Wednesday, March 11th 2020

Keep an Eye Out for March 19, Says NVIDIA

NVIDIA's ANZ (Australia and New Zealand) Twitter handle posted a curious-looking teaser of something to look forward to on March 19. The now-deleted Tweet contained an animation showing the shape of an eye tracking two points of light crossing its iris. This date falls just a couple of days ahead of the March 22 debut of GTC 2020, the NVIDIA-promoted trade-show covering all things graphics tech. As many on the tweet and online forums discussing have pointed out, the announcement could probably be related to a commercial release of NVIDIA's foveated rendering technology that was demonstrated way back at SIGGRAPH 2016, at a time when VR and related technologies were all the rage.

The concept of foveated rendering is straightforward: eye-tracking is leveraged to ensure that areas of the frame you're looking at are rendered in greater detail than the others, to conserve system resources and improve performance. This is achieved by tracking your foveal vision (the primary part of your vision focused on detail), while shedding resources on parts of the frame that fall within your peripheral vision. Compared to 2016, rendering technologies to facilitate foveated rendering have advanced. A related technology is variable shading rate (VRS), which allows an application to render different parts of the scene at different levels of detail, and improve performance.
A video presentation detailing NVIDIA's foveated rendering tech from 2016 follows.

Source: /u/wye (Reddit)
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17 Comments on Keep an Eye Out for March 19, Says NVIDIA

#1
lynx29
Any chance we might get a new product launch? It's not impossible. They will want to be AMD to the punch if big navi 2 is any actual threat.
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#2
_Flare
There is a very interesting statement on the Wikipedia for foveated rendering.
According to chief scientist Michael Abrash at Oculus, utilising foveated rendering in conjunction with sparse rendering and deep learning image reconstruction has the potential to require only one twentieth of the pixels to be rendered in comparison to a full image.
My assumtion is, this could eventually make pure real-time raytracing without any rasterization more viable in eyetracking VR than on a "normal" screen, because minimizing the pixelwork to one twentieth is huge.
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#3
spnidel
_FlareThere is a very interesting statement on the Wikipedia for foveated rendering.
According to chief scientist Michael Abrash at Oculus, utilising foveated rendering in conjunction with sparse rendering and deep learning image reconstruction has the potential to require only one twentieth of the pixels to be rendered in comparison to a full image.
My assumtion is, this could eventually make pure real-time raytracing without any rasterization more viable in eyetracking VR than on a "normal" screen, because minimizing the pixelwork to one twentieth is huge.
don't get your hopes up
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#4
lexluthermiester
Perhaps this is a prelude to a VR advancement in the upcoming RTX 30xx series of GPU's..
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#5
silentbogo
btarunrA related technology is variable shading rate (VRS), which allows an application to render different parts of the scene at different levels of detail, and improve performance.
It's only slightly/distantly/remotely related to VRS (basically they only share idea of saving GPU resources by rendering less where not needed).
It's more of a continuation of DLSS. Recently I've stumbled upon this and this, a recently published paper by Facebook Research.
What I think NV is trying to do is combine DeepFovea and DLSS in order to speed up VR tremendously, especially with their impressive progress on making "universal" DLSS work.
I won't be surprised if it's a full-blown collab between oculus and nvidia in order to push both VR, RT and AI to much wider audience.
If anything interesting comes up, I might need to borrow OSVR from my buddy again.
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#6
CrAsHnBuRnXp
lynx29Any chance we might get a new product launch? It's not impossible. They will want to be AMD to the punch if big navi 2 is any actual threat.
I cant remember the last time an AMD card was a legitimate threat to nVIDIA.
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#7
kapone32
CrAsHnBuRnXpI cant remember the last time an AMD card was a legitimate threat to nVIDIA.
Tahiti
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#9
CrAsHnBuRnXp
Im anxiously waiting the 3080TI. Im never not getting a TI card again. Even if it's $2000.
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#10
ZoneDymo
CrAsHnBuRnXpIm anxiously waiting the 3080TI. Im never not getting a TI card again. Even if it's $2000.
Thought your username was "Cashburn" which seemed appropriate but I missread.
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#13
lynx29
CrAsHnBuRnXpI cant remember the last time an AMD card was a legitimate threat to nVIDIA.
My 7950 I flashed to a 7970 and overclocked was cheap, had more vram, and stomped the more expensive gtx 680. Those were good times. Also, before that the only way I could afford to play WoW at launch in 2004 was an Ati AGP card, so AMD was always there for me, even when I was a broke teen. For that reason alone I owe them a chance again. My upgrade path is pretty sexy, 3600 will become 4800x or 4900x, and gpu will become Big Navi 2 flagship, cause yolo and all that.
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#15
CrAsHnBuRnXp
ARFOn April 8, 2014, AMD launched the mighty Radeon R9 295X2, so fast it was crazy:
That was their very first HBM or whatever card right? Basically two cards stuck into 1 like nvidia did years prior. Id expect it to be faster. But it's been a long time since AMD really competed on nvidias high end.
ARF
Gotta have gems in the turd. :)
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#16
John Naylor
CrAsHnBuRnXpI cant remember the last time an AMD card was a legitimate threat to nVIDIA.
I keep rooting for AMD to get a horse in the race at the upper end but recent years have not gone AMDs way

With all cards overclocked

Nvidia 7xx series => Nvidia 780 Ti / 780 were faster than anything AMD had, giving Nvidia the top two tiers
Nvidia 9xx series =>Nvidia took the 3d tier with the 970 outselling all AMD cards combined
Nvidia 10xx series =>Nvidia took the 4th tier with the 1060
Nvidia 10xx series =>Too many concurrent cards with AMDs XT and Nvidias Supers ... but at this point in time, we don't see an attractive choice here for AMD above the 5600 XT

If we look at market share, I had forgotten how long it's been since it was close ....There was a tie in 2005; 10 years since AMD climbed with in 10 percentage points and more than5 years since they been within 50 points



Right now the ration is 5:1

nVidia @ 74.4 %
AMD @ 15.7%
Intel @ 9.74

My frustration is that's it's OK to be No. 2, focusing mainly on the low to mid-priced market. My fear is after years of "AMDs new whatever is going to change everything" .. when that product comes to market and it doesn't change anything, over and over and over again, people stop paying attention. AMD was like the Boston Red Sox or the Chicago Cubs ... always getting fans hopes up ...sometimes looking promising (with out of box testing) and then losing out in the end . But the Sox and the Cubs did have their day and I hope to see AMD get theirs one day ... In the meantime, AMD should just play to their strengths and dump the "gonna change everything" marketing strategy, compete strongly in the market niches they can. Putting a card like the Radeon VII on the market and then having to make such severe price cuts hurts the bottom line, taking money away that could be spent on the next design.

Nvidia took one tier at a time, after grabbing 1 and 2, next gen they went foir tier 3 .... next tier 4. AMD methinks should do the same ... chase the 1660 Ti vategory ... and forget about what's above it for now .... next move up to the 2060. The most popular last gen card in use today is the 1060 (12.7%) followed by th 1050 Ti (9.1%) ... the most popular current gen cards are the 1660 Ti and 2060. This is the niche that will bring in the most cash if not the most headlines. By grabbing some of nVidia's gravy train, they can cut nvidia's R&D budget and can put some of that money into their own.
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