Tuesday, September 3rd 2019

USB-IF Announces Publication of USB4 Specification

USB Implementers Forum (USB-IF), the support organization for the advancement and adoption of USB technology, today announced the publication of the USB4 specification, a major update to deliver the next-generation USB architecture that complements and builds upon the existing USB 3.2 and USB 2.0 architectures. The USB4 architecture is based on the Thunderbolt protocol specification recently contributed by Intel Corporation to the USB Promoter Group. It doubles the maximum aggregate bandwidth of USB and enables multiple simultaneous data and display protocols.

The development of the USB4 specification was first announced in March 2019 by the USB Promoter Group. It is now officially published by USB-IF and available for download here.
Key characteristics of the USB4 solution include:
  • Two-lane operation using existing USB Type-C cables and up to 40 Gbps operation over 40 Gbps certified cables
  • Multiple data and display protocols that efficiently share the maximum aggregate bandwidth
  • Backward compatibility with USB 3.2, USB 2.0 and Thunderbolt 3
As the USB Type-C connector has evolved into the role as the external display connector of many host products, the USB4 specification provides the host the ability to optimally scale allocations for display data flow. Even as the USB4 specification introduces a new underlying protocol, compatibility with existing USB 3.2, USB 2.0 and Thunderbolt 3 hosts and devices is supported; the resulting connection scales to the best mutual capability of the devices being connected.

The upcoming USB Developer Days 2019 will include detailed technical training covering the USB4 specification and the latest for USB Type-C, USB Power Delivery, and new USB-IF branding strategies.
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13 Comments on USB-IF Announces Publication of USB4 Specification

#1
TheLostSwede
I guess this is also the start of the death of all but type-C USB connectors then?
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#2
TheinsanegamerN
TheLostSwede, post: 4109610, member: 3382"
I guess this is also the start of the death of all but type-C USB connectors then?
I thought USB C already killed type A connections. At least, that's what the internet kept parroting, meanwhile most everything is still type A compatible. type C USB drives are unicorns, most printers/keyboards/mice/other preipherals are type A, ece.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheLostSwede
TheinsanegamerN, post: 4109617, member: 127292"
I thought USB C already killed type A connections. At least, that's what the internet kept parroting, meanwhile most everything is still type A compatible. type C USB drives are unicorns, most printers/keyboards/mice/other preipherals are type A, ece.
Well, my phone is type-C and I can buy plenty different type-C USB flash drives locally.
Printers are actually type-B, but yeah, most other things are type-A still and so are most of the ports on brand new motherboards.
Posted on Reply
#4
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
TheLostSwede, post: 4109610, member: 3382"
I guess this is also the start of the death of all but type-C USB connectors then?
Which I am not a fan of at all
Posted on Reply
#5
ShurikN
TheLostSwede, post: 4109610, member: 3382"
I guess this is also the start of the death of all but type-C USB connectors then?
And thank god for that.
Posted on Reply
#6
claster17
Does USB4 add anything new or is it just a different name for TB3?
Posted on Reply
#7
JAB Creations
I remember back at the end of the 90s or early 2000s when I spotted my first motherboard that had no ISA slots. I was thrilled at the thought of that kind of progress. Unfortunately because it's obvious no one did product testing ever type A really really got a foothold in to the market. I'll be thrilled when at least enthusiast motherboard have both nothing but USB 4.0 type C ports on both the front and rear IO. Another issue is that huge amount of stock of components that use type A that are sitting in stores and warehouses. I don't believe this will happen until well in the DDR5/AM5 era though.

Just be thankful that the server and gaming markets are separate: they're still using serial ports!
Posted on Reply
#8
E-curbi
Mankind moving forward. :clap:
Posted on Reply
#9
juiseman
I feel like I'm always about to break a type c. I still prefer A my self. But it always takes me 2 tries because for some odd reason
I always pick the wrong side.......so I guess it takes 3-4 try's; cuz you got to double check twice just to make sure....then try once more before you feel you
have safely connected the USB Type A connector in correctly....

Don't get me started on Firewire 400.......

Maybe the issue is me? hmmmm..........
Posted on Reply
#10
Assimilator
juiseman, post: 4110343, member: 182553"
I feel like I'm always about to break a type c. I still prefer A my self. But it always takes me 2 tries because for some odd reason
I always pick the wrong side.......so I guess it takes 3-4 try's; cuz you got to double check twice just to make sure....then try once more before you feel you
have safely connected the USB Type A connector in correctly....

Don't get me started on Firewire 400.......

Maybe the issue is me? hmmmm..........
EVERYONE has that issue. The type-A connector is simply poorly designed.
Posted on Reply
#11
Vlada011
Nice, USB4 will be implemented in same time with PCI-E 5.0 and DDR5.
Only USB 3.1 Gen 2 still is not widely used.
USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 are most popular.

I have USB 3.1 Gen 2 Connector on front panel of case. He is easy removable because WX version of case had only hole, and WXC have and connector removable with 2 screws from other side.
If Lian Li launch USB4 connector I will regulary replace him. Probably will work same for PC-O11 classic and PC-O11 Dynamic/Air.
USB 3.0 above I use for Logitech Unifying Receiver for G900.

Posted on Reply
#12
ShurikN
Assimilator, post: 4110456, member: 7058"
EVERYONE has that issue. The type-A connector is simply poorly designed.
In its defense, it's 23 years old. And when it came out it was a pretty big deal.
The issue is they haven't made any progress until type-c... 20 years later.

Also, this needs to never happen again:
Starting with the 20 Gbit/s USB 3.2 standard, USB-IF introduced a new naming scheme. The original USB 3.0 (which was renamed to USB 3.1 Gen 1) with its 5 Gbit/s was retroactively renamed to USB 3.2 Gen 1 and the 10 Gbit/s USB 3.1 Gen 2 was retroactively renamed to USB 3.2 Gen 2. The newest 20 Gbit/s was named USB 3.2 Gen 2 x 2. To help companies with branding of the different transfer modes, USB-IF recommended branding the 5, 10, and 20 Gbit/s transfer modes as SuperSpeed USB, SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbit/s, and SuperSpeed USB 20 Gbit/s, respectively.
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