Tuesday, November 28th 2017

Intel Detailing Their Arctic Sound Discrete GPU This December; Aiming for 2020

According to DigiTimes, Intel's top graphics executive Raja Koduri and other senior Intel partners will be hosting a discrete GPU-focused conference this December. The conference aims to instill confidence in shareholders and customers alike in that Intel is pursuing its high-performance discrete entry into the graphics card market at a fast pace. The GPU architecture, codenamed Arctic Sound, is expected to debut by 2020, aiming for the gaming, AI, and machine learning sectors - much like any GPU solution these days. It remains to be seen which details - if any - can be gleaned from this conference, but we'll keep you up to date when those surface.
Source: DigiTimes
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36 Comments on Intel Detailing Their Arctic Sound Discrete GPU This December; Aiming for 2020

#1
Vayra86
Right. So their GPU (video output) line is called 'Sound'.

Much sense is being made.
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#2
R0H1T
Let's hope Intel haven't ripped anything off AMD following the recent (talent) acquisitions!
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#3
Zubasa
R0H1T said:
Let's hope Intel haven't ripped anything off AMD following the recent (talent) acquisitions!
Intel is already using GCN in the Vega M series products.
Also details are not known about Intel and AMD's cross licencing deal so they might actually legally use some of the patents.
Posted on Reply
#4
R0H1T
Zubasa said:
Intel is already using GCN in the Vega M series products.
Also details are not known about Intel and AMD's cross licencing deal so they might actually legally use some of the patents.
That was a wrong move IMO, under the aegis of Raja IIRC.
Posted on Reply
#5
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Zubasa said:
Intel is already using GCN in the Vega M series products.
AMD sells Intel Vega + HBM2 chips to MCM with Intel's Hades Canyon processors. All Intel needs to know about it is power envelope and how many PCIe lanes it needs.
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#6
TurboFEM
Willing to bet my a** it comes out on 14nm
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#7
BakerMan1971
Tentatively looking forward to seeing what Intel can produce.
If we get something as good value as the old i740 then I would be happy.
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#8
Ubersonic
Looking forward to this :)

Will be awesome once Intel's GPUs hit the scene, with AMD/Intel supporting Freesync it means Nvidia will have no choice but to finally support it (officially, I know there's workarounds). And as a bonus Nvidia will also have no choice but to stop disabling PhysX on their cards if the primary GPU is AMD (as doing it for AMD and not Intel would be lawsuit territory).

There's a bright propitiatory free future ahead :D
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#10
Bwaze
aiming for the gaming, AI, and machine learning sectors
And cryptomining, don't forget cryptomining!
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#12
Gorstak
not sure....that dude in blue suit does instill confidence...
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#13
micropage7
Oops first i think arctic entering soundcard
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#14
Basard
Gorstak said:
not sure....that dude in blue suit does instill confidence...
Yeah, and what's with the beard......? He looks familiar.
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#16
TheGuruStud
Vayra86 said:
I know, its a body of water that leaked from their water chillers, much like the lakes. Still, though. Neither makes any sense.
"If we name it cold and small (opposed to lake), then people won't notice it's actually huge and hot!" --retard intel marketing director
Posted on Reply
#17
mak1skav
I am happy that they still mention "gaming" and not only AI and machine learning.
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#18
Assimilator
FordGT90Concept said:
"A narrow stretch of water forming an inlet or connecting two wider areas of water such as two seas or a sea and a lake."
a.k.a. a "strait" and, as far as I can tell, there's no "strait" called "Arctic Sound." Intel is making stuff up.
Just like there isn't a body of water called Sky Lake or Kaby Lake or Cannon Lake... nor are there bridges named Sandy or Ivy. Codenames don't have to mean anything, Intel has seemingly gone for water-based ones since 2015.
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#19
Vayra86
Assimilator said:
Just like there isn't a body of water called Sky Lake or Kaby Lake or Cannon Lake... nor are there bridges named Sandy or Ivy. Codenames don't have to mean anything, Intel has seemingly gone for water-based ones since 2015.
I know, but why not go for something like Montevideo.
Posted on Reply
#20
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
Vayra86 said:
Right. So their GPU (video output) line is called 'Sound'.

Much sense is being made.
Actually Arctic Sound makes a lot of sense when you use the geographical definition:

“In geography, a sound is a large sea or ocean inlet, deeper than a bight and wider than a fjord; or a narrow sea or ocean channel between two bodies of land.”
Posted on Reply
#21
Vayra86
rtwjunkie said:
Actually Arctic Sound makes a lot of sense when you use the geographical definition:

“In geography, a sound is a large sea or ocean inlet, deeper than a bight and wider than a fjord; or a narrow sea or ocean channel between two bodies of land.”
You'll have to guide me a bit more... I'm not seeing the relation to video cards. :cry:
Posted on Reply
#22
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
Vayra86 said:
You'll have to guide me a bit more... I'm not seeing the relation to video cards. :cry:
It’s just a name. Nothing more.
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#23
jeremyshaw
R0H1T said:
That was a wrong move IMO, under the aegis of Raja IIRC.
No, it was a legally required move after Intel lost a lawsuit to Nvidia. They first licensed graphics IP from Nvidia, then later licensed from AMD.
Posted on Reply
#24
Slizzo
Ubersonic said:
Looking forward to this :)

Will be awesome once Intel's GPUs hit the scene, with AMD/Intel supporting Freesync it means Nvidia will have no choice but to finally support it (officially, I know there's workarounds). And as a bonus Nvidia will also have no choice but to stop disabling PhysX on their cards if the primary GPU is AMD (as doing it for AMD and not Intel would be lawsuit territory).

There's a bright propitiatory free future ahead :D
What are you talking about in reference to PhysX? You know it's both a software and a hardware solution, much like Havok? Only hardware PhysX is actually supported in some titles and Havok hardware physics doesn't appear to have been adopted anywhere.
Posted on Reply
#25
R0H1T
jeremyshaw said:
No, it was a legally required move after Intel lost a lawsuit to Nvidia. They first licensed graphics IP from Nvidia, then later licensed from AMD.
Alright but where did I say that it was a requisite move for AMD & I'm talking about AMD?
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