introduced by the update(maybe they do that already but I don't have time to read agreements, my bad here).
I have had the notorious desktop stutter/hang issue on a notebook with intel igpu and nvidia dgpu hybrid graphics, it has taken M$ + Intel a lot of time to fix it but they did it in the end. One of the solutions was to rollback to a previous win 10 version. I chose to use only nv gpu instead.
Posted on Reply
#9
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
ONEoo7 said:
If you've ever worked on a project with more than a few thousand lines of code you will understand that there is no such thing as flawless software.
One cannot expect this from non technical users, but nonetheless... There is so much hate going around when someone f**** up, it disgusts me.
Take NVIDIA RTX and M$ october update as examples. People can't wait for a reason to hate. Just a wonderful reminder of what human beings really are.

Cheers.
Actually, instead of blindly supporting MS like a lemming, you might first get your facts in order. MS did away with its QA people. This is why they have several tiers of update distribution. That’s right, customers are the QA guinea pigs.

I’d say that’s a good reason for hate to be flowing around on MS. Especially if you have thousands of lines of code to compile correctly.
Posted on Reply
#10
Vayra86
ONEoo7 said:
Agree, but let's not forget there is a thing called time and budget and these things do not allow for perfection. The fact that they are relatively fast to ack problems and try to fix them should be appreciated. I would also propose that whenever a new software update is rolled out they should notify the user updating that something might go wrong and BACKUP before and also a method of immediately reporting the problem introduced by the update(maybe they do that already but I don't have time to read agreements, my bad here).
I have had the notorious desktop stutter/hang issue on a notebook with intel igpu and nvidia dgpu hybrid graphics, it has taken M$ + Intel a lot of time to fix it but they did it in the end. One of the solutions was to rollback to a previous win 10 version. I chose to use only nv gpu instead.
Time and budget are exactly those things the customer has zero influence on, and the service provider does. Why is that our problem? Microsoft isn't offering me a discount either because they saved all that money on testing and I've sent them bug reports.

Honestly, the bottom line will never change. If you release something it better be good. And you'd better be on the money with fixing what isn't good, and every day you fail to do that, you can expect that it costs you money and goodwill. That's how the world works, and not the way you propose it does, by being apologetic towards one another because its oh-so-difficult to do it right. If its too difficult, you're doing the wrong job or the job is managed in the wrong way. End of story. Nvidia's RTX is another shining example of it. Every day we haven't seen a nice bit of content to convince us this is truly worthwhile, is a day Nvidia takes flak for their ridiculous plan.
Posted on Reply
#11
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Maybe i should go back to windows 7 :cry::cry::cry:
Posted on Reply
#12
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
I'm glad that on a regular basis I'm getting validation that jumping ship from the Windows bandwagon wasn't a bad idea. :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#13
Vya Domus
ONEoo7 said:
If you've ever worked on a project with more than a few thousand lines of code you will understand that there is no such thing as flawless software.
You'd also know that it is possible to release said software within a reasonable time frame if everything is properly taken care of. If that's not happening, repeatedly, it is safe to assume that whoever was in charge screwed up.
Posted on Reply
#14
Tsukiyomi91
at least MS managed to find more problems with this update & stops rolling it out (again).
Posted on Reply
#15
BorgOvermind
I guess they forgot to mention some things a little more important than audio, like:
- breaking the OS at login screen (login then black screen forever)
- breaking compatibility with various anti-virus software
- breaking compatibility with document encryption software
Posted on Reply
#16
sixor
meh, using OCT and NOV ISOs with no problems at all
Posted on Reply
#17
Fleurious
My station at work was just “upgraded” to Windows 10 from Win 7... what horrible OS Win10 is. At least from XP to Vista you could see the potential despite the early teething problems.
Posted on Reply
#18
Vayra86
BorgOvermind said:
I guess they forgot to mention some things a little more important than audio, like:
- breaking the OS at login screen (login then black screen forever)
- breaking compatibility with various anti-virus software
- breaking compatibility with document encryption software
Yep, +1 on the black screen after login. I didn't bother fixing it yet because reboot takes all of 15 seconds, but this is Windows 10 then, huh. Good to know.
Posted on Reply
#19
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
rtwjunkie said:
Actually, instead of blindly supporting MS like a lemming, you might first get your facts in order. MS did away with its QA people. This is why they have several tiers of update distribution. That’s right, customers are the QA guinea pigs.

I’d say that’s a good reason for hate to be flowing around on MS. Especially if you have thousands of lines of code to compile correctly.
hmmmm.... good point, rtw. I've revised my opinion in light of this, which I'd forgotten about.

There's zero excuse for a company not to have a QA department, especially a behemoth like Microsoft.
Posted on Reply
#20
Turmania
Windows 7 was the best ever. If I could turn back I would.
Posted on Reply
#21
efikkan
It's understandable that some obscure bugs slip through QA in massive software bundles, but a company of the size of Microsoft should have established some routines to catch the obvious stuff after all these years.

hat said:
"unsupported features"

Is that what we call bugs these days?
This one always feels relevant when the PR departments are doing damage control.

Frick said:
Testing's what customers are for!
Who needs testing?
Real men do it in production!
Posted on Reply
#22
silentbogo
So far I haven't seen even a mention of an 1809 update on any of my machines on either "release" period... Kinda feel left-out and depressed about it.... :laugh:
The only thing I've noticed, though, is that one of the recent minor updates brought back my normal sound levels, which I lost sometime around 16xx updates (and it's not related to the new headphone virtualization function).
Maybe by the time 1809 finally gets released they'll include fixes for blurry icons in the taskbar and nagging notifications...
Posted on Reply
#23
lexluthermiester
At this point it would be better to cancel the update all together and roll out everything in the spring update. That presumes that they'll stop making themselves look like amateur monkey's diddling a football and actually do some testing before releasing. This is why the "Windows as a service" thing is a crap idea.
Posted on Reply
#24
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
lexluthermiester said:
This is why the "Windows as a service" thing is a crap idea.
It certainly pushed me away. I never had these kinds of problems with Windows 7. Hell, I don't have these kinds of problems with OS X either on my laptop for work.
Posted on Reply
#25
Reeves81x
Ha hahaha.... what else can be said.

Aquinus said:
It certainly pushed me away. I never had these kinds of problems with Windows 7. Hell, I don't have these kinds of problems with OS X either on my laptop for work.
yep, I'm still using Win7 on all of my current systems. Still the best OS M$ ever released imho.
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