Tuesday, April 16th 2019

No Man's Sky Updated to Support Vulkan Renderer API

I've written my fair share of articles on No Man's Sky, since the game's concept is one of the more interesting in recent years (for me; editor liberties, can we call it?). The game may have excelled more in concept than in execution, but a series of updates have brought the game close to what was promised. Now, developer Hello games has brought about an update that brings a more subtle change: the game's API has been updated from OpenGL to Vulkan. The "behind the curtains" update has brought about improved performance across the spectrum of graphics cards that support that API renderer (in particular AMD users, as the patch notes themselves spell out), and, expectedly, an easier coding time for the developers. Improved HDR support was also coded into the game. The full patch notes follow, as well as Hello Games' words on this change.
"As part of our optimisation work, we have added Vulkan support to the game. We have been able to do this not only for Beyond, but for the current live version of the game. As such, we wanted to release this to you as soon as possible.

Final Vulkan support will bring many PC players an immediate performance improvement, but it also helps us increase our options as we continue to make significant engine changes. It is only one portion of a large body of work that will see technical improvements for all players on all platforms."
No Man's Sky PC Vulkan Patch Release Notes
  • OpenGL has been replaced by Vulkan. Many players, particularly players with AMD graphics cards, should see a performance improvement
  • Revised HDR support, updated output curve in line with advances in HDR calibration
  • Adaptive and Triple-Buffered V-Sync are now selectable from Graphics Settings
  • Players with more than one GPU can now select which is used from Graphics Settings
  • Changing the following settings no longer require restarting:
  • Window Mode
  • Resolution
  • V-Sync
  • Shadow Detail
  • Reflection Quality
  • The 'LOADING SHADERS' load step has been removed, improving the loading experience.
  • Crash data is gathered via Steam to help us track down and fix issues.
Source: DSOGaming
Add your own comment

37 Comments on No Man's Sky Updated to Support Vulkan Renderer API

#1
windwhirl
I think you forgot to add the source.

The Vulkan API choice seems to be rolling out only on the experimental branch for now. Later on, probably once the Beyond update is polished enough, they will release it for all users.

Gotta give it a try right now, though :D
Posted on Reply
#2
Raevenlord
News Editor
windwhirl said:
I think you forgot to add the source.

The Vulkan API choice seems to be rolling out only on the experimental branch for now. Later on, probably once the Beyond update is polished enough, they will release it for all users.

Gotta give it a try right now, though :D
Thank you, did forget =) fixed.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheGuruStud
Can't make it past 1st world, anyway. How about they fix the game first lol
Posted on Reply
#4
Batou1986
Game runs much better now with almost no stuttering, went from 30~40 fps in stations to 60+
Also wanted to point out that its not a render option they literally dropped OGL in favor of Vulkan going forward.
Posted on Reply
#5
Crackong
Is the game finally getting out of its early access state ?
Posted on Reply
#6
windwhirl
Been playing for around 30 minutes.

Before, with all the settings at the lowest possible, resolution at 1280x720, AF 1x and FXAA enabled, it barely reached 20/25 FPS at best, and it could go as low as 3 FPS.

Now, I pushed the resolution to 1920x1080, AF 2x and everything else to either "On" or "Medium" (except Motion Blur, which remains Off) and the game goes anywhere between 25 to 90 FPS (my homebase is full of holes and there is a lot of stuff and glass all around, so I suppose it gets really jittery because of that).

There seems to be some problem loading ground textures in time. I think the problem may be tessellation. I'll have to try setting it to Off.

Keep in mind that I'm running this game on a Core i3 and a RX 580, so performance will hardly be impressive. But the upgrades in my game experience are pretty damn good.

Go Vulkan!!:rockout::D
Posted on Reply
#7
HisDivineOrder
Replacing OpenGL for Vulkan is bad for streamers if you can't do Game Capture via OBS. Last I checked, Vulkan wasn't usable by Game Capture. Probably should have left it a choice.
Posted on Reply
#8
DeathtoGnomes
HisDivineOrder said:
Replacing OpenGL for Vulkan is bad for streamers if you can't do Game Capture via OBS. Last I checked, Vulkan wasn't usable by Game Capture. Probably should have left it a choice.
no the only choice is whether to try to stream NMS or not. Maybe OBS should fix their client?
Posted on Reply
#9
dj-electric
TheGuruStud said:
Can't make it past 1st world, anyway. How about they fix the game first lol
How about you actually try? :) its easy and simple.
Crackong said:
Is the game finally getting out of its early access state ?
More than that. It is currently the highest replay-value space game you'll probably find.
Posted on Reply
#10
Crackong
dj-electric said:


More than that. It is currently the highest replay-value space game you'll probably find.
Okay, might have a look if it is on Easter sale. :lovetpu:
Posted on Reply
#11
Khonjel
dj-electric said:
More than that. It is currently the highest replay-value space game you'll probably find.
Mind describing me what's the gameplay like?

I tuned it off after all the controversies.

Like is it like Subnautica? Alone exploration with base building. Or more like a MMO like ARK: SE.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheLaughingMan
Khonjel said:
Mind describing me what's the gameplay like?

I tuned it off after all the controversies.

