Thursday, July 25th 2019

Teamgroup Releases T-Force Cardea Liquid M.2 SSD and T-Force Captain RGB Controller

TEAMGROUP's numerous products with great features have successfully attracted attention from around the world. In addition, two products with exclusive patents are released today as well, they are T-FORCE CARDEA Liquid water cooling M.2 PCI-e SSD and T-FORCE CAPTAIN RGB Control Box. T-FORCE CARDEA Liquid M.2 PCI-e SSD is the world's first solid state drive that combines water cooling and M.2. This innovative new product uses self-circulation cooling to lower the temperatures effectively. T-FORCE CAPTAIN RGB Control Box has 4 5V ARGB output connectors and one 12 V RGB output connector. Moreover, it supports multiple devices so the style is switchable with any combination when building yourself a PC and a variety of lighting effects can enhance the atmosphere. The two new T-FORCE products released today have exclusive patents. They are both innovative and unique, and TEAMGROUP's strength in research and development is displayed through them.

T-FORCE CARDEA LIQUID is the world's first, water cooling M.2 PCIe solid state drive specially built for gaming and high-performance PC. The crystal -clear outer casing structure, and T-FORCE LOGO's metal trim and the sliding rail design (Taiwan Utility Model Patent No. M574264) are the perfect combination of craftsmanship and style. After TEAMGROUP laboratory's testing and burn-in tests, by using the concept of self-circulation cooling effect, this product is proven it can effectively lower the temperature down 10 degrees. T-FORCE CARDEA LIQUID has PCIe Gen3 x4 high speed interface. The read/write speed is up to 3400/3000 MB/s, and random read/write speed is up to 450K/400K IOPS. In addition to the effective cooling effect which can keep the system stable, its excellent performance is also reliable. This year, it not only won the COMPUTEX d&i award, but it was also praised by everyone during its first appearance at the COMPUTEX 2019.
T-FORCE CAPTAIN RGB Control Box is an exclusive gaming RGB environment controller developed by TEAMGROUP according to the needs of gamers and PC DIY enthusiasts worldwide. T-FORCE CAPTAIN RGB Control Box has exclusive utility model patent and great surface design texture. The lighting effect switch button and the T-FORCE LOGO are combined with each other. The thoughtful magnetic feature makes it able to be attached on the computer case. It is an extended peripheral product which specially created for gamers' using environments. In addition to supporting four 5 V ARGB output connectors and one 12 V RGB output connector, it can also detect the source of the lighting control automatically to extend the synchronization signal connected to the motherboard. When there is no external RGB signal from the motherboard, then the five built-in, colorful, independent lighting effects of T-FORCE CAPTAIN RGB Control Box can be used to control as well. It supports multiple different devices and allows gamers to both ARGB and RGB devices at the same time. This offers gamers a more coordinated RGB lighting control solution and creating more extensible lighting effects for gamer's custom PC.

For more information, visit the product pages of the Cardea Liquid and Captain RGB.
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11 Comments on Teamgroup Releases T-Force Cardea Liquid M.2 SSD and T-Force Captain RGB Controller

#1
Basard
It reminds me of those novelty key chains they sell in China. The ones that come with a baby turtle or goldfish inside.
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#2
Animalpak
Very enthusiastic idea of liquid cooled M.2, but motherboard manufacturer ( at least most of them) are putting their heatsink often linked to the chipset that makes any aftermarket M.2 cooler not necessary.
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#3
Wavetrex
That actually looks kind of cool.

Watercooling enthusiasts don't make their systems watercooled because of extra performance (which is marginal at best), or for noise reasons, since direct fans can be equally silent
... they do it because it looks so damn good (especially with UV reactive coolant, or in-tube lighting).

I would really love to make a custom loop for my PC, but unfortunately it's out of my budget (or patience to set it up).
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#4
bonehead123
Animalpak
Very enthusiastic idea of liquid cooled M.2, but motherboard manufacturer ( at least most of them) are putting their heatsink often linked to the chipset that makes any aftermarket M.2 cooler not necessary.
Tru dat, UNLESS, of course, you wanna use a board with 3x M.2 slots, and most of the grubby mobo makers are only giving you 2 sinks, then you still have to buy a sink for the 3rd slot.......

