Wednesday, June 12th 2019

Logitech G Expands HERO 16K Sensor to New Line-Up of Gaming Mice

Logitech announced that three additional mice in its lineup will be upgraded with Logitech G's exclusive, high performance HERO (High Efficiency Rated Optical) 16K sensor. The new additions to the HERO line-up include the Logitech G903 LIGHTSPEED Wireless Gaming Mouse, Logitech G703 LIGHTSPEED Wireless Gaming Mouse, and Logitech G403 HERO Gaming Mouse, all of which are designed for unrivaled performance and incredible accuracy for gamers of all levels.

"Since its introduction, our exclusive HERO sensor has been a breakthrough in sensor technology, and people love it," said Ujesh Desai, vice president and general manager of Logitech Gaming. "Rolling this out across more of our gaming mice just made sense, and we're excited to offer more gamers the accuracy and battery life needed to perform at their best."
The flagship G903 is upgraded with the best-in-class HERO 16K sensor, which delivers precise gameplay and 10x the power efficiency of the previous generation. This results in an incredible 140 hours of battery. The G903 includes: Logitech G's LIGHTSPEED Wireless technology, compatibility with Logitech G's POWERPLAY Wireless Charging System, immersive 16.8M LIGHTSYNC RGB, ambidextrous design, and up to 11 programmable buttons for precise game play.

Designed to comfortably fit in your hand, the G703 LIGHTSPEED is also upgraded with the HERO 16K sensor for incredible tracking performance and accuracy. With the G703, Logitech focused on reducing overall weight to 95g, while improving battery life to up to 35 hours on a single charge. LIGHTSPEED Wireless technology provides precise gameplay at 16,000 max DPI and zero smoothing, plus enhanced wireless performance, and it is compatible with the Logitech G POWERPLAY Wireless Charging System.

Rounding out the updated line-up is the G403 HERO. With a lightweight, ergonomically designed shape, and new HERO sensor, the wired G403 HERO gives users the tracking accuracy and performance they need to win. It also features LIGHTSYNC RGB, a 10g removable weight and six programmable buttons that can be tuned to gamers' exact preferences.

To help gamers get the most from their gear, all three gaming mice can be customized using Logitech's G HUB advanced gaming software. Featuring a clean and modern interface, the software allows gamers to quickly personalize their gear per game, share and download profiles with others and more.

Pricing and Availability
The Logitech G903 LIGHTSPEED Wireless Gaming Mouse with HERO sensor, the Logitech G703 LIGHTSPEED Wireless Gaming Mouse with HERO sensor and the Logitech G403 HERO Gaming Mouse are expected to be available on LogitechG.com and at global retailers in June 2019 for suggested retail prices of $149.99, $99.99 and $69.99, respectively.
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18 Comments on Logitech G Expands HERO 16K Sensor to New Line-Up of Gaming Mice

#1
TheLostSwede
Bring back the G500/G5 shape, pretty please?

I don't need/want a 16K sensor, I simply want a comfortable mouse with a great scroll wheel...
Posted on Reply
#2
bogami
Performance will probably be wonderful, control buttons also, the pads can be for one year, and all are too small for a normal arm of 17 cm, up to 15 cm hand is the maximum for the user of these mice if we want a good hand hug. Of course all are also racks. claw grip It is the only approach . After a prolonged use of G502, I felt a hurting hand . In general, the electronics are excellent and the grip is poor . price, as it's all the time sting .
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#3
raptori
G403 wired doesn't need any new sensor it's already have the best one all it does need is 50M clicks ( without jacking up the price with +$20).
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#4
Chrispy_
I'm not a high-cpi user (800 is what I prefer) so I'm asking the high-cpi mouse lovers - what on earth do you want 16K cpi for?

At 3200cpi (as high as my mouse will go) a slight movement of my wrist results in several complete 360 turns!
Posted on Reply
#5
EarthDog
Chrispy_ said:

I'm not a high-cpi user (800 is what I prefer) so I'm asking the high-cpi mouse lovers - what on earth do you want 16K cpi for?

At 3200cpi (as high as my mouse will go) a slight movement of my wrist results in several complete 360 turns!
DPI... you mean?
Posted on Reply
#6
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
TheLostSwede said:

Bring back the G500/G5 shape, pretty please?

I don't need/want a 16K sensor, I simply want a comfortable mouse with a great scroll wheel...
They actually have a G5 version with the Hero 16k sensor floating around in parts of Europe & Asia somewhere. Its been out for roughly a year but for some reason Logitech isnt getting distribution sorted which means that most people had to import theirs in.


My mistake - it was actually a MX518 but it still uses the same G5 shape.
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLostSwede
FreedomEclipse said:

They actually have a G5 version with the Hero 16k sensor floating around in parts of Europe & Asia somewhere. Its been out for roughly a year but for some reason Logitech isnt getting distribution sorted which means that most people had to import theirs in.


