Sunday, January 27th 2019

ASRock Launches World's First Mini-STX Platform Based on AMD A300: DeskMini A300

The leading global motherboard and graphics card manufacturer, ASRock, pleasure to announce the world's first AMD based Mini STX Platform - DeskMini A300 at CES 2019. It adopts with AMD A300 chipset, not only supports AMD AM4 65W APU, but also provides up to 32GB DDR4-2933MHz high-speed memory, which leads to outstanding computing power and 3D performance. DeskMini A300 offers up to 4 storage interfaces, supports three display outputs simultaneously, M.2 Wi-Fi module and various accessories within 1.9 Liter compact size. DeskMini A300 is an ideal choice to build a home entertainment PC and mini data center.

DeskMini A300 features the brand new A300M-STX motherboard. Continuing the design of the ASRock DeskMini series, the AMD AM4 socket is able to support the Bristol Ridge and Raven Ridge's 65W APU, as well as two DDR4 SO-DIMM slots, which can support up to 32GB of capacity. With overclocking memory module, it will power up 20% of 3D gaming performance even more . Moreover, the DeskMini A300 supports three display outputs simultaneously, greatly improves the user experience.
Support Up to Four Storage Devices
The brand new DeskMini A300 equipped with two Ultra M.2 (2280) slots for PCIe Gen3 high-speed SSDs and two 2.5" SATA 6Gb/s interface for RAID function. RAID 0 provides excellent read/write performance; RAID 1 (Mirror) backup the data, enable the DeskMini A300 can be used as a personal mini-database. In addition, it also supports USB 3.1 Gen1 Type-C and M.2 Wi-Fi modules.

Various Optional Accessories
ASRock provides various optional accessories of DeskMini A300, includes 65W APU cooler, rear audio jack cable, VESA mount kit, and Wi-Fi ac kit. With comprehensive accessories, DeskMini A300 can satisfy diverse demands from all users.

For more information, visit the product page.
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21 Comments on ASRock Launches World's First Mini-STX Platform Based on AMD A300: DeskMini A300

#1
jeremyshaw
ASRock's site seperates the WiFi version from the non-WiFi version. I'm guessing the WiFi versions comes with antennas, but it also comes with the lowest end Intel WiFi chip, AC-3168. I wonder how much will it cost on store shelves.
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#2
silentbogo
jeremyshaw said:
ASRock's site seperates the WiFi version from the non-WiFi version. I'm guessing the WiFi versions comes with antennas, but it also comes with the lowest end Intel WiFi chip, AC-3168. I wonder how much will it cost on store shelves.
Should be the same as their current intel offerings: $150-160 for a barebone, maybe even cheaper. I'm eyeing one for myself too (especially if it's compatible with 3000-series APUs).
Regarding WiFi: better go with pure barebone option. Something like Intel 9560 9260 will cost you less than $30 new, and decent antennas from China cost around $5-7. I think I paid $6.99 for a complete set of 2x4dBi antennas and 2x U.fl to SMA pigtails. I'm not picky, so I simply threw in one of my spare Realtek 8821's (have a bunch of donor cards off dead laptops) for the sake of Bluetooth in my DeskMini 110.
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#3
ArbitraryAffection
Oooooh. I really want one of these for my mum. It'd be really cute and just slide behind the monitor and give her the most desk space.

