Wednesday, February 19th 2020

ASUS Rolls Out TUF Gaming GT301 Case

ASUS today rolled out the TUF Gaming GT301 case for gaming PC builds meant for the road (i.e. BYO LANs). It's design is characterized by a mostly ABS front panel that has a honeycomb outer grille with a metal inner mesh, and inserts through which a nylon strap zig-zags through. The top panel features another mesh surface, while the left side panel is tempered glass. The rest of the case, including its inner chassis and right side panel, are made of SECC steel. Adding to the aesthetic are three included ARGB fans along the front intake. A fourth dark 120 mm fan vents exhaust. Two additional 120 mm spinners can be mounted along the top exhaust. A headphones hanger can be mounted on either side of the case.

Inside, the ASUS TUF Gaming GT301 features a conventional horizontally-partitioned layout, with the top compartment serving up room for graphics cards up to 32 cm in length, and CPU coolers up to 16 cm in height. Storage options include four 2.5-inch drive mounts along the motherboard tray, and two 3.5-inch drive bays in the bottom compartment. Front panel connectivity includes two USB 3.2 type-A ports, and HDA audio jacks. Measuring 426 mm x 214 mm x 482 mm (LxWxH), the case weighs around 7.2 kg. The company didn't reveal pricing.
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22 Comments on ASUS Rolls Out TUF Gaming GT301 Case

#2
Chomiq
DeathtoGnomes
is that a fabric strap on the front there?
Most likely yes, they have another one with strap on top, because everyone carries their rig to a lan party on a weekend.
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#4
Vayra86
OK, where do I begin...
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#5
Ferrum Master
Chomiq
because everyone carries their rig to a lan party on a weekend.
I have a dedicated rig for that. What's wrong with old school LP's?
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#6
webdigo
Why not make it with space for 140mm fans :(
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#7
Chomiq
Ferrum Master
I have a dedicated rig for that. What's wrong with old school LP's?
Nothing wrong with LP but that last case weighed 18kg, so was not really "portable".
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#8
Ferrum Master
Chomiq
Nothing wrong with LP but that last case weighed 18kg, so was not really "portable".
I haven't weighted mine... but does it matter? I usually use Taxi(as LP and beer goes hand in hand). The important bit is really a proper handle.
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#9
Rahnak
This may just be the ugliest case I've ever seen.
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#10
bonehead123
but...why ?

Even IF I were to go to a LP, I sure as hell would not wanna be totin this P.O.S. case with me, one because of the size & weight, the other for the utter embarassment of luggin such a fuuuugly-assed rig around.....
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#11
Ed_1
CPU air cooler height 160mm, Fail!
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#12
kapone32
Why do we not get native 140mm support on so many cases?
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#13
ShurikN
Ferrum Master
I haven't weighted mine... but does it matter? I usually use Taxi(as LP and beer goes hand in hand). The important bit is really a proper handle.
Usually when I think of Lan Party hardware in post 2017, I think of something like a mini-ITX and under 15L. Definitely not a full fat, 40L ATX case. Carrying handles or not.
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#15
GlacierNine
kapone32
Why do we not get native 140mm support on so many cases?
A few reasons.

1 - Most people don't need 140mm intakes anyway, they're simply not running hardware hot enough to benefit from the extra airflow.
2 - Reuse of old chassis tooling to get better return on investment in that tooling
3 - lack of 280 or 420mm radiator options, both in custom watercooling and AIO coolers means that 140mm fan mounts can make 240 or 360mm rads look like they don't belong in a case. Manufacturers want their stuff to look good with what consumers are actually buying.
4 - 120mm fans tend to have lower static pressure, so if a manufacturer is using a semi-restrictive intake, 120mm fans will overcome that more effectively.
5 - Far more available 120mm fan options, many of which users will carry over from older builds rather than buying all new 140mm fans for a new system.

All of this means cases will lag behind for a decent while after 140mm fans seem like the new big whoop. I personally think that the biggest problem is that 280/420mm AIOs won't exist until the cases exist to support them, whereas the case manufacturers are waiting for the AIOs to exist before they build larger, taller, wider chassis to accomodate them.
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#16
kapone32
GlacierNine
A few reasons.

