Wednesday, January 15th 2020

The new Microsoft Edge Browser is out of Preview and now Available for Download

A little over a year ago, we announced our intention to rebuild Microsoft Edge on the Chromium open source project with the goals of delivering better compatibility for everyone, less fragmentation for web developers, and a partnership with the Chromium community to improve the Chromium engine itself. At Ignite, we unveiled our new vision for the web and search, our colorful new icon, and how Microsoft Edge + Bing are the browser and search engine for business — and we are thrilled by the growing excitement we've heard from all of you who've tried it out and sent feedback!

From this incredible momentum, today I'm pleased to announce the new Microsoft Edge is now available to download on all supported versions of Windows and macOS in more than 90 languages. Microsoft Edge is also available on iOS and Android, providing a true cross-platform experience. The new Microsoft Edge provides world class performance with more privacy, more productivity and more value while you browse. Our new browser also comes with our Privacy Promise and we can't wait for you to try new features like tracking prevention, which is on by default, and provides three levels of control while you browse.
Another innovative new feature in Microsoft Edge allows you to customize your online experience. Choose a new tab page layout or design, and select the types of news you want.

Microsoft Edge user interface
The last several months have been nothing short of inspiring for all of us working to deliver great new capabilities for Microsoft Edge including AAD support, Internet Explorer mode, 4K streaming, Dolby audio, inking in PDF, Microsoft Search in Bing integration, support for Chrome-based extensions, and more.

If you're a business or education IT administrator looking to deploy widely in your organization or school, we have you covered as well - you can download offline packages and policies and learn more on the new commercial site.

Internet Explorer legacy mode animation
People have downloaded the preview channels of the new Microsoft Edge millions of times to their devices, and we've seen many organizations begin to pilot these channels for their users. Enterprises and schools who have mission critical legacy applications and websites - but also want modern web and security - have turned to our new Internet Explorer mode as a "best of both worlds" solution. And for Microsoft 365 customers, using Microsoft Search to find files, people, office floor plans and more on your organization's intranet is as easy as typing in the Microsoft Edge address bar. Our early customers are calling it "a win."

Moving to the new Microsoft Edge - what to expect
Now that we've reached this milestone, you might be wondering what to expect on your PC. To get the new Microsoft Edge you have two choices: you can either manually download it today, or if you are a general consumer user, you can wait for it to be automatically released to your device via Windows Update. When you do make the switch, your favorites, passwords, form fill information and basic settings will carry over to the new Microsoft Edge without you having to do anything. You can read more about our rollout plans here.

If you're an IT administrator, you will need to download an offline deployment package to pilot within your corporate environment—the new Microsoft Edge will not automatically deploy for commercial customers. Additionally, none of the Microsoft Edge preview channels will update to the new Microsoft Edge, as they can be used side-by-side for testing and validation.

We also know that deploying a new browser isn't just "flipping a switch," so we want to make the process as easy as possible. In addition to simplifying deployment with tools like Intune and Configuration Manager, we are committed to helping your organization transition to the new Microsoft Edge. At Ignite we announced FastTrack and App Assure support for Microsoft Edge. FastTrack will help you deploy Microsoft Edge to your organization at no extra charge if you are a customer with an eligible subscription to Microsoft 365, Azure, or Dynamics 365. And if your sites are compatible on Internet Explorer 8 and above, Google Chrome, or legacy Microsoft Edge, then they'll work on the new Microsoft Edge. If not, contact App Assure and we'll help you fix it.

What's next
Of course, the innovation, testing, and new features don't stop coming today, and this initial release is only just the beginning. If you want a sneak peek of what's coming, we encourage you to keep using our preview channels - Beta, Dev and Canary - which will remain available for download on the Microsoft Edge Insider site. Not only will you get an insider's look at our features pipeline for Microsoft Edge, but you'll continue to have the opportunity to help improve Microsoft Edge with your valuable feedback. Your input helps make both the new Microsoft Edge, and the web, better for everyone.

Thank you!
A huge thank you to our community of Microsoft Edge Insiders as well as the engineers within the Chromium community who have worked with us to develop the new Microsoft Edge. We remain committed to actively participating in and contributing to the Chromium open source project. To date we've made more than 1900 contributions across areas like accessibility, modern input including touch, speech, digital inking, and many more.

Keep telling us what's working well, what needs to change and what you'd like to see in the new Microsoft Edge.

Our heartfelt thanks - we couldn't have made it here without you!
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116 Comments on The new Microsoft Edge Browser is out of Preview and now Available for Download

#26
Khonjel
Prima.Vera
Opera FTY :)
Hear hear! Though I thought of trying to get rid of it after a chinese company bought them, I just can't be bothered to move thousands of bookmarks I've saved.
Posted on Reply
#27
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
lexluthermiester
I've never been a fan of Microsoft's browsers. It's a trust thing. But I decided to give this a try. Took all of 10 minutes to dislike it, and 2 hours more to hate it. No Thank You Microsoft!