Having said that though, I do like the design of this one, but they didn't mention what the warranty is for the cooling system nor the drive itself, which would seem to an important factor in anyone's decision to buy or not buy this particular drive, yes ?
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#5
Xx Tek Tip xX
Wavetrex
Watercooling enthusiasts don't make their systems watercooled because of extra performance (which is marginal at best), or for noise reasons, since direct fans can be equally silent
Actually, you can get both from watercooling. "Extra performance" is only relevant to Ryzen because it's binned to it's limits anyways, and watercooled setups on high end CPUs will always run cooler than air.
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#6
AnarchoPrimitiv
I wonder if that argb box uses industry standard (for the LED industry, that is) 3 pin Jst connections or that stupid, unnecessary 4 minus 1 = 3 pin that Asus invented for no other reason but to be jerks
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#7
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
but the question is... Where does all the heat go when the liquid inside becomes heat saturated?

The heatpipe cooler that Galax had on their HOF SSDs would make a better idea



Unless its some special liquid inside that is more resilient to heat (something you dont want in a cooler) The liquid will become saturated quite quickly and there is no radiator to take the heat out of the loop. This liquid cooler is purely just for looks.
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#9
nickbaldwin86
The problem is, what happens when the water gets hot, what is cooling the water? is there maybe fins we are not seeing?
Wavetrex
That actually looks kind of cool.

Watercooling enthusiasts don't make their systems watercooled because of extra performance (which is marginal at best), or for noise reasons, since direct fans can be equally silent
... they do it because it looks so damn good (especially with UV reactive coolant, or in-tube lighting).

I would really love to make a custom loop for my PC, but unfortunately it's out of my budget (or patience to set it up).
ummmm what?

I have a 5Ghz CPU and a 1080 at over 2Ghz... honestly the clocks were the same before and after on the GPU but I couldn't get near 5 on the CPU with air or at least the cooler I had. the difference the card would run at 85c with maxed out fans, on water it never goes over 34c, 3 hours of benchmarks or gaming and still 34c.

so NO water cooling isn't just for looks, on air my case would be annoyingly loud to run that "EXTRA performance" i am getting out of my processors and they would be "extremely" hot (over 80c is to hot imo).

Also the fans that are in my case cooling the radiators, barely spin and don't make really any noise a child blowing makes more noise.

once you water cool a PC you never want to go back to air cooled. Do it and see, start saving to make that budget a reality
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#10
TheMadDutchDude
Water cooling is for performance as well as looks. Anyone telling you differently is ... uneducated on the wonders of WC. :D

Because of the rad space I have, my system has its fans at <500 RPM most of its life. The temps aren’t as good as they could be, but I prefer the silent aspect it brings.
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#11
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Just to update my original post. Heres TomsHardware product launch announcement which has a lot more information.....
Team Group's patented self-circulation cooling system consists of transferring the heat from the SSD to the aluminum alloy heatsink through silicone thermal conductive pads. The heatsink is actively cooled with liquid through a convection process. The drive has a translucent indicator on the left of its transparent body so you know when to adjust the balance between the coolant and air. The black sliding rail gives your access to a screw inlet so you can add more coolant or replace the default blue coolant with another color. Team Group notes that you should only use the brand's special coolant and avoid using tap water or distilled water as it will reduce the cooling system's efficiency.
Maybe its because team group are chinese so Chinese to English translation might not always come out great but a few points to mention...

A. This heatsink is not 'actively cooled' - in fact its passive - youre relying on the airflow in the case to remove the heat from the liquid in the cooler like a radiator.

B. They dont recommend your own cooling liquids because there is something 'special' about the brand's own coolant that comes pre-filled in the waterblock and they recommend that you use only their coolant.


I know im being extremely nitpicky but this just irks me. Again it doesnt really answer the question of what happens when the liquid inside becomes heat saturated. the plastic/plexiglass shell wont help ti transfer the heat from the liquid to the outside.. Or maybe it will and im just being extremely fussy and looking into it too much.


it looks cool. but i would just rather have one of them heatsinks from EK or a lesser brand that you can buy from ebay/amazon ontop of my SSD if i had to have one.


In any case. a lot of motherboards come with their own SSD heatsinks these days so you might not need to buy one.
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