This is really cool as A300 doesnt have a southbridge and just uses the I/O controllers on the SoC for connectivity. Though obviously it needs a seeprate controller for networking. if it can come without CPU i will just put her 200GE in it and save some money.
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#5
ShurikN
ArbitraryAffection said:
if it can come without CPU i will just put her 200GE in it and save some money.
It's barebones, you only get the case, PSU brick and the motherboard (and wifi card in the "W" model). You supply everything else.
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#6
ArbitraryAffection
ShurikN said:
It's barebones, you only get the case, PSU brick and the motherboard (and wifi card in the "W" model). You supply everything else.
Definitely going to buy one if its under £200
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#7
B-Real
ArbitraryAffection said:
Definitely going to buy one if its under £200
Should be. As I see, Intel variants are around $160.
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#8
ShurikN
ArbitraryAffection said:
Definitely going to buy one if its under £200
Judging by the japanese review, they paid just a bit under 20000 yen for the MoBo, case and brick + the default cooler. Thats around $180
So i'm guessing the system without cooler is probably $150. You could get your own cooler, but it needs to be short (product page has size requirements)
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#9
jmcslob
I really want one.
This would be perfect for my kids... They have 720p Roku TV's and these with a 2400g and 16gb 2933mhz and a $120 500gb NVMe would be perfect.
That puts these at about $480 all said and done.
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#10
ShurikN
jmcslob said:
I really want one.
This would be perfect for my kids... They have 720p Roku TV's and these with a 2400g and 16gb 2933mhz and a $120 500gb NVMe would be perfect.
That puts these at about $480 all said and done.
Since it's 720p maybe just go for the 2200G and save... how much was it, $50-ish or so. Invest that in faster ram perhaps.
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#11
ArbitraryAffection
ShurikN said:
Judging by the japanese review, they paid just a bit under 20000 yen for the MoBo, case and brick + the default cooler. Thats around $180
So i'm guessing the system without cooler is probably $150. You could get your own cooler, but it needs to be short (product page has size requirements)
I think the cooler that came with the 200GE will fit, it looks exactly the same. So £130-150 depending on extent of rip off Britain XD not too bad.
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#12
silentbogo
ArbitraryAffection said:
hink the cooler that came with the 200GE will fit, it looks exactly the same. So £130-150 depending on extent of rip off Britain XD not too bad.
The heatsink should be absolutely identical. TBH, I'm using an old sFM2 cooler for testing sAM4 boards in my workshop. Also have a Bristol Ridge APU with stock heatsink - same clamp size. Not sure about height, but the ones I have are tiny.
For Ryzen 3/5 I'd probably go with something beefier. I've used Deepcool HTPC-200 in my H110 barebone, but it was a tight fit (only few mm to the top grill, and I hat to bend the rear locking pad just a bit).
Some low-profile heatsinks from Xigmatek or Cryorig might fit. My Noctua NH-L9i was a bit problematic too, that's why it's sitting in my main PC.
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#13
yakk
I'm definitely interested, but like previously mentioned, Asrock usually cheapens out on the lowest Wifi adapter (even on their Taichi of all boards), if you'll need a serious Wifi connection you'll need to buy your own intel add in card.
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#14
lemonadesoda
Where is the second RJ45 network port to make this thing useful to people like us?
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#15
silentbogo
lemonadesoda said:
Where is the second RJ45 network port to make this thing useful to people like us?
I doubt it's meant for that kind of audience. Though, I wouldn't mind having a dual-LAN version myself.

yakk said:
I'm definitely interested, but like previously mentioned, Asrock usually cheapens out on the lowest Wifi adapter (even on their Taichi of all boards), if you'll need a serious Wifi connection you'll need to buy your own intel add in card.
3168 isn't that bad. Low speed comparing to alternatives? - Yes. But do you need more than 433Mbit/s of bandwidth even to stream 4K videos off Netflix or Youtube? - No.
I have 3168 in my laptop(s), and an 8260 in my desktop, and so far no complaints. Always stable, not a single dead WiFi adapter ever. Even on older laptops I'm trying to use stuff like Centrino 6200 etc. cause they always outlast competition and are always stable. Maybe not the fastest, but what matters for me is that it won't die next month if I decide to stream all seasons of XFiles non-stop, or upload 1TB of data to our work server.
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#16
yakk
silentbogo said:
3168 isn't that bad. Low speed comparing to alternatives? - Yes. But do you need more than 433Mbit/s of bandwidth even to stream 4K videos off Netflix or Youtube? - No.
I have 3168 in my laptop(s), and an 8260 in my desktop, and so far no complaints. Always stable, not a single dead WiFi adapter ever. Even on older laptops I'm trying to use stuff like Centrino 6200 etc. cause they always outlast competition and are always stable. Maybe not the fastest, but what matters for me is that it won't die next month if I decide to stream all seasons of XFiles non-stop, or upload 1TB of data to our work server.
The 3168 standard works great, agree. For cheap you can just pop in a 9260 or 9560 which is noticeable if you are working with it. Otherwise just for streaming or gaming yeah it's fine.
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#17
ShurikN
ArbitraryAffection said:
I think the cooler that came with the 200GE will fit, it looks exactly the same. So £130-150 depending on extent of rip off Britain XD not too bad.
These are the dimensions on the cooler ASRock sells for this thing:
77 x 68 x 39 mm
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#18
Mescalamba
Hm, kinda curious if it can actually power up those CPUs. Some of their desks dont work great with APUs in AM4.

Also curious how they want to cool VRM.
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#19
BoiseTech
Mescalamba said:
Hm, kinda curious if it can actually power up those CPUs. Some of their desks dont work great with APUs in AM4.

Also curious how they want to cool VRM.
The Japanese review showed a small heatsink over the VRM.
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#20
silentbogo
BoiseTech said:
The Japanese review showed a small heatsink over the VRM.
There are actually two. VRM hasn't changed much comparing to Intel variants. There's a "sandwich" of 2 identical small heatsinks on top and the bottom.

Mescalamba said:
Also curious how they want to cool VRM.
It's officially compatible only with 35-65W APUs, and doubt it's gonna be overclockable at all. At that power VRMs don't need much in terms of cooling (if any at all).
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#21
Valantar
Mescalamba said:
Hm, kinda curious if it can actually power up those CPUs. Some of their desks dont work great with APUs in AM4.

Also curious how they want to cool VRM.
Considering the only way to get a GPU into this is with an m.2 to PCIe riser and an external PSU, I'm guessing they've made sure it works with APUs.

Also, VRMs for a 65W CPU don't need cooling at all, essentially. Unless it's 1-2 phases, that is. 3-4 with half decent components and it'd be fine running with no cooling whatsoever.
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