That's what I was thinking.
IE before XP was good, once xp rolled around it became a hindrance. Even more with it being Chrome...
Posted on Reply
#28
lexluthermiester
eidairaman1
IE before XP was good, once xp rolled around it became a hindrance. Even more with it being Chrome...
I'll agree with that. Still didn't like it. Netscape was just better all around. My perspective though.
Posted on Reply
#29
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
lexluthermiester
I'll agree with that. Still didn't like it. Netscape was just better all around. My perspective though.
It was ok for me, If I knew about mozilla then I would of grabbed it, it was Firefox that got me off of IE after XP came out...
Posted on Reply
#30
Totally
eidairaman1
It was ok for me, If I knew about mozilla then I would of grabbed it, it was Firefox that got me off of IE after XP came out...
Mozilla was just Netscape that was open-sourced just before AOL bought it. Thank goodness they had the foresight to do that avoiding AOL taking it to the grave with them.
Posted on Reply
#31
lemonadesoda
The way MS has fkd so many things it got its fingers into (e.g. skype, and other acquisitions) i DO NOT want them part of the chromium consortium. They will bully the direction and priorities to serve MS interests, and either force or fork to serve their own needs. I,m ok with MS using chromium as the new engine behind Edge, but I certainly dont want them doing a reverse takeover. And you can bet that IS their strategy.
Posted on Reply
#32
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
lemonadesoda
The way MS has fkd so many things it got its fingers into (e.g. skype, and other acquisitions) i DO NOT want them part of the chromium consortium. They will bully the direction and priorities to serve MS interests, and either force or fork to serve their own needs. I,m ok with MS using chromium as the new engine behind Edge, but I certainly dont want them doing a reverse takeover. And you can bet that IS their strategy.
I Lost complete confidence in MS with 8.0, 10 aint any different for me...
Posted on Reply
#33
matthewmatics
lexluthermiester
I've never been a fan of Microsoft's browsers. It's a trust thing. But I decided to give this a try. Took all of 10 minutes to dislike it, and 2 hours more to hate it. No Thank You Microsoft!


That's what I was thinking.
I went with zero 3rd party software on my recent 10 install...for about 3 days....couldn't stand it.

Back to Firefox and Ccleaner and shutup10.
Posted on Reply
#34
lexluthermiester
matthewmatics
I went with zero 3rd party software on my recent 10 install...for about 3 days....couldn't stand it.
Wow are you brave! ;) :toast:
Posted on Reply
#35
matthewmatics
I was digging it for second...just load up and go nuts....easy!

But if you ever feel like your not sure if chrome or firefox are faster just run edge or 11 for a few days....you will know again.
Posted on Reply
#36
lemonadesoda
Yep, MS is like the opposite of the Midas touch... Sadim touch, every they touch turns to sh1t
Posted on Reply
#37
EarthDog
Tried it.. sticking with Chrome.
Posted on Reply
#38
lexluthermiester
matthewmatics
But if you ever feel like your not sure if chrome or firefox are faster just run edge or 11 for a few days....you will know again.
Thing is, with all the plugins that I run in FireFox, I know for a fact my install of it runs slower than every other browser out there, but it's still snappy. Of course I never open up a million tabs and leave them open either..
Posted on Reply
#39
Bill_Bright
thebeephaha
It's just a reskinned Chrome to let Microsoft steal your data.
LOL No its not on both parts. It does use the Chromium open source engine but it is hardly a reskinned Chrome. And if the naysayers would just take a few minutes to read up on it, they would see it does MUCH more than Chrome to protect our data and privacy. See this and note where it talks about blocking 100s of Google tracking code by default - and that's on the medium or "balanced" setting. Move it to "Strict" and it really gets aggressive.
Ravenas
Edge may be viable once it matures, but right now it is still essentially in beta.
:rolleyes: No its not. It was in beta for several months before now and was available for everyone to try. I did, but stuck with Pale Moon as my preferred browser. That's the whole point of Microsoft abandoning the "old" Edge for this "new" Edge. It uses the "mature" Chromium engine that complies with industry (not MS) standards. So no, it is not essentially in Beta. I have been using the new Edge for several days now (10 minutes is not a fair evaluation) and so far, like it. Every site I have visited has displayed properly. I can't say the same for FF or PM. And every pages loads quickly too. :)

The biggest problem with the new Edge is the brand name behind it. Too many, sadly, refuse to accept that Microsoft really does want its users to have a safe, stable, and enjoyable computing experience and fully believe, despite all the scrutiny Microsoft constantly receives, that Microsoft is out to get them and their data. :kookoo:

If you want your data out there, use Chrome.

I miss IE6 too. It never was the security risk all the MS bashers and FF fanboys claimed it was.
Posted on Reply
#40
bug
Bill_Bright
LOL No its not on both parts. It does use the Chromium open source engine but it is hardly a reskinned Chrome. And if the naysayers would just take a few minutes to read up on it, they would see it does MUCH more than Chrome to protect our data and privacy. See this and note where it talks about blocking 100s of Google tracking code by default - and that's on the medium or "balanced" setting. Move it to "Strict" and it really gets aggressive.
You want privacy, you don't compare to Chrome. You compare to Chromium, Firefox, Brave and probably a bunch of others I can't think of right now.
Posted on Reply
#41
Bill_Bright
bug
You want privacy, you don't compare to Chrome.
Of course you do. For sure, with Chrome coming from Google (by far, one of the most aggressive collectors and retailers of our personal data), I certainly will compare Edge to Chrome. In fact, I think that is completely appropriate since both Chrome and Edge use the Chromium engine.
Posted on Reply
#42
bug
Bill_Bright
Of course you do. For sure, with Chrome coming from Google (by far, one of the most aggressive collectors and retailers of our personal data), I certainly will compare Edge to Chrome. In fact, I think that is completely appropriate since both Chrome and Edge use the Chromium engine.
What? You talk privacy, but you'll compare Chrome and Edge because of the underlying engine? :wtf:
Posted on Reply
#43
Bill_Bright
bug
What? You talk privacy, but you'll compare Chrome and Edge because of the underlying engine?
Of course! Why shouldn't they be compared? It is not the engine that is doing the snooping. It is how that engine is being used by the end developer.

Are you suggesting Waterfox, SeaMonkey, Pale Moon and Brave should not be compared with Firefox simply because they are based on the same Mozilla engine?

Should the Hyundai Tucson not be compared with the Kia Sportage? Chevrolet TrailBlazer with the Saab 9-7x or GMC Envoy? Those vehicles are built on the exact same platform, should they not be compared. What about Beefeaters with Bombay? Both are London Dry Gins. Why not compare them?
Posted on Reply
#44
bug
Bill_Bright
Of course! Why shouldn't they be compared? It is not the engine that is doing the snooping. It is how that engine is being used by the end developer.

Are you suggesting Waterfox, SeaMonkey, Pale Moon and Brave should not be compared with Firefox simply because they are based on the same Mozilla engine?

Should the Hyundai Tucson not be compared with the Kia Sportage? Chevrolet TrailBlazer with the Saab 9-7x or GMC Envoy? Those vehicles are built on the exact same platform, should they not be compared. What about Beefeaters with Bombay? Both are London Dry Gins. Why not compare them?
I think there's a misunderstanding here.
My point was, if you care a bout privacy in a browser (Edge in our case), you don't compare it to Chrome. Chrome is a poor baseline for gauging privacy. You compare it to browsers known to fare well in the privacy department.
I hope I worded it better this time.
Posted on Reply
#45
Bill_Bright
bug
My point was, if you care a bout privacy in a browser (Edge in our case), you don't compare it to Chrome.
Okay, I see what you mean but again, I don't see why not.

I don't see it as a baseline issue at all. Why? Because I don't see any browser as setting a baseline.

The baseline, if you will, is 0 tracking, 0 personal information sent or collected. Period. That would be a "perfect" score.

If 0 is the baseline/perfect score and Chrome scores 20 while Edge scores 15, aren't you still comparing Chrome with Edge?
Posted on Reply
#46
bug
Bill_Bright
Okay, I see what you mean but again, I don't see why not.

I don't see it as a baseline issue at all. Why? Because I don't see any browser as setting a baseline.

The baseline, if you will, is 0 tracking, 0 personal information sent or collected. Period. That would be a "perfect" score.

If 0 is the baseline/perfect score and Chrome scores 20 while Edge scores 15, aren't you still comparing Chrome with Edge?
Yes, but now you have 3 references. Originally we were discussing only 2: Chrome vs Edge. I was just saying, if we're going that way, I'd rather see Edge vs Firefox/Chromium/Brave. That's all.
Posted on Reply
#47
Bill_Bright
bug
Yes, but now you have 3 references. Originally we were discussing only 2: Chrome vs Edge.
??? I thought we were finally on the same page but now you lost me. How is "Chrome vs Edge" not comparing Chrome with Edge?

Never mind. Another day has gone by and I am liking Edge more and more - if for no other reason than it is rendering every site and page I want to see quickly and flawlessly - exactly what I want my browser to do.
Posted on Reply
#48
lexluthermiester
When it comes to privacy, absolutely no one looks at any version of Chrome, Edge or IE and thinks "Yeah, my privacy is safe with this browser." which is why only the witless and/or ignorant use them.
Posted on Reply
#49
Bill_Bright
lexluthermiester
which is why only the witless and/or ignorant use them.
Wow! Can you get any more arrogant and condescending? I don't think do.

Any of those can safely be used be with just a little care. And for sure, this stand totally ignores the most important aspect of it all, and that is privacy is not the same as security.
Posted on Reply
#50
lexluthermiester
Bill_Bright
Wow! Can you get any more arrogant and condescending? I don't think do.
That's one interpretation. Here's another; It's experience. Anyone who has even a modicum of understanding of the needs of privacy and computing security knows better than to use those browsers, especially IE and Edge. With Chrome, a lot of people feel they can trust Google because they know what info Google says they collect and it's generally not personal but as that non-personal info can be used to identify an individual, the safety is limited and the privacy is only partial.

Bill_Bright
Any of those can safely be used be with just a little care.
That is simply false, again especially when we're talking about IE & Edge.
Bill_Bright
and that is privacy is not the same as security.
That depends on your perspective. There are many who consider them mutually inclusive and much the same.
Posted on Reply
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