Monday, July 1st 2019

AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Cinebench R15 Performance Spied

Market availability of the 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X may be far away, given its September 2019 launch, but engineering samples (ESes) of the chip seem to be already in circulation. "uzzi38" on Twitter posted this spy-shot of a 3950X ES making short work of Cinebench R15. CPU-Z recognizes the chip by its codename "Matisse," and puts out the correct CPU core and thread count, but doesn't give a name-string. It also recognizes the MSI MEG X570 GODLIKE motherboard this test is run on.

The purported Ryzen 9 3950X ES, overclocked to 5.42 GHz, scores a gargantuan 5,501 points in the multi-threaded benchmark. To put this number into perspective, at stock frequencies, a Ryzen Threadripper 2950X (same core-count, double the memory bus width), scores 3,645 points. The 3950X benefits from not just its massive overclock that's over 1 GHz higher than the stock TR-2950X, but also higher IPC, and a more consolidated memory interface. This feat goes to show that AMD's upcoming Ryzen chips love to overclock, and deliver a significantly higher single-thread performance over the previous generation.
Source: uzzi38 (Twitter)
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38 Comments on AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Cinebench R15 Performance Spied

#26
EarthDog
Hey hey! That one is likely on water!
Posted on Reply
#27
lexluthermiester
EarthDog, post: 4073227, member: 79836"
Hey hey! That one is likely on water!
How can you tell?
Posted on Reply
#28
Xx Tek Tip xX
lexluthermiester, post: 4073661, member: 134537"
How can you tell?
Only 1.552v vcore, for water that's no issue once you get into 1.6v+ territory it's highly likely to be LN2 / chiller
Posted on Reply
#29
lexluthermiester
Xx Tek Tip xX, post: 4073692, member: 178884"
Only 1.552v vcore, for water that's no issue once you get into 1.6v+ territory it's highly likely to be LN2 / chiller
Except that the OP showed it was 1.7+volts and we have no way of knowing if that is on air, water or LN2. With Ryzen3xxx being on a refined 7nm process it might be possible 1.5v could be on air and the 1.7v in the OP was on water. We won't know for sure until it's disclosed.

It's also been floating around that TSMC is using a new formulation of elements in the process that reduces resistance in the circuit pathways, which would have the direct effect of reducing the heat generated by component electrical resistance. This is a problem that Intel and Global Foundries have been unable to solve. It's not that either one can't go down to 7nm, it's that the chemistry formulations they're using can not withstand the heat naturally generated by the elements within the circuit components at the clock speeds needed to compete.
Posted on Reply
#30
EarthDog
Post 26 shows the 1.55V 4.4ghz and is likely on water. The 1.7xV (if its reading right) and 5.4ghz is on extreme cooling.

I know what a 3900x is capable of under ambient water....weve seen other leaks too using extreme cooling and similar voltage and clocks.
Posted on Reply
#31
lexluthermiester
EarthDog, post: 4073700, member: 79836"
Post 26 shows the 1.55V 4.4ghz and is likely on water. The 1.7xV (if its reading right) and 5.4ghz is on extreme cooling.

I know what a 3900x is capable of under ambient water. ;)
Ah, that's right you have your own review site. This'll be interesting to see the results of.

Your guess, what would you think that "extreme cooling" might be? LN2? Refrigerated liquid/water?
Posted on Reply
#32
Xx Tek Tip xX
lexluthermiester, post: 4073703, member: 134537"
Ah, that's right you have your own review site. This'll be interesting to see the results of.

Your guess, what would you think that "extreme cooling" might be? LN2? Refrigerated liquid/water?
The 1.7v will certainly be sub-zero or LN2, I was referring to the 1.552v being normal water has it's easy to handle under a good loop.
Posted on Reply
#33
EarthDog
I wouldnt call it easy... from what I know, that going to be close to topped out on high end water.

lexluthermiester, post: 4073703, member: 134537"
Ah, that's right you have your own review site. This'll be interesting to see the results of.

Your guess, what would you think that "extreme cooling" might be? LN2? Refrigerated liquid/water?
Info isnt from there... but we'll know soon. :)

LN2 is what the articles say.
Posted on Reply
#34
lexluthermiester
EarthDog, post: 4073717, member: 79836"
I wouldnt call it easy... from what I know, that going to be close to topped out on high end water.

Info isnt from there. :)

LN2 is what the articles say.
I must be missing it. Btarunr didn't mention the cooling in the OP. Are you talking about another article?

Either way, are you doing a review on your site?
Posted on Reply
#35
EarthDog
The cooling in the OP is LN2 I'd imagine.

1.5V or so is likely be 360mm+ water...but maxed out.
Posted on Reply
#36
lexluthermiester
EarthDog, post: 4073730, member: 79836"
The cooling in the OP is LN2 I'd imagine.

1.5V or so is likely be 360mm+ water...but maxed out.
Fair enough. 1.7v on Ryzen2xxx would have to be LN2, but with the new process it's difficult to know for sure given the potential physics. I personally would never go above 1.475v on any modern CPU unless LN2 was involved, and even then I would consider the CPU in question compromised and not suitable for normal use.
Posted on Reply
#37
EarthDog
You're incredibly paranoid. :)

In my early days, I used ln2 on my daily drivers before I built out test benches. They are plenty valid after ln2 sessions. Surely they can die and more likely to during an ln2 sesh, but

Edit: I need to correct my info... the 4.4ghz clock I know was 1.35v under water and about tapped out thermally. That may be chilled water at 1.55v? Not sure.
Posted on Reply
#38
lexluthermiester
EarthDog, post: 4073740, member: 79836"
You're incredibly paranoid. :)
Better safe than sorry. :peace:
EarthDog, post: 4073740, member: 79836"
Edit: I need to correct my info... the 4.4ghz clock I know was 1.35v under water and about tapped out thermally. That may be chilled water at 1.55v? Not sure.
It'll be interesting to find out once the info embargo lifts.
Posted on Reply
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