Monday, March 25th 2019

ASUS Outs ROG Swift PG278QE: 27-inch WQHD with 165Hz

ASUS today rolled out the ROG Swift PG278QE, a 27-inch planar gaming monitor with stellar gaming-grade specifications. To begin with, you get WQHD (2560 x 1440 pixels) resolution, with 165 Hz refresh-rate, 1 ms (GTG) response time, and support for NVIDIA G-Sync. It also packs TÜV Rheinland-certified blue light reduction technology that reduces eye fatigue from extended gameplay sessions. ASUS did not mention panel type, however, looking at its 170°/160° (H/V) viewing-angles, we guess it could be TN-film based. Inputs include DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 1.4. The company didn't reveal pricing.
Add your own comment

36 Comments on ASUS Outs ROG Swift PG278QE: 27-inch WQHD with 165Hz

#2
medi01
btarunr, post: 4018994, member: 43587"
G-Sync
[IMG]https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fe.lvme.me%2Fkrrlh7l.jpg&f=1[/IMG]
Posted on Reply
#3
cucker tarlson
always failing to mention that all gsync panels support ulmb
Posted on Reply
#4
Prima.Vera
btarunr, post: 4018994, member: 43587"
stellar gaming-grade specifications
And then it's a stellar TN-film type of LCD....
Stellar dust....
Posted on Reply
#5
racer243l
Available sometime within the next two or three years. Just like the PG35VQ. Maybe they even add a DAC to it in the meantime...:wtf:
Posted on Reply
#6
ShurikN
The company didn't reveal pricing
It's Asus, it's bound to be overpriced...
Posted on Reply
#7
PanicLake
cucker tarlson, post: 4019010, member: 173472"
always failing to mention that all gsync panels support ulmb
So? That is one of the last priorities in a monitor to me.
1) Panel technology: IPS(must), VA(maybe), TN(no no)
2) Resolution
3) Refresh rate
4) Variable Refresh Rate (No G-Sync)
5) Size
6) Power comsumption
x) Other stuff

Dream Monitor: https://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-38GL950G-B-gaming-monitor
Hope they make a FreeSync version, but it will be probably way too expensive.
Posted on Reply
#8
bonehead123
TÜV Rheinland-certified
Now this is a new one on me... is this supposed to actually mean something, anything, or just some silly marketing mumbo-jumbo ??????
Posted on Reply
#9
wolar
IPS isn't superior for gaming, it has plenty of problems tbh. For just gaming a good tier TN panel is superior(i guess depending on games, i am speaking for fast paced one)
Posted on Reply
#10
londiste
So, this is a PG278Q (released back in 2015) again, with the added E. What is the difference?
Posted on Reply
#11
Caring1
"looking at its 170°/160° (H/V) viewing-angles, we guess it could be TN-film based"
Most likely a wrong guess based on the previous model being IPS.
Posted on Reply
#12
londiste
Caring1, post: 4019067, member: 153156"
"looking at its 170°/160° (H/V) viewing-angles, we guess it could be TN-film based"
Most likely a wrong guess based on the previous model being IPS.
PG278Q is TN, PG279Q is IPS.
PG278QE with 170/160 viewing angles is definitely also TN.
Posted on Reply
#13
ZoneDymo
wolar, post: 4019038, member: 147350"
IPS isn't superior for gaming, it has plenty of problems tbh. For just gaming a good tier TN panel is superior(i guess depending on games, i am speaking for fast paced one)
I guess that depends on what you consider being "gaming".
If its purely performance, ya know, the people that run state of the art hardware but turn all graphics to as low as possible just to get as many frames per second as they can, then sure a TN panel would be fine.

For me however, I dont care much for that, I want it all to look good and with IPS's better colour space/reproduction etc, id rather have that.
Posted on Reply
#14
cucker tarlson
wolar, post: 4019038, member: 147350"
IPS isn't superior for gaming, it has plenty of problems tbh. For just gaming a good tier TN panel is superior(i guess depending on games, i am speaking for fast paced one)
True.had an ips but couldn't stand the blb even though there wasn't much.if you're paying so much for ips then any bleeding is unacceptable.plus ips have no black color.people may think what they see is black but it's far from what you get on a va.
You're correct,better to settle for a nice tn with good gamma control,i'm very satisfied with my acer predator.
GinoLatino, post: 4019024, member: 180136"
So? That is one of the last priorities in a monitor to me.
1) Panel technology: IPS(must), VA(maybe), TN(no no)
2) Resolution
3) Refresh rate
4) Variable Refresh Rate (No G-Sync)
5) Size
6) Power comsumption
x) Other stuff

