Wednesday, May 22nd 2019

Microsoft Advocates for Tighter Governmental Regulation of the Tech Sector With "Strong Enforcement Provisions"

Microsoft's Corporate Vice President and Deputy General Counsel Julie Brill in a blog post this Monday shared her - and Microsoft's - thoughts on regulation and its relationship to the tech sector. Julie Brill commented on the GDPR implementation originating in Europe, and how that could and should serve as a de facto standard of regulation that forces companies to steer away from the self-accountability on which they have remained for so long - and on which, paraphrasing Apple's own Tim Cook, "There are now too many examples where the no rails have resulted in great damage to society."

Microsoft feels that if left to self-regulation, companies won't do as mucha s they could in the pursuit of privacy and their consumers' rights as they would with a strong enforcement regime being planned and implemented at the governmental level. Of course, I think most of us agree with this at a fundamental level. However, there should also exist some defensive measures around the design and implementation of such governmental measures, such as, for one, no interference from corporations in the regulatory process. These should only serve as consultants, to prevent any ideas of bending the regulations in their behalf, and a pervasive strategy that accounts for both small businesses and huge corporation should also be key. We should remember that while the likes of Microsoft Apple, for example, should have relative ease in updating their practices and implementing regulation-required systems, other, smaller players could either live or die in their capability to quickly adapt to the new requirements. Snuffing out competition to the big companies by enforcing heavy penalties might not be the best road. What do you think? More regulation or self-regulation?
Sources: Microsoft, via TechSpot
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10 Comments on Microsoft Advocates for Tighter Governmental Regulation of the Tech Sector With "Strong Enforcement Provisions"

#1
damric
These "trumped up" allegations on companies in Iran and China is only making stuff more expensive, and especially hurts the poor and middle class. I wonder how much these oil and tech barons bribed his administration to attack competition. Consumer prices are way up, but I'm certainly not earning more in my paycheck. If the 1% completely siphons all of the rest of the wealth from the other 99%, what do we do then?
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#2
GoldenX
Sound like communism with extra steps, and this is coming from Microsoft? Man, we have to find the White Rabbit, this place is weird.
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#4
olymind1
Maybe they should remove telemetry from their windows' first, then they could speak about users' privacy..
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#5
hat
Enthusiast
The irony of this is not lost on me.
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#7
R-T-B
GoldenX, post: 4052388, member: 160319"
Sound like communism with extra steps
Not really, but ok.
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#8
GoldenX
R-T-B, post: 4052844, member: 41983"
Not really, but ok.
We the popular Microsoft company, that never did spy on someone, force you to improve your privacy measures, so you never spy on someone. It's not textbook communism, it's practical communism.
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#9
R-T-B
GoldenX, post: 4052848, member: 160319"
We the popular Microsoft company, that never did spy on someone, force you to improve your privacy measures, so you never spy on someone. It's not textbook communism, it's practical communism.
I just don't see how a bill forcing privacy regulations has anything to do with communism. You may as well argue HIPPA is communism.
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#10
DeathtoGnomes
Thats pretty thick coming from m$, considering how much telemetry data they collect without a opt-out choice. m$'s stance, on its face, appears to no longer be as aggressive with sabotaging competitors as its done in the past, unlike Googles BS with youtube. If m$ wanted to, and they dont, do more about privacy and stop so much data from being sent out and collected under the guise of "to improve performance" category that usually still include your personal info.

Advocating for this when m$ could do more is like the kettle calling the pot black. hypocrites....

R-T-B, post: 4052855, member: 41983"
I just don't see how a bill forcing privacy regulations has anything to do with communism. You may as well argue HIPPA is communism.
whaaaat? its not? :rolleyes:
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