Like is it like Subnautica? Alone exploration with base building. Or more like a MMO like ARK: SE.
Subnautica in space. I am 84 hours in and I still occassionally find something I have never seen before.
Posted on Reply
#13
jaggerwild
OH there still fixing the dead dog how cute!
Posted on Reply
#14
dj-electric
jaggerwild said:
OH there still fixing the dead dog how cute!
I see someone hasn't picked up the game after it got pretty much remade again in 2018?
Posted on Reply
#15
Chrispy_
HisDivineOrder said:
Replacing OpenGL for Vulkan is bad for streamers if you can't do Game Capture via OBS. Last I checked, Vulkan wasn't usable by Game Capture. Probably should have left it a choice.
That's an issue that OBS needs to fix, Vulcan's far from a "new" API!

Neither Shadowplay nor ReLive have any issues with Vulcan, OBS just need to move on from their 6-year old code.
Posted on Reply
#16
Slizzo
Khonjel said:
Mind describing me what's the gameplay like?

I tuned it off after all the controversies.

Like is it like Subnautica? Alone exploration with base building. Or more like a MMO like ARK: SE.
TheLaughingMan said:
Subnautica in space. I am 84 hours in and I still occassionally find something I have never seen before.
Well, sort of. There is multiplayer, so maybe more like Ark?
Posted on Reply
#17
dj-electric
Slizzo said:
Well, sort of. There is multiplayer, so maybe more like Ark?
The next update should be heavily focused on multiplayer. It exists, but needs improvements.
Posted on Reply
#18
vega22
Batou1986 said:
Game runs much better now with almost no stuttering, went from 30~40 fps in stations to 60+
Also wanted to point out that its not a render option they literally dropped OGL in favor of Vulkan going forward.
Ogl died with 4, Vulcan is Ogl 5 in all but name.
Posted on Reply
#19
bug
...and, expectedly, an easier coding time for the developers
Where did that come from? I don't have first hand experience with Vulkan, but talking to a guy that does it takes about 10x the effort to set up a scene using these low level APIs, compared to their predecessors.
It's like going back from Java/C# to plain C. You get more flexibility, but you have to work for it.
Posted on Reply
#20
lexluthermiester
bug said:
but talking to a guy that does it takes about 10x the effort to set up a scene using these low level APIs
Having dabbled myself, this is a gross over-exaggeration.
bug said:
You get more flexibility, but you have to work for it.
Not exactly a bad thing.
Posted on Reply
#21
bug
lexluthermiester said:
Having dabbled myself, this is a gross over-exaggeration.
Good to know.
lexluthermiester said:
Not exactly a bad thing.
Not for an enthusiast maybe, but try selling to a manager a solution that takes twice as long for an extra 20-30% benefit ;)
Posted on Reply
#22
lexluthermiester
bug said:
Not for an enthusiast maybe, but try selling to a manager a solution that takes twice as long for an extra 20-30% benefit ;)
That's easy, benefit to the end user which will make the product on offer more appealing and desirable!
Posted on Reply
#23
bug
lexluthermiester said:
That's easy, benefit to the end user which will make the product on offer more appealing and desirable!
I admire your innocence. They'll just ask you: do I get twice the profit if I invest twice as much money? :D

I totally see your point, I often have to argue if you have to choose before developer's comfort and user's experience you should always pick the latter. But just because I have to argue that, means many people (fellow developers) think otherwise. Somewhat related, but no further than today I pointed out there's no need for Java (+a bunch of Spring projects) to build some simple REST services where Python will do just fine. And the gist of the answer was "our devs are more comfortable with the Java way".
Posted on Reply
#24
lexluthermiester
bug said:
I admire your innocence. They'll just ask you: do I get twice the profit if I invest twice as much money? :D
Ah, but there's another cost/benefit. Entity reputation. Outfits like EA have little market respect which is why, even with their new battle-royal game, they are hurting financially. The gaming market has figured them out and doesn't trust them. With NMS, they had a bad start but strived to make things right had have. The public is forgiving them and the game has gained success. The dev house has gain a lot of insight and experience and understands what it is to make the right effort at the right time and how important reputation is. Long term player loyalty support goes a long way to drive success. Which is why I'm still an Nintendo geek. They are not perfect but they make the investments that count and drive quality over quantity.
Posted on Reply
#25
vega22
lexluthermiester said:
Ah, but there's another cost/benefit. Entity reputation. Outfits like EA have little market respect which is why, even with their new battle-royal game, they are hurting financially. The gaming market has figured them out and doesn't trust them. With NMS, they had a bad start but strived to make things right had have. The public is forgiving them and the game has gained success. The dev house has gain a lot of insight and experience and understands what it is to make the right effort at the right time and how important reputation is. Long term player loyalty support goes a long way to drive success. Which is why I'm still an Nintendo geek. They are not perfect but they make the investments that count and drive quality over quantity.
Ninty have always pushed the game forward in some way. They always stayed true to their roots. Mainly it was done pushing the control interface. They innovated such a range of ways to interact with a game and rarely get the credit.

Switch is a step away from that really. Something more of a merger of their main platforms. It is very current and gives the mainstream gamers a new way to play everywhere.

They are one of the few companies I willing call myself a fan of.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment