Thursday, July 4th 2019

Various Reference Radeon RX 5700 Series Graphics Cards Pictured

AMD reference-design Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 graphics cards will launch on the 7th of July, and the company's various add-in-board (AIB) partners are ready with their inventories. VideoCardz scored pictures from various such board partners. As for the cards themselves, all of these are based on the AMD reference-design. The RX 5700 reference-design is in mass-production, contrary to older reports. All these packages appear to indicate reference clock speeds. In select markets, all of these packages include the Xbox Game Pass for PC, which gives you a 3-month access to vast library of full game titles from Microsoft.

There still are no picture leaks on custom-design Radeon RX 5700-series graphics cards, which suggests that they will be launched a little later. At Computex we spotted several new graphics card cooling solutions from AMD partners, confirming that custom-design cards are a go. The reference Radeon RX 5700 XT has an MSRP of $449, while the RX 5700 is priced at $379. As for the limited-edition Radeon RX 5700 XT AMD 50th Anniversary Edition, it will be available online through AMD.com in select markets, priced at $499. You pay the extra $50 for an exclusive product design, higher clock speeds, and likely some AMD goodies, such as an AMD|50 t-shirt.
Source: VideoCardz
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18 Comments on Various Reference Radeon RX 5700 Series Graphics Cards Pictured

#2
LocutusH
But where are the reviews?
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#3
gdallsk
LocutusH, post: 4074527, member: 150559"
But where are the reviews?
July 7th
Posted on Reply
#4
bug
What does "various ... card pictured" mean? There's only two of them.
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#5
Pumper
Same cards, different packaging = "Various Reference Cards", lol.
Posted on Reply
#6
kings
Why do custom AMD cards always arrive late? Nvidia announced the RTX cards and in the same day there were loads of custom models presented.

With Polaris and Vega, the custom models took almost two months to arrive. I'm already watching the picture, the Navi cards that people will actually want to buy, probably only in the middle of August and September!
Posted on Reply
#7
bug
kings, post: 4074540, member: 180022"
Why do custom AMD cards always arrive late? Nvidia announced the RTX cards and in the same day there were loads of custom models presented.

With Polaris and Vega, the custom models took almost two months to arrive. I'm already watching the picture, the Navi cards that people will actually want to buy, probably only in the middle of August and September!
That's how AMD sets things up. But does it really matter?
Posted on Reply
#8
Dristun
In 6 months time cue people claim that 5700XT is killer value at 390$ and boast about results with undervolting while AMD throws another 3 games on top.
I start to think that it's just their business plan all along.
Posted on Reply
#9
kings
bug, post: 4074544, member: 157434"
That's how AMD sets things up. But does it really matter?
Only it would be nice to have more models to choose from!

When custom Navi cards arrive, Nvidia already have saturated the market. Nowadays, almost anyone wants these cards with blower cooler.
Posted on Reply
#10
Vya Domus
kings, post: 4074578, member: 180022"
Nvidia already have saturated the market.
And if the AIBs cards were launched simultaneously the market wouldn't have been saturated ? Reference designs hit the market first then aftermarket models, this has always been the norm not the exception.
Posted on Reply
#11
bug
kings, post: 4074578, member: 180022"
Only it would be nice to have more models to choose from!

When custom Navi cards arrive, Nvidia already have saturated the market. Nowadays, almost anyone wants these cards with blower cooler.
Just look at the Steam surveys and the sorry excuse of a market share AMD GPUs have. The timing of custom designs is the least of their worries.
Posted on Reply
#12
kings
Vya Domus, post: 4074599, member: 169281"
And if the AIBs cards were launched simultaneously the market wouldn't have been saturated ? Reference designs hit the market first then aftermarket models, this has always been the norm not the exception.
I'm not saying it's not the norm, just that in AMD cards it usually takes a long time, sometimes 2 months after launch!

As I said, nowadays few people want a card with a blower cooler and if in the meantime the competition releases new cards (RTX Super) with better cooling and identical performance, it is more likely that people buy these.
Posted on Reply
#13
bug
kings, post: 4074612, member: 180022"
I'm not saying it's not the norm, just that in AMD cards it usually takes a long time, sometimes 2 months after launch!

As I said, nowadays few people want a card with a blower cooler and if in the meantime the competition releases new cards (RTX Super) with better cooling and identical performance, it is more likely that people buy these.
I think Vega was a special case, it took some time till people figured out how to cool it.

But still, buying at launch has seldom been a good idea. You have to let the prices settle first. When you do that, it doesn't really matter whether custom designs were available on day 1. That said, what Nvidia is doing, working with 3rd parties so they have the needed knowledge in time for a product launch is brilliant.
Posted on Reply
#14
Vya Domus
kings, post: 4074612, member: 180022"
nowadays few people want a card with a blower cooler
Well no, the FE 1070/1080/1080ti that were bought in droves because there was nothing else available at launch disagree with that. Which means people tend to buy whatever is available, blower or not.

You are talking as if Nvidia was making non-blower reference designs for ages and always had AIBs available from day one, they usually don't. As far as AMD partners not having cards for months after they are released that only ever happened with Vega which funnily enough no one wanted according to many, but somehow that was still an issue.
Posted on Reply
#15
nguyen
Vya Domus, post: 4074638, member: 169281"
Well no, the FE 1070/1080/1080ti that were bought in droves because there was nothing else available at launch disagree with that. Which means people tend to buy whatever is available, blower or not.

You are talking as if Nvidia was making non-blower reference designs for ages and always had AIBs available from day one, they usually don't. As far as AMD partners not having cards for months after they are released that only ever happened with Vega which funnily enough no one wanted according to many, but somehow that was still an issue.
Nvidia blower cards still don't sound like jet engines lol, even the Asus ROG Strix Vega 64 (default bios) is louder than the 1080 Ti FE, stock Vega 56 & 64 and Radeon VII are way worse.
https://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/asus_radeon_rog_rx_vega_64_strix_8gb_review,11.html
The issue with VEGA was because the height difference between the core and the HBM modules, as I recalled VEGA AIB came out as late as 6 months.
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#16
Vayra86
I need to say one thing in this otherworldly boring topic - AMD did get a simple blower design right this time. It looks classy.
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#17
bug
Vayra86, post: 4075368, member: 152404"
I need to say one thing in this otherworldly boring topic - AMD did get a simple blower design right this time. It looks classy.
Really? If it wasn't for that bend, I couldn't pick it apart from any reference blower designs in the past decade.
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#18
Vayra86
bug, post: 4075400, member: 157434"
Really? If it wasn't for that bend, I couldn't pick it apart from any reference blower designs in the past decade.
There are subtle details I like. The chrome look on the logo and ring around the fan, for example. The thin lines they put on it. It doesn't look plasticky.
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