1 - Most people don't need 140mm intakes anyway, they're simply not running hardware hot enough to benefit from the extra airflow.
2 - Reuse of old chassis tooling to get better return on investment in that tooling
3 - lack of 280 or 420mm radiator options, both in custom watercooling and AIO coolers means that 140mm fan mounts can make 240 or 360mm rads look like they don't belong in a case. Manufacturers want their stuff to look good with what consumers are actually buying.
4 - 120mm fans tend to have lower static pressure, so if a manufacturer is using a semi-restrictive intake, 120mm fans will overcome that more effectively.
5 - Far more available 120mm fan options, many of which users will carry over from older builds rather than buying all new 140mm fans for a new system.

All of this means cases will lag behind for a decent while after 140mm fans seem like the new big whoop. I personally think that the biggest problem is that 280/420mm AIOs won't exist until the cases exist to support them, whereas the case manufacturers are waiting for the AIOs to exist before they build larger, taller, wider chassis to accomodate them.
Interesting thought process however it could have applied 10 years ago. There are plenty of 280 AIOs and every Water cooling company offers 420MM rads. I used to be that guy but it is not just airflow that I choose 140MM fans, but also noise. A 140mm running at the same RPM as a 120mm will be much quieter. In this modern age of 8-64 core CPUs, 250W TDPs, fully covered front panels and tempered glass it only makes sense to me. I know what you mean about reusing equipment but case fans (for me) are the least worry in terms of retention when upgrading. 5 Arctic F14s are $34.99 on Amazon and they perform as good as my Noctua Redux. I currently have a ton of 120mm fans sitting around the lab from Arctic, Corsair, Cooler Master, Phanteks, Bit Fenix, Scythe, Thermalright, Noctua and Deepcool.
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#17
GlacierNine
kapone32
Interesting thought process however it could have applied 10 years ago. There are plenty of 280 AIOs
You're massively overestimating the prevalence of 280/420 parts. Let me illustrate this:

SCAN PC here in the UK lists 42 different 240mm AIOs on their site. They list only 16 280mm AIOs.

Additionally, two of the 240mm AIOs they offer, are marked "hot seller", whereas none of the 280mm models are, so despite competing against more than twice as many products, there are at least two 240mm AIOs that are outselling the most popular 280mm AIO SCAN has.

If we extrapolate from this, we can pretty easily conclude that 280mm AIO sales must be significantly less than half that of 240mm coolers (Since we know that the top selling 280 doesn't shift as many units as either one of the two top selling 240s).

That's if it's not a quarter, given that 42 240mm coolers will cannibalise each other's sales much more than 16 280mm coolers will cannibalise each other's.
kapone32
and every Water cooling company offers 420MM rads.
They do, but again, the same applies. Look at how many products there actually are out there for each. EKWB makes 18 different 120mm radiators. That's a single, dual, triple and quad fan model for each of 3 thicknesses, plus some "Classic" series radiators that take us from 12 models to 18.

On the other hand, they only make 8 models of 140mm radiator, and only in two thicknesses, with no "Classic" options available at all.

The market is not there, for EKWB to be able to produce as wide a range of 140mm products as they produce 120mm products. You can look at the available selection on any retailer or manufacturer's website to confirm this.
kapone32
I used to be that guy but it is not just airflow that I choose 140MM fans, but also noise. A 140mm running at the same RPM as a 120mm will be much quieter. In this modern age of 8-64 core CPUs, 250W TDPs, fully covered front panels and tempered glass it only makes sense to me. I know what you mean about reusing equipment but case fans (for me) are the least worry in terms of retention when upgrading. 5 Arctic F14s are $34.99 on Amazon and they perform as good as my Noctua Redux. I currently have a ton of 120mm fans sitting around the lab from Arctic, Corsair, Cooler Master, Phanteks, Bit Fenix, Scythe, Thermalright, Noctua and Deepcool.
A 140mm running at the same RPM as a 120 will also have less static pressure and perform worse as a radiator fan or on a restrictive intake, meaning it will need to spin faster to give equivalent pressure, meaning it isn't as efficient as you're trying to make out.

Also, what "makes sense to you" and what you do "for you", and what *you* own is irrelevant. Your purchases alone do not keep companies in business. The purchases of MANY consumers, most of whom are not you and don't buy what you buy, are what keeps companies in business.

Companies will produce what there is market demand for. IE, they'll make what they can sell. They can't sell as much 140mm stuff as they can 120mm stuff because the ecosystem doesn't exist to support that, and there are some drawbacks to going for 140mm fans that start to matter quite a lot once you're dealing with radiators. Particularly if you want to get better performance than a 360, which a 280mm AIO just can't manage, forcing you to 420mm, which only fits in comparitively huge cases that people don't want to have dominating their room.

That's the bottom line and there's no point bitching about that. 140mm fans aren't a magic bullet with no drawbacks. They're a thing for which there is a valid consumer audience, but that audience is enthusiasts, not "The majority of consumers".
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#18
cucker tarlson
U-G-L-Y she ain't got no alibi.

give asus a cheap walmart gaming case and an old backpack and watch them go.
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#19
micropage7
Looks like cheap case especially with that front bezel
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#20
drABcoat
43.9L volume LAN rig with no handle...sure, sounds perfect for travel.
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#21
gamefoo21
It has a velcro Bungie strap on the front of the case...

It's the ultimate in Tacti-cool now...

:laugh:
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#22
DeathtoGnomes
GlacierNine
You're massively overestimating the prevalence of 280/420 parts. Let me illustrate this:

SCAN PC here in the UK lists 42 different 240mm AIOs on their site. They list only 16 280mm AIOs.

Additionally, two of the 240mm AIOs they offer, are marked "hot seller", whereas none of the 280mm models are, so despite competing against more than twice as many products, there are at least two 240mm AIOs that are outselling the most popular 280mm AIO SCAN has.

If we extrapolate from this, we can pretty easily conclude that 280mm AIO sales must be significantly less than half that of 240mm coolers (Since we know that the top selling 280 doesn't shift as many units as either one of the two top selling 240s).

That's if it's not a quarter, given that 42 240mm coolers will cannibalise each other's sales much more than 16 280mm coolers will cannibalise each other's.

They do, but again, the same applies. Look at how many products there actually are out there for each. EKWB makes 18 different 120mm radiators. That's a single, dual, triple and quad fan model for each of 3 thicknesses, plus some "Classic" series radiators that take us from 12 models to 18.

On the other hand, they only make 8 models of 140mm radiator, and only in two thicknesses, with no "Classic" options available at all.

The market is not there, for EKWB to be able to produce as wide a range of 140mm products as they produce 120mm products. You can look at the available selection on any retailer or manufacturer's website to confirm this.

A 140mm running at the same RPM as a 120 will also have less static pressure and perform worse as a radiator fan or on a restrictive intake, meaning it will need to spin faster to give equivalent pressure, meaning it isn't as efficient as you're trying to make out.

Also, what "makes sense to you" and what you do "for you", and what *you* own is irrelevant. Your purchases alone do not keep companies in business. The purchases of MANY consumers, most of whom are not you and don't buy what you buy, are what keeps companies in business.

Companies will produce what there is market demand for. IE, they'll make what they can sell. They can't sell as much 140mm stuff as they can 120mm stuff because the ecosystem doesn't exist to support that, and there are some drawbacks to going for 140mm fans that start to matter quite a lot once you're dealing with radiators. Particularly if you want to get better performance than a 360, which a 280mm AIO just can't manage, forcing you to 420mm, which only fits in comparitively huge cases that people don't want to have dominating their room.

That's the bottom line and there's no point bitching about that. 140mm fans aren't a magic bullet with no drawbacks. They're a thing for which there is a valid consumer audience, but that audience is enthusiasts, not "The majority of consumers".
not doubting your wall of text, but the fact remains that there are better informed enthusiasts that do want 140mm "stuff". It does not matter one bit that 'some' companies dont offer "more" 140mm items. What matters is that the companies that do sell the items will see the cash of those do want 140mm items. Its called shopping around, someone will offer what is wanted.

Glad I'm not most people.
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