Monday, April 15th 2019

DeepCool Intros Castle 240 RGB V2 Cooler with Anti-leak Tech Inside

DeepCool today introduced the Gamer Storm Castle 240 RGB V2 all-in-one closed-loop liquid CPU cooler with an innovation that minimizes the risk of coolant leakages caused due to environmental air-pressure fluctuations. Called DeepCool Anti-leak Tech Inside, the innovation is an elastic pressure-relief bag inside the radiator's reservoir, which has an opening on one end to the air outside. When there is a pressure differential between the air outside and the coolant inside, the elastic bag either contracts or expands, adjusting the reservoir's volume to normalize pressure. DeepCool also extended the design-goal of leakage prevention to the coolant tube design, by using IIR (isobutyline-isopropylene rubber), a material used in slick aircraft tyres that has high elasticity to cope with touchdown. The inner tube is reinforced by fiber-weave sleeving.

This aside, the Castle 240 RGB V2 looks and performs like the original. Its design includes a somewhat tall, cylindrical pump-block with an RGB LED diffuser up top, plumbed to a 240 mm x 120 mm radiator with two included RGB LED fans. The pump's rated noise is 17.8 dBA at its fixed speed of 2,500 RPM. Each of the included fans spins between 500 to 1,800 RPM, pushing up to 69.34 CFM of air, with a noise output under 30 dBA. DeepCool includes retention modules for AMD sockets TR4 and AM4; and Intel sockets LGA2066 and LGA115x. The company didn't reveal pricing.
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14 Comments on DeepCool Intros Castle 240 RGB V2 Cooler with Anti-leak Tech Inside

#4
bogami
Deep Cool will provide a new but very necessary support for liquid cooling.
The problem of the expansion liquide and gasification greatly increases the pressure on the entire circle and consequently causes spillage. This is a big problem for small enclosed preformens circles, therefore a safety valve is present, which is also present regardless of the regulating body of D.C. own design. But it could be both in one piece, which I would expect today. It is very important to hev decompression space or safety valve when it comes to many large, composite liquid cooleng systems . Regardless of the short-circuit protection, the damage is great , it usually destroys part of the circuit because protection does not cover everything and also does not carry rings was my experience . Gl
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#5
EarthDog
bogami, post: 4030681, member: 102090"
This is a big problem for small enclosed preformens circles,
Is it though? If it was a big problem, one would think that over the past several years, all CLCs would have something similar....
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#6
aktpu
It would be kinda interesting to see if this performs any better on Threadrippers than run of the mills Asetek AIOs, but otherwise seems kinda meh
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#7
lexluthermiester
btarunr, post: 4030616, member: 43587"
minimizes the risk of coolant leakages caused due to environmental air-pressure fluctuations.
This seems a silly gimmick. Not buying into this without the science backing up the claims made.
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#8
EarthDog
Its a simple math equation, no? Like how much does water expand at a given temperature...

IIRC, water, from room temp to boiling is like 4%. What that translates into pressure, (4% more?) no idea...or glycol or w/e is inside. The point is, it doesn't seem like much.
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#9
lexluthermiester
EarthDog, post: 4030768, member: 79836"
The point is, it doesn't seem like much.
It isn't. That's why I'm calling it out as a gimmick. If we were talking about a liquid with a lower evaporation/boiling point, that would be different. But a water-based fluid? Forget about it. No PC will ever generate enough heat to make pressure a problem for the engineering tolerances in question.
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#10
bonehead123
Seeins how rads have been around for a long time, if pressure differentials inside them was REALLY an issue and causing leaks to develop, surely someone would have addressed it before now, yes ?

Instead of using a douche bag, why not use a REAL pressure relief valve like the one on your water heater, only smaller & more sensitive, or am I missing something here ???????

I'm with Lex on this, and also calling out the BS :D

And IIRC, DeepCool has had leak problems on their pump housings in the past, Yes ? Maybe they should fix that first....
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#11
bogami
Do not disparage this add-on. small preformens liquide cooleng systems are mostly manufactured to the lowest possible price, as we rarely see investment in more efficient copper radiators or at least congenerous materials, the flow of large amounts of liquid, and there are also rare good pumps here or good editives. Even the safety valve has not been on many AIOs for a long time and I only saw it on SilverStone units a few years ago.
Plastic tubes can take over this malevolent stretch problem, and most of them lay their system safety on them . The appendix is cheap and every percentage counts, but there is a lot of room for improvement. so that we do not forget the drop in the fan preformace area due to diode decoration .
Nobody installs the safety drain on the safety valve as it is turned down! and everything will be wet ..
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#12
bonehead123
bogami, post: 4031243, member: 102090"
Do not disparage this add-on. small preformens liquide cooleng systems are mostly manufactured to the lowest possible price, as we rarely see investment in more efficient copper radiators or at least congenerous materials, the flow of large amounts of liquid, and there are also rare good pumps here or good editives. Even the safety valve has not been on many AIOs for a long time and I only saw it on SilverStone units a few years ago.
Plastic tubes can take over this malevolent stretch problem, and most of them lay their system safety on them . The appendix is cheap and every percentage counts, but there is a lot of room for improvement. so that we do not forget the drop in the fan preformace area due to diode decoration .
Nobody installs the safety drain on the safety valve as it is turned down! and everything will be wet ..

??????
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#13
bogami
bonehead123, post: 4031271, member: 139670"
??????
You're forgetting about the ever-increasing leakage of AIO fluids recently . Plastic tubes with expandability take over the resulting changes at other manufacturers. Nowadays, more water is not used in AIO. The problem is long-term and not immediate. the addition is also a little bit of a promotional nature . The addition also extends a radiator which is not a copper ! wot a pomp for the offered. At the end of the huts, I wanted to draw attention to the large pressures on the system when heating up, and that the matter is solid ! When your liquid will sip the graphics card and destroy it, it would be much higher price than ignorance .
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#14
EarthDog
bogami, post: 4031341, member: 102090"
You're forgetting about the ever-increasing leakage of AIO fluids recently . Plastic tubes with expandability take over the resulting changes at other manufacturers. Nowadays, more water is not used in AIO. The problem is long-term and not immediate. the addition is also a little bit of a promotional nature . The addition also extends a radiator which is not a copper ! wot a pomp for the offered. At the end of the huts, I wanted to draw attention to the large pressures on the system when heating up, and that the matter is solid ! When your liquid will sip the graphics card and destroy it, it would be much higher price than ignorance .
ever increasing?

Dude, this was never an issue in the first place. As was said earlier, water when increased from ~22C to 100C its volume increases by 4%. A difference of 79C for 4% increase. Let's assume 45C water (hot!)... a difference of 23C...if linear that is ~1.5% difference.

You've repeatedly said this was an issue....buuuut really it isnt.
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