My mistake - it was actually a MX518 but it still uses the same G5 shape.
But it has the crappy scroll wheel and not enough buttons...
Posted on Reply
#8
Manu_PT
Logitech is making a big mistake. Hero sensor is way inferior to pmw3366 that they used before. They using a cheaper sensor and selling for same price.

Never thought logitech would go this route.
Posted on Reply
#9
oxidized
EarthDog said:

DPI... you mean?
Actually CPI is a more accurate term to use, DPI is much more generic and doesn't really describe appropriately how sensors work, but it's not wrong.
Posted on Reply
#10
EarthDog
Maybe... but it isnt remotely common...

...links?
Posted on Reply
#11
Chrispy_
EarthDog said:

DPI... you mean?
Dots Per Inch usually refers to print resolution (number of pigment dots per linear inch of paper) and in an outdated way, used to apply to CRTs as "phosphor Dots Per Inch"

Unless you're talking about printed media now, DPI is a deprecated term. PPI = pixels per inch for screen technologies, CPI = counts per inch for (mouse) sensors and scanners.

I think you can probably get away with using PPI, DPI, CPI interchangeably and everyone would understand what you're talking about, but if you're going to query it I might as well give you the origins of them all ;)
Posted on Reply
#12
EarthDog
Chrispy_ said:

Dots Per Inch usually refers to print resolution (number of pigment dots per linear inch of paper) and in an outdated way, used to apply to CRTs as "phosphor Dots Per Inch"

Unless you're talking about printed media now, DPI is a deprecated term. PPI = pixels per inch for screen technologies, CPI = counts per inch for (mouse) sensors and scanners.

I think you can probably get away with using PPI, DPI, CPI interchangeably and everyone would understand what you're talking about, but if you're going to query it I might as well give you the origins of them all ;)
Thanks for the info on it. Now I know... however I won't be using that term. :)

I mean, even mouse makers list it in DPI...I wouldn't call it deprecated at all considering the frequency of use compared to the term you mentioned.

https://www.corsair.com/ww/en/Categories/Products/Gaming-Mice/FPS-Fast-Action-Mice/HARPOON-RGB-PRO-FPS-MOBA-Gaming-Mouse/p/CH-9301111-NA#tab-tech-specs
https://www.razer.com/gaming-mice/razer-basilisk
https://www.logitech.com/en-us/product/mx-vertical-ergonomic-mouse?crid=7

etc etc....

Is there a company that lists it as CPI? It isn't these three major ones...

PPI, to me, is exclusive for monitors since it means Pixels Per Inch. I wouldn't use that for a mouse.
Posted on Reply
#13
theonek
they need to reborn the old legends as G7/G5 mouses and G19 keyboards, simply they were incredible...
Posted on Reply
#14
Chrispy_
CPI is counts per inch. It's USUALLY the same as DPI, but not necessarily.

When mice manufacturers talk about DPI they are talking about the number of screen pixels a mouse curson can traverse per inch of mouse movement. That's the product of the mouse sensor CPI, the mouse driver's scale or interpolation settings, and the OS mouse speed slider. I think manufacturers use it because it's an easy to understand value, but obviously in an FPS game there's no cursor and the game engine takes the raw CPI values from the mouse without ever translating them into a cursor pixel, as such. That's why you can still turn your character in a windowed game even if the mouse cursor has stopped because it's bumped up against the edge of the screen and run out of room to move.

Good gaming mice use 1:1 sensors, no interpolation, and linear output - which means 1CPI = 1DPI. If there is interpolation, driver shenanigans, or the mouse isn't a 1:1 linear sensor, DPI and CPI are different.

*Technically*, when talking about the sensor, CPI is the only relevant term since all it is providing is a coordinate count at its fixed sample rate. That's why testing software which bypasses the OS and driver software always shows the results in CPI.
Posted on Reply
#15
EarthDog
Thanks again for the information. :)

Still, it isn't a common term and DPI isn't deprecated. I ask you to show me where any mouse company uses CPI. The three major ones I listed do not...


...that said, this is a bit off topic from the OP, so I digress. :)
Posted on Reply
#16
Litzner
No one needs a 16K sensor, it is useless. Any gamers at 1080p only want to play at 800-1200 (if they know anything), maybe up tp 1600-2400 on big 4K screens. If you are playing higher then those figures you are doing it wrong...
Posted on Reply
#17
wickedcricket
TheLostSwede said:

Bring back the G500/G5 shape, pretty please?

I don't need/want a 16K sensor, I simply want a comfortable mouse with a great scroll wheel...
or G9x - that was the most comfortable mouse in the history of this planet.
Posted on Reply
#18
TheLostSwede
Litzner said:

No one needs a 16K sensor, it is useless. Any gamers at 1080p only want to play at 800-1200 (if they know anything), maybe up tp 1600-2400 on big 4K screens. If you are playing higher then those figures you are doing it wrong...
I use a lot higher than that on my 4K screen, I wouldn't be able to use it properly at that low setting. That said, 16k would be unusable.
Posted on Reply
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