Dream Monitor: https://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-38GL950G-B-gaming-monitor
Hope they make a FreeSync version, but it will be probably way too expensive.
It's got nothing to do with your preferences.It's a great feature and if you put power consumption ovet ulmb you got your priorities wrong.
Posted on Reply
#15
Caring1
londiste, post: 4019071, member: 169790"
PG278Q is TN, PG279Q is IPS.
PG278QE with 170/160 viewing angles is definitely also TN.
Interesting how the power consumption has more than doubled on this screen and is exactly the same as the previous IPS version.
I'm not convinced adding an earphone jack accounts for that.
Posted on Reply
#16
Vayra86
GinoLatino, post: 4019024, member: 180136"
So? That is one of the last priorities in a monitor to me.
1) Panel technology: IPS(must), VA(maybe), TN(no no)
2) Resolution
3) Refresh rate
4) Variable Refresh Rate (No G-Sync)
5) Size
6) Power comsumption
x) Other stuff

Dream Monitor: https://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-38GL950G-B-gaming-monitor
Hope they make a FreeSync version, but it will be probably way too expensive.
To each his own, but this is what you're looking at

Note how ULMB/strobe is four times as 'fast' as a 120hz native render.

Posted on Reply
#17
Enterprise24
londiste, post: 4019061, member: 169790"
So, this is a PG278Q (released back in 2015) again, with the added E. What is the difference?
PG278Q that was release in 2014 is the first version and still considered one of the best 1440p 144-165Hz G-Sync TN monitor. Probably only one model that is free from the famous color banding issue.
PG278QR was release in 2017 and was update to 165Hz. This model is inferior to the first version. It suffer from huge color banding and clouding issue. Also aggressive panel coating could be a deal breaker for many people (The first model only use medium coating).
I guess PG278QE may try to address the problem of PG278QR. The later 1440p 144-165Hz TN panel from AUO seem to be much better at banding than early model. For example the ASUS counterpart Dell S2716DG was also suffered from huge color banding issue on early revision. It was mostly fixed on A08 and later revision. Also Dell S2719DGF which continue to use TN from AUO is completely free from color banding issue.

PS. TN panel is not always bad. Once properly calibrated (2.2 Gamma / 6500K White Point / 120 cd/m^2) the colors can looks good especially on newer 8 bit TN. The remaining issue is still gamma shift but that is just a natural trait of TN. Also any blur reduction technology work best on TN. There is none to less strobe crosstalk compared to moderate crosstalk on IPS and severe crosstalk on VA.

When you buy a monitors you have to pick poison bottles anyways. I can't stand against black crush and slow response time on VA that cause ghosting / inverse ghosing / strobe crosstalk. While I can live with gamma shift on TN and moderate level of black light bleed / IPS glow. So it is only TN or IPS for me. In the end I choose TN because price different is big at that time. 1440p 144-165Hz G-Sync TN cost $500 here while I need to spend another $400 for the same specs but being IPS models.
Posted on Reply
#18
Vayra86
Enterprise24, post: 4019096, member: 137706"
PG278Q that was release in 2014 is the first version and still considered one of the best 1440p 144-165Hz G-Sync TN monitor. Probably only one model that is free from the famous color banding issue.
PG278QR was release in 2017 and was update to 165Hz. This model is inferior to the first version. It suffer from huge color banding and clouding issue. Also aggressive panel coating could be a deal breaker for many people (The first model only use medium coating).
I guess PG278QE may try to address the problem of PG278QR. The later 1440p 144-165Hz TN panel from AUO seem to be much better at banding than early model. For example the ASUS counterpart Dell S2716DG was also suffered from huge color banding issue on early revision. It was mostly fixed on A08 and later revision. Also Dell S2719DGF which continue to use TN from AUO is completely free from color banding issue.

PS. TN panel is not always bad. Once properly calibrated (2.2 Gamma / 6500K White Point / 120 cd/m^2) the colors can looks good especially on newer 8 bit TN. The remaining issue is still gamma shift but that is just a natural trait of TN. Also any blur reduction technology work best on TN. There is none to less strobe crosstalk compared to moderate crosstalk on IPS and severe crosstalk on VA.

When you buy a monitors you have to pick poison bottles anyways. I can't stand against black crush and slow response time on VA that cause ghosting / inverse ghosing / strobe crosstalk. While I can live with gamma shift on TN and moderate level of black light bleed / IPS glow. So it is only TN or IPS for me. In the end I choose TN because price different is big at that time. 1440p 144-165Hz G-Sync TN cost $500 here while I need to spend another $400 for the same specs but being IPS models.
A few notes about crosstalk. I'm not seeing any of it on my VA here; two key elements: 120hz instead of 144 or higher, and (ambient) temperatures. A warmed up VA is noticeably better at it, it gets 'faster' and that also eliminates quite a bit of the smearing you see in darker hues.

