Monday, September 23rd 2019

Cooler Master Launches MasterFan SF120M Computer Case Fans

Cooler Master, a global leader in designing innovative PC components, introduces the MasterFan SF120M, a new addition to the flagship MasterFan Series of computer case fans. The SF120M is designed purely with performance in mind.

The SF120M features a patented, anti-vibration motor featuring dual ball-bearings to reduce friction, increase performance, and minimize noise during operation. Additionally, the frame's exclusive sound damping design featuring rubber corner pads lessen vibrations, further minimizing noise.
Industrial Fan Structure
The SF120M utilizes Cooler Master's Industrial Fan Structure, which decreases blade-flex while ensuring a quiet operation and maximum airflow.

Customizable Cooling Solutions
Embedded into the SF120M's frame is a small switch that allows users to preset the maximum fan speed into PWM mode. The fan includes three profiles reaching top speeds ranging from 1200 to 2000 RPM, allowing customizable cooling solutions.

The MasterFan SF120M will be available at select Cooler Master retailers including Amazon and Newegg, respectively for $29.99 on September 23, 2019.
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21 Comments on Cooler Master Launches MasterFan SF120M Computer Case Fans

#1
sutyi
Hmm... looks like the GentleTyphoon and the Noctua A12x25 will get some competition.
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#2
dj-electric
sutyi
Hmm... looks like the GentleTyphoon and the Noctua A12x25 will get some competition.
The secret to a great fan is simple. You let others spend years of R&D and money, and you basically make your own without doing so.
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#3
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
sutyi
Hmm... looks like the GentleTyphoon and the Noctua A12x25 will get some competition.
dj-electric
The secret to a great fan is simple. You let others spend years of R&D and money, and you basically make your own without doing so.
They may have copied the fin design but they won't have the motor design - This fan will be LOUDER than the competition because of that. A good double ball bearing fan is quoted to last 50k hours MTBF and it dont care if you mount them horizontally or vertically - so theres a small advantage.
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#4
ZoneDymo
looks like a solid no nonsense fan, so i like it, now lets wait for some reviews.
Gamers Nexus, get on it!
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#5
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Just saw the price... $30 which translates to £25... No. Just no...

Corsair ML' fans are £20
Noctua NF-A12x25 are £26-30 - but they come with their fancy motor
EK Vardar fans are around £20 or a little under £20
Swiftech Helix fans = £12 ($15) - but you cant find them ANYWHERE in the UK/Europe.

They are trying to sell you dishwater.
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#6
bogami
I don't know what is so expensive about this fan. In stores you can buy 120mm models in an aluminum housing with two axle bearings and a very capable electric motor for € 13 which is $ 11 to give an industrial quality model, not some pretty copy made of plastic and a metal beauty sticker. Someone's wings are growing and he has no idea that he will collapse due to greed. They target young people and children who have a poor knowledge of real value. The very backward thinking of the early capitalist at the expense of theirs children and enslave them! I'm sick of vomiting !
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#7
cyberloner
ball bearing fan is welcome......but the price is too much.... wtf happen to all computing stuff....
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#8
Basard
Interesting how ball-bearings are being advertised to minimize noise.... As opposed to what? Rusty metal?
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#10
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Just as point of note...
The SF120M utilizes Cooler Master's Industrial Fan Structure, which decreases blade-flex
Well maybe Coolermaster should stop cutting corners and print/mold their fans using less paper thin plastic.

Ive never heard of blade flex on a pc fan. I didnt think it spun fast enough to the point where air had the constancy of a finger being poked into the blades while it was running.


Maybe im being too critical of CM
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#11
Chloe Price
Waiting for reviews, though they're pretty expensive.
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#12
Firedrops
looks like they copied Noiseblocker's eloop's outer rings, and how is the rubber thing worth a patent? that's been around for decades.
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#13
Chloe Price
Firedrops
looks like they copied Noiseblocker's eloop's outer rings, and how is the rubber thing worth a patent? that's been around for decades.
I understood that the motor design is patented, not the rubber dampening.
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#14
m2geek
cyberloner
ball bearing fan is welcome......but the price is too much.... wtf happen to all computing stuff....
Shitler's tradewar made everything expensive
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#16
LocutusH
Waiting for noise normalized reviews first.

See meltemi.. thick fan, with a lot of marketing bullshit, but the A12x25 still outperforms it, and not just by a little.

Cooler Master also never managed to outperform other high-end component manufacturers yet. Always just lagging behind, even when the marketing says otherwise.
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#17
Blueberries
FreedomEclipse
Just as point of note...



Well maybe Coolermaster should stop cutting corners and print/mold their fans using less paper thin plastic.

Ive never heard of blade flex on a pc fan. I didnt think it spun fast enough to the point where air had the constancy of a finger being poked into the blades while it was running.


Maybe im being too critical of CM
Blade flex exists on every fan, it's just not noticeable to the naked eye, but it affects the manufacturer's allowed tolerance in tip clearance when designing a fan.
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#18
bonehead123
Blow me..... :)

pfff.... $30 for 1 fan,... for a 2 or 3 pack, maybe, but otherwise...so... n. O. t. happening...
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#19
Chrispy_
Blueberries
Blade flex exists on every fan, it's just not noticeable to the naked eye, but it affects the manufacturer's allowed tolerance in tip clearance when designing a fan.
Yep, it's why Noctua used fibreglass composite for their A12.
I'll pay a premium for that, otherwise Corsair's maglev series are the most impressive things I've encountered after that.

IMO, ball bearings may be more durable, but they're clearly audible even at low speeds. I'd rather see FDB or maglev bearings on a consumer fan.
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#20
Franzen4Real
Blueberries
Blade flex exists on every fan, it's just not noticeable to the naked eye, but it affects the manufacturer's allowed tolerance in tip clearance when designing a fan.
Very true. I once read about some of the R&D that went into the Noctua A12's, and it was quite interesting how much work they had invested to combat said flexxing of the blades. They wanted a design that had such a minimal gap between the frame and blade tip that they had to completely develop their own material (Sterrox) to hold the gap within tolerance.

I think the ring around the blades ala E-Loops is a pretty clever design that eliminates that tolerance issue as well as pressure leakage at the gap. Noiseblocker has a patent on that 'ring' in Germany, so I'm sure that plays into why we don't see it more often. (only the Asus ROG RTX coolers and these Cooler Masters are the only time i have seen it outside of the E-Loops).

On topic of the article, without some pretty incredible reviews, there is no way I'd take this fan over my E-Loops at these prices.

edit---- just noticed I basically repeated Chrisy_'s same reply on the same quote...oops
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#21
UltraThicc
What happened to their "150,000 hr MTTF" Rifle bearing? Why use inferior ball-bearing with only 60,000 hr MTTF ?
I guess they know how bad their rifle bearing is.
The "Industrial Fan Structure" just a lazy way to seal the clearance between fan blade and frame and decreases blade-flex .
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