Wednesday, June 19th 2019

Intel Launches Performance Maximizer: Automated 9th Gen CPU Software Overclocking Tool

Intel has launched a software overclocking utility tool for their latest 9th Gen, unlocked CPUs that promises to take the guesswork and BIOS delving out of the overclocking equation. The Intel Performance Maximizer tries to do exactly what the name implies by automagically overclocking your unlocked (read, K-suffix CPU for unlocked multipliers) with no further user intervention needed. Intel describe this tool as the one that "(...) makes it easier than ever to dynamically custom-tune an unlocked Intel processor based upon its individual performance potential."

Intel says they will offer you a one-time, free CPU replacement in addition to your usual 3-year warranty on a company CPU, should anything wrong arise during this method of overclocking. Intel say's this is a way to maximize your CPU performance on a per-sample basis, so results may vary according to your CPU's thermal properties (as we know, some CPUs perform and overclock better than others due to slight variations in the manufacturing process). But if you don't want to get inside your BIOS for a dirty, hands-on approach, you can always use Intel's software, which has been released at a very conspicuous time indeed, considering AMD's Ryzen 3000 series release.
Sources: Intel Performance Maximizer Release Notes, Intel Performance Maximizer Landing
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28 Comments on Intel Launches Performance Maximizer: Automated 9th Gen CPU Software Overclocking Tool

#1
TheLostSwede
Did Intel forget that they also have the Core i3-9350K/KF SKUs?
I guess it's easy done when you have as many SKUs as they do...

Also @Raevenlord , you forgot to mention the $19.99 overclocking warranty they're selling now, sorry, Performance Tuning Protection Plan.
At least it's cheaper than the last time they did something like this. Who says Intel doesn't give you value for your money?
I guess the good news is that if you get the Xeon W-3175X, the Performance Tuning Protection Plan is included...
https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/purchase-a-plan
https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/faq

Oh and for some reason, the overclocking software is 1.3GB in size...
Posted on Reply
#2
koaschten
TheLostSwede, post: 4066998, member: 3382"
Did Intel forget that they also have the Core i3-9350K/KF SKUs?
I guess it's easy done when you have as many SKUs as they do...

Also @Raevenlord , you forgot to mention the $19.99 overclocking warranty they're selling now, sorry, Performance Tuning Protection Plan.
At least it's cheaper than the last time they did something like this. Who says Intel doesn't give you value for your money?
I guess the good news is that if you get the Xeon W-3175X, the Performance Tuning Protection Plan is included...
https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/purchase-a-plan
https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/faq

Oh and for some reason, the overclocking software is 1.3GB in size...
The reason is, it is practically it's own OS in a UEFI Boot Image. Which is why there is a lot of limitations for what systems it can run on.
- system must be in UEFI modus
- Win 10 1809 or 1903
- must be on GPT partitioned system disk
- only Z390 chipset

As per this german post -> https://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/Auto-Overclocking-mit-Intel-Performance-Maximizer-4448544.html it shrinks the system partition, creates a 16GB partitioon and installs the tool to it. Then it boots to that instead of windows and starts testing out the limits of the CPU. They tested with a i5-9600 and an undisclosed cooler and gained 500Mhz. When it's done it basically boots to the Tool, applies the overclock setting, then chainboots windows. That's how I understood it.

If you want to undo the overclock, you have to remove the tool, it won't clean up behind itself though, so you have to re-max the shrunk partition yourself.
Posted on Reply
#3
ratirt
TheLostSwede, post: 4066998, member: 3382"
Did Intel forget that they also have the Core i3-9350K/KF SKUs?
I guess it's easy done when you have as many SKUs as they do...

Also @Raevenlord , you forgot to mention the $19.99 overclocking warranty they're selling now, sorry, Performance Tuning Protection Plan.
At least it's cheaper than the last time they did something like this. Who says Intel doesn't give you value for your money?
I guess the good news is that if you get the Xeon W-3175X, the Performance Tuning Protection Plan is included...
https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/purchase-a-plan
https://click.intel.com/tuningplan/faq

Oh and for some reason, the overclocking software is 1.3GB in size...
I'm not sure what I should think of this. Wait I know. It is laughable :) Protection plan my ass :p I don't know how you guys perceive this but for me it is like the last resort to stay in the game. Doesn't intel have something better than this? It's like they know it is over and they are so afraid to lose the processor primacy they would do this lousy stuff for people to believe in what they offer?
Maybe I'm wrong but that's the first impression and believe it or not it has never failed me.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheLostSwede
@koaschten that's some really helpful info, that I guess shouldn't been in the news post...
I don't think a lot of people will like that.
Posted on Reply
#6
Antykain
Going to try this on my 9900k and see exactly how it does compared to my current 5.1GHz OC. Never really cared or bothered to use any software that does an automagic OC on my rigs.. but, who knows. Maybe this is the one?

lol
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLostSwede
Antykain, post: 4067036, member: 90537"
Going to try this on my 9900k and see exactly how it does compared to my current 5.1GHz OC. Never really cared or bothered to use any software that does an automagic OC on my rigs.. but, who knows. Maybe this is the one?

lol
I doubt you'll gain anything over what you've already done manually, but please report back with the results.
Posted on Reply
#8
HTC
Does it include a chiller for maximum performance?

Just wondering ...
Posted on Reply
#9
bug
I hope they don't make the mistake of disappointing me by releasing this for anything other than Windows. Because, you know, that's all there is out there :D

Edit: just saw the link in the article, of course it's Windows only.
Posted on Reply
#10
Manu_PT
HTC, post: 4067044, member: 51238"
Does it include a chiller for maximum performance?

Just wondering ...
Yet another guy believing that 9th gen gets that hot on non AVX workloads. Idk man, Im at 5ghz and never seen it go past 65° with a tower air cooler.
Posted on Reply
#11
Antykain
Manu_PT, post: 4067056, member: 168799"
Yet another guy believing that 9th gen gets that hot on non AVX workloads. Idk man, Im at 5ghz and never seen it go past 65° with a tower air cooler.
Yep.. I'm using a custom water-cooling setup with my 9900k at 5.1GHz and temps are nothing I even worry about. Never exceeds 55c during gaming from what I've seen. BOINC (WORLD Community Grid) does push temps occasionally to around the 70-75c range.
Posted on Reply
#12
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
koaschten, post: 4067005, member: 102897"
The reason is, it is practically it's own OS in a UEFI Boot Image. Which is why there is a lot of limitations for what systems it can run on.
- system must be in UEFI modus
- Win 10 1809 or 1903
- must be on GPT partitioned system disk
- only Z390 chipset

As per this german post -> https://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/Auto-Overclocking-mit-Intel-Performance-Maximizer-4448544.html it shrinks the system partition, creates a 16GB partitioon and installs the tool to it. Then it boots to that instead of windows and starts testing out the limits of the CPU. They tested with a i5-9600 and an undisclosed cooler and gained 500Mhz. When it's done it basically boots to the Tool, applies the overclock setting, then chainboots windows. That's how I understood it.

If you want to undo the overclock, you have to remove the tool, it won't clean up behind itself though, so you have to re-max the shrunk partition yourself.
That’s about as dirty as it gets. :shadedshu:

So pretty much Intel has forgotten that enthusiasts have been overclocking their k cpu’s With the built in means in BIOS? Sigh.

And haven’t they already been offering the protection plan for 8 years already? Since IVB days.
Posted on Reply
#13
HD64G
Much panic from Zen2 eh Intel? You will get much lower in price and profit margin soon, or else your sales will drop like a rock. Think and move fast. Time has come. 7-7-2019.
Posted on Reply
#14
GinoLatino
The software is 1.5 Gb... what are they smoking? That is a retarded amount of bytes for a tuning app...
Posted on Reply
#15
TheGuruStud
HD64G, post: 4067083, member: 95052"
Much panic from Zen2 eh Intel? You will get much lower in price and profit margin soon, or else your sales will drop like a rock. Think and move fast. Time has come. 7-7-2019.
I can smell it. And Intel reeks.
Posted on Reply
#16
msimax
i wish they would fix the broadwell-e issue that screws up every setting in the bios on every reboot with the 1903 update :mad:
Posted on Reply
#17
Hardware Geek
Here's hoping they stop locking the clock multiplier on all their processors... I'll be over here holding my breath.
Posted on Reply
#18
Darmok N Jalad
koaschten, post: 4067005, member: 102897"
The reason is, it is practically it's own OS in a UEFI Boot Image. Which is why there is a lot of limitations for what systems it can run on.
- system must be in UEFI modus
- Win 10 1809 or 1903
- must be on GPT partitioned system disk
- only Z390 chipset

As per this german post -> https://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/Auto-Overclocking-mit-Intel-Performance-Maximizer-4448544.html it shrinks the system partition, creates a 16GB partitioon and installs the tool to it. Then it boots to that instead of windows and starts testing out the limits of the CPU. They tested with a i5-9600 and an undisclosed cooler and gained 500Mhz. When it's done it basically boots to the Tool, applies the overclock setting, then chainboots windows. That's how I understood it.

If you want to undo the overclock, you have to remove the tool, it won't clean up behind itself though, so you have to re-max the shrunk partition yourself.
What a strange execution. It boots to its own OS, but it still can’t support other OSes, AND you have to give up 16GB of your hard drive? This seems like a very corporate implementation of “enthusiast.”
Posted on Reply
#20
GreiverBlade
rtwjunkie, post: 4067068, member: 56774"
So pretty much Intel has forgotten that enthusiasts have been overclocking their k cou’s With the built in means in BIOS? Sigh.
weeellll, since they borked OC (and i tried every workaround to make it work again but none to avail...) with a microcode update on windows update, i can't even get a 100hz step up without either:
1. infinite boot
2. BSOD for when it boot

oh well that soft might be the solut..... naaaahhhh a x470/570 and a RX 3X00 will do ... (furthermore since it need a gen 9 and a Z390 ... which is absolutely not tempting at all, as an upgrade for me)

oh, i forgot... with or without HT... :roll:(well... with all mitigation and induced performances drop .... no wonder Intel, now, need a "performance maximizer" software)

that first line of the conclusion is spot on :
"Intel's Performance Maximizer tool is great for non-technical users who want a simple and easy "free" performance upgrade for their K-series 9th-Gen Intel processors. Unfortunately, limited support for 9th-Gen processors takes some of the shine off of the too"

nothing to see her ... Enthusiast don't need it (when they can OC their CPU ... and have a 9th gen cpu )
Posted on Reply
#21
John Naylor
I'm confused.... exactly what is Intel supposedly reacting to ? ... CPU Market share has been flat (77 / 23 ~ 3.35:1.00) for 3 consecutive quarters.

MoBo manufacturers have been doing this for years .... I find the better ones such as those provided with Asus and MSI boards (especially Titanium) work very well to get one in the ballpark quickly ... then I can fine tune from there.

The tool is actually a 1.5 GB download, the extra partition space is most likely used to store system information and test results.

It's free .... no one makes you use it, ... I won't likely use it, novices might .... so what's to complain about ? Like going to McDonalds and complaining that you can have a baked potato instead of fries .... if ya want. As for having an opinion, I don't have one as of yet other than saying until we see it tested and in use, I can have no opinion. For those who buy k series processors and never OC them, the Intel guarantee may make them dip their toes in these waters which is hardly a bad thing.
Posted on Reply
#22
rtwjunkie
PC Gaming Enthusiast
John Naylor, post: 4068282, member: 156078"
so what's to complain about ?
Well, this assenine way of doing things that is completely uncalled for:
koaschten, post: 4067005, member: 102897"
it shrinks the system partition, creates a 16GB partitioon and installs the tool to it. Then it boots to that instead of windows and starts testing out the limits of the CPU. They tested with a i5-9600 and an undisclosed cooler and gained 500Mhz. When it's done it basically boots to the Tool, applies the overclock setting, then chainboots windows. That's how I understood it.

If you want to undo the overclock, you have to remove the tool, it won't clean up behind itself though, so you have to re-max the shrunk partition yourself.
Who in the hell would allow a program to do this to their system?
Posted on Reply
#23
ypsylon
With all security vulnerabilities and mitigation which slow down the performance no wonder you need every ounce of Hz to perform at desired level. Eh... Intel, Intel wake up, smell the coffee, etc, yada, yada.
Posted on Reply
#24
FameOfTheWolf
This is pretty awesome if it works as easily as they say. As someone with low amounts of experience overclocking, this would be awesome to have.
Posted on Reply
#25
Tom_
Every Mainboard-Manufacturer also provides a Tool for automated Overclocking.
Posted on Reply
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