But you're absolutely right otherwise, every panel tech is a trade off.
Posted on Reply
#19
PanicLake
cucker tarlson, post: 4019074, member: 173472"
True.had an ips but couldn't stand the blb even though there wasn't much.if you're paying so much for ips then any bleeding is unacceptable.plus ips have no black color.people may think what they see is black but it's far from what you get on a va.
You're correct,better to settle for a nice tn with good gamma control,i'm very satisfied with my acer predator.
Funny how some people assume that other will ONLY game on their monitor...
cucker tarlson, post: 4019074, member: 173472"
It's got nothing to do with your preferences.It's a great feature and if you put power consumption ovet ulmb you got your priorities wrong.
My priorities are straight on point on what I need. Who are you to say otherwise, you don't know what I do, where I live nor who pays my electrical bill.
Cheers!
Posted on Reply
#21
PanicLake
Vayra86, post: 4019080, member: 152404"
To each his own, but this is what you're looking at

Note how ULMB/strobe is four times as 'fast' as a 120hz native render.


Still...
Without reading an in dept review, ULMB can either look:
very good — with beautiful CRT-style motion clarity, no microstutters, and no noticeable double images.
or
very bad — with distracting side effects such as double images (strobe crosstak), poor colors, very dim, very microstuttery, flickery.

Source: https://www.blurbusters.com/faq/motion-blur-reduction/
Posted on Reply
#22
Vayra86
GinoLatino, post: 4019128, member: 180136"
Still...
Without reading a in dept review, ULMB can either look:
very good — with beautiful CRT-style motion clarity, no microstutters, and no noticeable double images.
or
very bad — with distracting side effects such as double images (strobe crosstak), poor colors, very dim, very microstuttery, flickery.

Source: https://www.blurbusters.com/faq/motion-blur-reduction/
Yes, but it is as so many things an option. And if you're in the market for a high refresh rate display with variable sync you're already in a situation where you would be switching display modes and options all the time, and prices are similar.

ULMB / strobe implementations do differ, as do all other monitor qualities. It just seems strange to omit a key feature for a high refresh rate display, because simply put, IPS without strobe can't even properly keep up with 144hz in G2G, all the high refresh gets you is more blur - or more ghosting from overdrive, which really looks about the same.
Posted on Reply
#23
Enterprise24
GinoLatino, post: 4019128, member: 180136"
Still...
Without reading an in dept review, ULMB can either look:
very good — with beautiful CRT-style motion clarity, no microstutters, and no noticeable double images.
or
very bad — with distracting side effects such as double images (strobe crosstak), poor colors, very dim, very microstuttery, flickery.

Source: https://www.blurbusters.com/faq/motion-blur-reduction/
On the bad side.
Strobe Crosstalk = Can't really do much on most monitor. Some that can adjust overdrive level may help reduce crosstalk. But most likely you will depend on panel type and manufacturer's mercy. The only blur reduction tech that allow user optimize to reduce crosstalk is BenQ DyAc. While ULMB is more like plug and play.
Poor colors = Not so much for modern blur reduction. This is not the day of Nvidia Lightboost. Gamma may skew a bit like from 2.2 to 2.3. Solution is calibrate monitor both normal mode and ULMB mode.
Very dim = On older models like PG278Q (2014) I would still say not likely. These old models still capable of hitting 120 cd/m^2. Should work find on most room unless you want to use monitor outdoor. On newer models like 1080p 240Hz TN G-Sync they can hit 250-275 cd/m^2. Overkill anyways.
Very microstuttery. Yes if you play unoptimized games that have poor / not smooth frametimes because in ULMB mode there is no "blur" to mask those stutter.
Flickery = depend. It is not as high as older monitor that don't use some kind of flicker free. This is personal preference. Some may OK with it while some may avoid it.
Posted on Reply
#24
Xuper
Vayra86, post: 4019080, member: 152404"
To each his own, but this is what you're looking at

Note how ULMB/strobe is four times as 'fast' as a 120hz native render.
wow CRT is still king ?
Posted on Reply
#25
Fx
GinoLatino, post: 4019024, member: 180136"
So? That is one of the last priorities in a monitor to me.
1) Panel technology: IPS(must), VA(maybe), TN(no no)
2) Resolution
3) Refresh rate
4) Variable Refresh Rate (No G-Sync)
5) Size
6) Power comsumption
x) Other stuff

Dream Monitor: https://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-38GL950G-B-gaming-monitor
Hope they make a FreeSync version, but it will be probably way too expensive.
Wow, that is really nice. My only concerns are are the cost and gaming compatability.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment