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Intel Core i7-12700K Scores 800 Points in CPU-Z Single Thread Test

We have recently seen yet another performance benchmark leak for Intel's upcoming 12th Generation Alder Lake processors this time for the Core i7-12700K. The 12-core hybrid processor features 8 high-performance cores and 4 high-efficiency cores along with 20 threads running at 125 W TDP. The i7-12700K scored 800 points in the single thread CPU-Z benchmark which is just below the 825 points the flagship i9-12900K scored in the same test. The processor also achieved a multi-thread score of 9423 points which would put it just behind the Ryzen 9 5900X at ~9500 points. Intel is expected to announce the first Alder Lake desktop processors on October 28th with shipments beginning November 4th.

Another Day, Another Intel Core i9-12900K Benchmark Leak

Remember that Core i9-12900K CPU-Z leak from last week? It had the multi-threaded score blurred out and now we know why. A new CPU-Z screenshot has shown up on Twitter and although the single threaded score is still beating the AMD Ryzen 5950X baseline single core score by a comfortable margin, it's behind when we're switching to the multi-threaded score.

It shouldn't really come as a surprise that eight big and eight small CPU cores doesn't beat AMD's 16 big cores, but this was apparently expected by some. This is not saying that Intel doesn't get close as you can see, but it's also worth keeping in mind that Intel runs on 24 threads vs. AMD's 32 threads. The Core i9-12900K is said to be running on stock clocks, but no other information was provided. Once again, take this for what it is while we wait for the actual launch date and proper benchmarks.

Intel Core i9-12900K Single-Thread Performance Allegedly 27% Faster Than Ryzen 9 5950X

The upcoming flagship Intel Core i9-12900K has recently appeared in a CPU-Z single-thread synthetic benchmark where the processor scored 825 points. This would place the i9-12900K 27% higher than AMD Ryzen 9 5950X with 648 points and 20% faster then the previous generation Core i9-11900K at 682 points. This leak comes after SiSoftware published an early performance overview which showed the i9-12900K only matching the performance of competitors. We have also seen the processor in Cinebench R23 where it bested the 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX HEDT processor. The 12th Generation Intel Core family is expected to be announced later this year alongside the Z690 chipset with the i9-12900K rumored to cost 604.99 USD.

Intel Core i9-12900K "Alder Lake" Beats Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX at Cinebench R23 nT

An alleged Intel Core i9-12900K "Alder Lake-S" sample is shown beating the 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX HEDT processor at AMD's favorite benchmark, Cinebench R23, in its multi-threaded (nT) test. At this point it's not known whether the i9-12900K is overclocked, but the CPU-Z instance in the screenshot reads 5.30 GHz, which could very well be the processor's stock Thermal Velocity Boost frequency. The sample scored upward of 30000 points, putting it above the Threadripper 2990WX reference score in Cinebench.

The 2990WX is based on the "Zen+" microarchitecture, and released in 2018, but is a 32-core/64-thread chip that should have ripped through this rendering workload. The i9-12900K, on the other hand, has eight "Golden Cove" performance cores that have HyperThreading, in addition to 8 "Gracemont" efficiency cores that lack HTT. This benchmark was run on Windows 10, which lacks awareness of the Intel Thread Director, a hardware component that optimizes utilization of the two kinds of CPU cores. Windows 11 is known to feature better awareness of hybrid core architectures. The i9-12900K sample is possibly installed on a Gigabyte Z690 AORUS Ultra motherboard, and has 32 GB of DDR5-5200 memory (two modules, logically four 40-bit channels).

First Tentative Alder Lake DDR5 Performance Figures Leak

The first indication of what to expect in terms of early DDR5 memory performance on Intel's Alder Lake platform has leaked, courtesy of a Chinese forum and Twitter. It's not the first time we've seen DDR5 performance figures, but this time the CPU is clocked at much higher speeds compared to the figures leaked by Longsys back in March.

Although the memory is still running at 6400 MHz, performance is up significantly with read speeds of over 90 GB/s. As we're most likely still looking at an ES sample and an early UEFI build, there should be room for improvement here. The leaked performance numbers appear to be from a Dell system of unknown model.

CPU-Z 1.97 Brings Support for Alder Lake CPUs, DDR5, and XMP 3.0

CPU-Z, the software of choice for monitoring the CPU and its attributes, has yesterday been updated to version 1.97, which brings much-needed and interesting features. For starters, the new version adds support to detect Intel Core i9-12900K, Core i7-12700K, and Core i5-12600K "Alder Lake" CPUs and the Intel Z6xx chipset platform. Those specific SKUs are the top of the line in their respective categories, and it is only logical that support for the new generation starts there.

Next up, the software now supports detection of the latest DDR5 DRAM technology, which can now also be detected along with the new XMP 3.0 profile format. Last but not least, the software is adding detection for AMD's Radeon RX 6600 XT GPU as well.

To download the latest update, head over to our downloads section. If you wanna get pinged automagically when a new version is released, select the yellow "Get Notified" button on that same page.

AMD X570S Motherboard Spotted Alongside Ryzen 7 5700G APU

AMD seems to be preparing a chipset refresh, and this time, it is coming straight from the top-end market. When the company launched its high-end X570 chipset, it brought the PCIe 4.0 support, which many praised due to its capability to handle much faster NVMe drives. However, it seems like the company is not satisfied with that and it needs to release an updated chipset version called X570S. According to a popular hardware leaker, TUM_APISAK, we have discovered that GIGABYTE is preparing X570S Aorus Pro AX motherboard that will use the refreshed chipset. GIGABYTE already listed several Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) listings, so the new chipset is sure to hit the market, just at an unknown time.

The S denotes the word silent, meaning that these updated chipsets are capable of working with passive cooling and possibly having a lower TDP compared to 11 and 15 Watts of the X570 chipsets for consumer and enterprise motherboards, respectively. The test was conducted using AMD's newly announced Ryzen 7 5700G processor. The 5000-series of APUs are so far limited to OEMs, so one would guess that GIGABYTE itself made the leak by using a public entry of CPU-Z validation.

CPU-Z Enables Preliminary Support for Intel Alder Lake CPUs

CPU-Z, the CPU monitoring tool used to gather information about the processor your system is running on, has been updated with version 1.96. This new update doesn't change the software much but rather brings support for new hardware. Starting from this revision, Intel's upcoming Alder Lake CPUs have received preliminary support in the tool. To go along with CPUs, the software is now also enabled to recognize Intel's Z6xx motherboards that pair with Alder Lake processors. Alongside that, the software now also brings support for next-generation DDR5 memory, which is supposed to feature speeds anywhere from 4800 to 8400 MT/s. When it comes to AMD, the tool received an update that enables it to read information about AMD's Ryzen 5700G, 5600G, and 5300G APUs, and Radeon RX 6900 XT, 6800 (& XT), 6700 XT GPUs.
Download CPU-Z Version 1.96 Here.

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G APU Pictured and Tested

We have received various leaks and benchmarks for AMD's upcoming Ryzen 5000G processors, these were all from engineering samples but we now have our first look at the retail 5700G. The AMD Ryzen 7 5700G features the model number 100-000000263 attributed to earlier rumors and has been tested in CPU-Z scoring 631 points in single-threaded performance along with 6782 points in multi-threaded, and in Cinebench R20 it scored 6040 points. The integrated Vega graphics lack any official drivers but GPU-Z reports a Vega 8 processor with 12 Streaming Multiprocessors and a base clock of 2 GHz. AMD is yet to officially announce any Ryzen 5000G processors so it is unclear how far away their launch is and whether or not they will be made available to the DIY market.

ASUS ROG G15 with Radeon RX 6800M and Ryzen 9 5900HX Spotted

It's close to impossible finding a Ryzen 9 mobile processor-powered gaming notebook with a high-end NVIDIA GPU. Having returned to the high-end discrete GPU market with the "Big Navi" Radeon RX 6000 series, AMD is looking to complement its Ryzen 5000M series "Zen 3" Cezanne mobile processors with high-end RDNA2 GPUs of its own. An upcoming model of the ASUS ROG G15 (2021) leaked to the web in a CPU-Z validation database (model: G513QY). This notebook packs a Ryzen 9 5900HX "Cezanne" 8-core/16-thread processor based on the "Zen 3" microarchitecture; but more interestingly, the discrete GPU is Radeon RX 6800M.

The desktop Radeon RX 6800 (non-XT) and RX 6700 XT have shown that AMD has achieved performance/Watt parity/leadership over NVIDIA with high-end GPUs. VideoCardz reports that the RX 6800M is likely based on a maxed-out 7 nm "Navi 22" silicon, with 2,560 stream processors, and 12 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 192-bit wide memory bus. The RX 6800M could play in the same performance league as the GA104-based GeForce RTX 3080 Mobile, given that the desktop RX 6700 XT is leveling up to the desktop RTX 3070. Given the 256-bit memory bus width of the larger "Navi 21" silicon, it's quite possible that AMD comes up with even higher mobile SKUs, so AMD-powered gaming notebooks finally match/beat Intel+NVIDIA combinations.

AMD Ryzen 5 5300G Engineering Sample Benchmarked

The Ryzen 5 5300G is a rumored upcoming Zen 3 APU from AMD which has recently been spotted in engineering sample form. The new processor was recently listed on eBay with designation 100-000000262-30_Y, and while the processor is now sold out it has already been benchmarked and detailed. The Ryzen 5 5300G is the successor to the OEM exclusive Ryzen 3 4300G and consumer Ryzen 3 2300G processors and should offer significant performance improvements with the introduction of Zen 3 cores. The 5300G includes four cores and eight threads with a potential 3.5 GHz base clock and no reported boost clocks however this is subject to change with the official release.

The processor was put to the test with CPU-Z single-threaded performance showing the CPU bringing a 10.4% improvement over the 4300G while in multi-threaded bringing a 7.9% uplift. In Cinebench R15 the 5300G beats the Ryzen 3 Pro 4350G by 16.7% and the Intel Core i3-10100 by 11.6%. We only got two gaming benchmarks for Battlefield 4 and Battlefield V with the processors onboard Vega graphics performing admirably in both providing 29 FPS in Battlefield V at 1080p high settings. When played with less demanding graphics settings or with older games we see some impressive numbers with up to 95 FPS on Battlefield 4 at 1080p low settings.

AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 5750G Engineering Sample Overclocked to 4.8 GHz & Benchmarked

We recently reported on the AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 5750G Zen 3 APU being discovered in China. The Ryzen 7 PRO 5750G engineering samples were distributed to system integrators and OEMs for validation with confidentiality clauses however it seems many have made their way elsewhere with several selling on eBay for 500 USD each. The Ryzen 7 5750G and Ryzen 7 PRO 5750G should be vertically identical in performance as the only differences are mainly software and support based.

The Ryzen 7 PRO 5750G was initially overclocked to 4.89 GHz at 1.5 V however this proved to be unstable so the chip was benchmarked at 4.8 GHz with 1.47 V which proved stable. The APU scored 660 points in the single-core CPU-Z benchmark and 6898 in the multi-core which places it firmly within range of the Ryzen 7 5800X at 663 and 6766 points respectively. Considering that this chip is only an engineering sample it is likely to offer similar performance at stock speeds when officially launched.

Intel Rocket Lake-S CPU Pushed to 6.9 GHz on LN2

An Intel Rocket Lake-S CPU with 8 cores and 16 threads has recently surfaced in an overclocking video, being pushed to 6.923 GHz operating frequency, as showcased via a CPU-Z screen-grabbed from the video. Neither author of the video or the overclocker that pulled this feat are currently known. However, it can be seen from the CPU-Z that the overclocked CPU at 6.9 GHz supports instruction sets not available to Intel's current lineup of desktop CPUs, but that will be supported by Rocket Lake-S: namely, SHA and AVX512F. Likewise, the cache sizes correspond to the expected changes for Intel's Rocket Lake-S.

The overclocked CPU was paired with overclocked DDR4 memory as well, which was brought up to 6,666 MHz, buoyed by a crispy 1.830 V. Motherboard information is scarce, but it's speculated that it's a Gigabyte-branded Z590 motherboard. Perhaps this video is part of an Intel-pushed marketing attempt to increase desirability of its Rocket Lake-S CPUs to overclockers and enthusiasts. Expect the official Rocket Lake-S unveiling to occur during CES, with market availability around March.

Intel Core i9-11900 and i9-11900K (ES) Alleged CPU-Z Bench Numbers Reveal a 12% IPC Gain

Benchmark numbers of an upcoming Intel Core i9-11900 (non-K) and i9-11900K processor engineering samples allegedly obtained on CPU-Z Bench reveal that the chip will deliver on the company's "double-digit IPC gain" promise for the "Rocket Lake" microarchitecture. The i9-11900 (non-K) sample posted a single-threaded performance score of 582 points, while the i9-11900K ES posted 597 points, which are roughly 12% higher than typical CPU-Z Bench single-thread numbers for the current-gen i9-10900 (non-K) and i9-10900K "Comet Lake-S" processors. The multi-threaded score of the i9-11900 (non-K) ES, at 5262 points, ends up just around 5-10% lower than that of the i9-10900, despite a deficit of two cores. Intel's 11th Gen Core "Rocket Lake-S" story is hence shaping up to be that of increased gaming performance from the IPC gain, while roughly the same multi-threaded performance as the 10th Gen "Comet Lake-S."

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 9 5950X CPU-Z Scores Surface

Scores for AMD's upcoming Zen 3 Ryzen 7 5800X (8 core, 16 thread) and Ryzen 9 5950X (16 core, 32 thread) have surfaced on the CPU-Z benchmark. The results, which should - as always - be taken with appropriate salt, point towards the Ryzen 7 5800X scoring 650 single-core and 6593 points in the multi-threaded benchmark. The Ryzen 9 5950X is rated as scoring 690.2 points in the same single-threaded benchmark and 13306.5 points in the multi-threaded one. CPU-Z scores for the Intel Core i9-10900K (10 cores, 20 threads) are set at 584 and 7389 points respectively. This is further fuel to the fire on AMD's current technology and performance leadership.

AMD Ryzen 9 5900X CPU-Z Bench Score Leaks, 27% Higher 1T Performance Over 3700X

With AMD expected to announce its 5th Generation Ryzen "Vermeer" desktop processors next week, the rumor-mill is grinding the finest spices. This time, an alleged CPU-Z Bench score of a 12-core/24-thread Ryzen 9 5900X processor surfaced. CPU-Z by CPUID has a lightweight internal benchmark that evaluates the single-threaded and multi-threaded performance of the processor, and provides reference scores from a selection of processors for comparison. The alleged 5900X sample is shown belting out a multi-threaded (nT) score of 9481.8 points, and single-threaded (1T) score of 652.8 points.

When compared to the internal reference score by CPUID for the Ryzen 7 3700X 8-core/16-thread processor, which is shown with 511 points 1T and 5433 points nT, the alleged 5900X ends up with a staggering 27% higher 1T score, and a 74% higher nT score. While the nT score is largely attributable to the 50% higher core-count, the 1T score is interesting. We predict that besides possibly higher clock-speeds for the 5900X, the "Zen 3" microarchitecture does offer a certain amount of IPC gain over "Zen 2" to account for the 27%. AMD's IPC parity with Intel is likely to tilt in its favor with "Zen 3," until Intel can whip something up with its "Cypress Cove" CPU cores on the 14 nm "Rocket Lake-S" processor.

Ryzen 7 3700X Trades Blows with Core i7-10700, 3600X with i5-10600K: Early ES Review

Hong Kong-based tech publication HKEPC posted a performance review of a few 10th generation Core "Comet Lake-S" desktop processor engineering samples they scored. These include the Core i7-10700 (8-core/16-thread), the i5-10600K (6-core/12-thread), the i5-10500, and the i5-10400. The four chips were paired with a Dell-sourced OEM motherboard based on Intel's B460 chipset, 16 GB of dual-channel DDR4-4133 memory, and an RX 5700 XT graphics card to make the test bench. This bench was compared to several Intel 9th generation Core and AMD 3rd generation Ryzen processors.

Among the purely CPU-oriented benchmarks, the i7-10700 was found to be trading blows with the Ryzen 7 3700X. It's important to note here, that the i7-10700 is a locked chip, possibly with 65 W rated TDP. Its 4.60 GHz boost frequency is lesser than that of the unlocked, 95 W i9-9900K, which ends up topping most of the performance charts where it's compared to the 3700X. Still the comparison between i7-10700 and 3700X can't be dismissed, since the new Intel chip could launch at roughly the same price as the 3700X (if you go by i7-9700 vs. i7-9700K launch price trends).

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3980X is a 48-core Monster for When 64 Cores Are Too Many, 32 Too Few

In the press-deck of its 3rd Generation Ryzen Threadripper 3970X/3960X launch, AMD teased its flagship HEDT part for the TRX40 platform, the Ryzen Threadripper 3990X, with a 2020 launch date. It should come as little surprise then, that the core-count gap between the 3970X and the 3990X has an SKU in the middle - the 3980X. This SKU reportedly surfaced in CPU-Z 1.91 code. The 3980X is a 48-core/96-thread monstrosity for when 64 cores are too many, and 32 too few.

Like the 3990X, the 3980X will likely be built with eight "Zen 2" CCDs (chiplets) for optimal IFOP bandwidth utilization and heat-spread. Each CCD will likely be configured with 6 cores (3 per CCX), adding up to 48 cores on the package. Much like the 3990X, clock-speeds of the 3980X remain under the wraps. AMD is expected to launch the two some time in 2020, featuring compatibility with existing AMD TRX40 chipset motherboards. The company could target a sub-$3,000 price-point to make the Xeon W-3175X obsolete both in performance and value.

G.SKILL Announces Trident Z Neo DDR4 Memory Series for AMD Ryzen 3000

G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world's leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory and gaming peripherals, is thrilled to announce the launch of Trident Z Neo DDR4 memory series for the latest AMD Ryzen 3000 series CPUs on AMD X570 platform. Featuring optimized specifications for the new AMD platform, a new sleek dual-tone heatspreader design, and fully customizable RGB lighting, the Trident Z Neo memory series is the ideal DDR4 DRAM for your next AMD gaming system or workstation.

Optimized Performance for AMD Ryzen 3000: Computer systems with AMD Ryzen processors are known for its performance scaling with memory speed, and Trident Z Neo is engineered to achieve optimal performance with the latest AMD Ryzen 3000 series processors on AMD X570 motherboards. Under the latest AMD Ryzen 3000 series platform, DDR4 memory frequency support has increased by leaps and bounds, allowing the X570 chipset platform to run an unprecedented memory speed record of DDR4-5774MHz- the fastest memory speed ever achieved on an AMD platform under extreme liquid nitrogen cooling - as seen in the following CPU-Z validation screenshot with the MSI MEG X570 GODLIKE motherboard.

AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Cinebench R15 Performance Spied

Market availability of the 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X may be far away, given its September 2019 launch, but engineering samples (ESes) of the chip seem to be already in circulation. "uzzi38" on Twitter posted this spy-shot of a 3950X ES making short work of Cinebench R15. CPU-Z recognizes the chip by its codename "Matisse," and puts out the correct CPU core and thread count, but doesn't give a name-string. It also recognizes the MSI MEG X570 GODLIKE motherboard this test is run on.

The purported Ryzen 9 3950X ES, overclocked to 5.42 GHz, scores a gargantuan 5,501 points in the multi-threaded benchmark. To put this number into perspective, at stock frequencies, a Ryzen Threadripper 2950X (same core-count, double the memory bus width), scores 3,645 points. The 3950X benefits from not just its massive overclock that's over 1 GHz higher than the stock TR-2950X, but also higher IPC, and a more consolidated memory interface. This feat goes to show that AMD's upcoming Ryzen chips love to overclock, and deliver a significantly higher single-thread performance over the previous generation.

Intel "Ice Lake" IPC Best-Case a Massive 40% Uplift Over "Skylake," 18% on Average

Intel late-May made its first major disclosure of the per-core CPU performance gains achieved with its "Ice Lake" processor that packs "Sunny Cove" CPU cores. Averaged across a spectrum of benchmarks, Intel claims a best-case scenario IPC (instructions per clock) uplift of a massive 40 percent over "Skylake," and a mean uplift of 18 percent. The worst-case scenario sees its performance negligibly below that of "Skylake." Intel's IPC figures are derived entirely across synthetic benchmarks, which include SPEC 2016, SPEC 2017, SYSMark 2014 SE, WebXprt, and CineBench R15. The comparison to "Skylake" is relevant because Intel has been using essentially the same CPU core in the succeeding three generations that include "Kaby Lake" and "Coffee Lake."

A Chinese tech-forum member with access to an "Ice Lake" 6-core/12-thread sample put the chip through the CPU-Z internal benchmark (test module version 17.01). At a clock-speed of 3.60 GHz, the "Ice Lake" chip allegedly achieved a single-core score of 635 points. To put this number into perspective, a Ryzen 7 3800X "Matisse" supposedly needs to run at 4.70 GHz to match this score, and a Core i7-7700K "Kaby Lake" needs to run at 5.20 GHz. Desktop "Ice Lake" processors are unlikely to launch in 2019. The first "Ice Lake" processors are 4-core/8-thread chips designed for ultraportable notebook platforms, which come out in Q4-2019, and desktop "Ice Lake" parts are expected only in 2020.

Intel Core i7-9700K All-core Overclocked to 5.30 GHz On Air

Intel's upcoming 8-core/8-thread Core i7-9700K is in the news yet again, this time with a noteworthy overclocking feat of 5.30 GHz with all cores enabled, under air cooling. An enthusiast with access to an i7-9700K chip and an unknown motherboard posted blurrycam pictures of their setup and a CPU-Z screenshot showing 8-core/8-thread config, and 12 MB L3 cache, confirming this is an i7-9700K. The multiplier of this chip is dialed up to 53.0x, which multiplying the untouched base-clock works out to ~5.30 GHz. The core voltage made it to the screenshot - 1.215V.

The most impressive part about this feat is the cooling. A mainstream-looking tower-type cooler is used. Crossing 5.20 GHz with all cores enabled takes current-generation i7-8700K at least AIO liquid coolers. This is probably a testament to the soldered IHS the i7-9700K is equipped with, which improves heat transfer between the die and the IHS. Then again, it could also be the effect of a lack of HyperThreading. At higher overclocked speeds, disabling HTT on current-generation Core i7 processors contributes to stability.

Core i7-8700K Overclocked to 7.34 GHz (3c/3t) on Z270 Chipset, Bags SuperPi Record

German professional overclocker Dancop got the Intel Core i7-8700K processor to work on an ASUS ROG Maximus IX Apex (Z270) motherboard, something that's not supposed to work. CPU-Z screenshots seem to confirm this unholy union between the 6-core "Coffee Lake" processor and a 200-series chipset motherboard, using a custom "0084" BIOS dated 11th June, 2018. Dancop then proceeded to overclock the chip to 7344 MHz using extreme cooling, and 2x 8 GB (dual-channel) DDR4-4000 memory. This bench-stable build was then used to bag a SuperPi 32M world-record.

There's a rather big catch, though. Half the cores on the i7-8700K were disabled, and so was HyperThreading (not that it's relevant to SuperPi). The 3-core/3-thread chip was still bench-stable at 7344 MHz, crunching SuperPi 32M in a world-record 7.609 seconds. The clock speed was achieved by dialing up the multiplier to 73.0x, with the base-clock probably untouched, at 100.61 MHz (with the +0.61 MHz probably being variance). Supporting this clock was a blistering core voltage of 1.984 V. A liquid-nitrogen evaporator was used to tame the CPU and motherboard VRM. Find the validation in the source link below.

First Benchmarks, CPU-Z Screenshots of AMD Ryzen Threadripper 32-core CPU Surface

First benchmarks and CPU-Z screenshots of AMD's upcoming Ryzen Threadripper 32-core monster have surfaced, courtesy of HKEPC. The on-time-for-launch (as AMD puts it) 12 nm "Pinnacle Ridge" processor has apparently been christened "Threadripper 2990X", which does make sense - should AMD be thinking of keeping the 2920X moniker for 12 cores and 1950X for 16-cores, then it follows a 20-core 2960X, a 24-core 2970X, a 28-core 2980X, and the aforementioned 32-core 2990X. whether AMD would want to offer such a tiered lineup of HEDT processors, however, is another matter entirely, and certainly open for discussion - too much of a good thing can actually happen, at least where ASP of the Threadripper portfolio is concerned.

On the CPU-Z screenshot, the 2990X is running at 3.4 GHz base with up to 4.0 GHz XFR, and carries a 250 W TDP - a believable and very impressive achievement, testament to the 12 nm process and the low leakage it apparently produces. The chip was then overclocked up to 4.2 GHz on all cores, which caused for some thermal throttling, since performance was lower than when the chip was clocked at just 4 GHz on all cores. Gains on this particular piece of silicon were reserved up to 4.12 GHz - the jump to 4.2 GHz must have required another bump in voltage that led to the aforementioned throttling. At 4.12 GHz, the chip scored 6,399 points in Cinebench - a remarkable achievement.

Reported Intel i7-8700K Coffee Lake 6-Core Lineup Leaked

After a CPU-Z screenshot leaked of Intel's upcoming Coffee Lake hexa-core CPUs, which look to bring the fight to AMD's Ryzen, this time there are leaks of three different Intel 6-core processors. The previous CPU-Z screenshot apparently pointed towards Intel's upcoming 8700K six-core processor, with a base clock of 3.5 GHz and a boost clock of 4.3 GHz. The BCLK of the CPU was set at 100 MHz with a TDP of 80W.

In the new leak, the i7-8700K seems to have received a speed bump and accompanying TDP increase. It now sits at a reported 3.7 GHz base clock, 4 GHz boost for four and six cores, 4.2 GHz for dual-core workloads, and 4.3 GHz for single-core workloads under a 95 W TDP. The second leaked six-core processor still sits at that 95 W TDP, but has much lower core clocks than the purported 8700K: a 3.2 GHz base clock with 3.4 GHz boost for four and six cores, and a 3.6 GHz boost for one or two-core workloads. Both of these appear to be unlocked, overclockable chips (IA Overclock capable.) The last CPU in this leaked info is a 65 W chip whose clocks seem a little out of the other's league. It has a lower base clock of 3.1 GHz, granted, but a four and six core turbo up to 3.9 GHz. Dual core boost stands at 4.1 GHz, while single-core workloads see Turbo taking the ship up to 4.2 GHz. The lower base clocks and increased Turbo speeds mean that this is likely an i7 T series chip. Naturally, you should take this information with a bucket of salt.
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