Wednesday, May 20th 2020

G.SKILL DDR4 Memory Reaches Extreme Speeds with 10th Gen Intel Core Processors

G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world's leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory and gaming peripherals, is always exploring the extreme limits of the latest computing platforms. With the latest release of the 10th Gen Intel Core processors and Intel Z490 chipset-based motherboards, G.SKILL demonstrates that DDR4 memory is capable of reaching a higher tier of extreme speed than ever before, at up to DDR4-5000 MHz with 8 GB and 16 GB memory modules, as well as DDR4-4400 with high-capacity 32 GB modules.

Memory capacity has come a long way, where a 64 GB kit used to require 8 memory modules. Now, 64 GB is achievable with two high-density 32 GB modules, and G.SKILL shows that a massive capacity 32 GB x2 kit is capable of an incredible DDR4-4400 with CL19-26-26-46 timings. Stress tested on the latest Z490 platform and 10th Gen Intel Core processors, see below for screenshots of the memory kit running on the ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XII FORMULA motherboard with an Intel Core i7-10700K processor and the ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XII APEX with an Intel Core i9-10900K processor.
The DDR4-4400 16GBx2 Low-Latency CL17 Challenge
Pushing the extreme limits of low latency at high frequency speed, G.SKILL validates a 16GBx2 kit at DDR4-4400 with an extremely low latency of CL17-18-18-38 timings on the ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XII EXTREME motherboard and an Intel Core i9-10900K processor. See the screenshot of this low-latency spectacle above.

Breaching DDR4-5000 Across the Board
DDR4-5000 is a major memory frequency milestone, and on the latest Intel Z490 chipset platform, G.SKILL has successfully reached this DDR4-5000 CL19 landmark achievement with 8GBx2 capacity on motherboards from multiple vendors, including the ASUS ROG MAXIMUS XII APEX, ASRock Z490 AQUA, and MSI MEG Z490 GODLIKE motherboards running with Intel Core i9-10900K and i9-10900KF processors. See below for the stress test screenshots on these systems
Raising the bar of running DDR4-5000 to the next capacity level, the screenshot below shows a kit of DDR4-5000 CL19-26-26-46 16GBx2 stress testing with an Intel Core i9-10900K.
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8 Comments on G.SKILL DDR4 Memory Reaches Extreme Speeds with 10th Gen Intel Core Processors

#1
E-curbi
The recent buzz has been Comet Lake's IMC had been improved, but it doesn't seem to be by much.

4800 to 5000.

And only a very small percentage of CML processors will actually run that 5000 CL19 26 26 46 kit at the rated XMP values.

Still the good news is, it seems many of the Z490 4dimm boards are capable of running 4600Mhz and 4800Mhz with only 2dimms installed, whereas last gen only a handful of 2dimm performance boards could actually pull that off - a rising tide lifts all ships effect - so many more can enjoy the amazing responsiveness of high speed memory. :)

Maybe Rocket Lake will give us 5200Mhz before we transition to ddr5.

_____

Gskill remaining with the Royal Gold and Silver aesthetic, hmmm that's extremely interesting, had heard rumors of new Royal Silver Blackout modules to be released, something like a black-chrome variant, which should look very nice. :)

Something puzzling, while the Apex XII moves from 4800Mhz to 5000Mhz, the Z490 Dark remains stuck at 4600Mhz, oh well :ohwell:


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#2
RandallFlagg
This is one of the things I would like to see. I peruse the PCMark benchmarks, and one of the things notable there is how a big percentage top ranked of Intel 9th gen are getting 4200+ DDR4 working. Many of the AMD systems seem to top out at 3600. This affects their overall system performance significantly, and helps explain why intel dominates on the PCMark rankings.

Now with 10th gen Z490 supporting very high speeds, I'd like to see some tests with low latency DDR4-4000+ along the lines of the TridenZ CL17 RGB RAM.
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#3
jjxaker
DDR4 4800/5000Mhz at vccsa 1.25, no? then it’s not interesting at all. vccsa v1.45, significantly increase the heating of the cpu. between vccsa 1.0 and 1.45 the difference is 12-15 degrees for cpu.
10900k and so the stove at 5200Mhz for all cores. even a custom cooling system will not help in the case of avx tests. with such overclocking of memory and even more so.
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#4
noel_fs
who cares just release yet another platform with ddr5
Posted on Reply
#6
E-curbi
jjxaker
DDR4 4800/5000Mhz at vccsa 1.25, no? then it’s not interesting at all. vccsa v1.45, significantly increase the heating of the cpu. between vccsa 1.0 and 1.45 the difference is 12-15 degrees for cpu.
10900k and so the stove at 5200Mhz for all cores. even a custom cooling system will not help in the case of avx tests. with such overclocking of memory and even more so.
Yup, I get what you're saying.

Luckily, I guess, my 2-year old 8th gen - 8086K's IMC won't run over 4600Mhz (unless I turn everything else in bios to OFF), no matter how much VCCSA voltage I throw at it.

Running VCCSA at 1.267v, for 4500Mhz 17-17-17-37, with no significant thermal issues on air. But then, it's only a 6core 12thread CPU. lol :)

I don't want to run high VCCSA either, want to maintain air-cooling, so I may be looking at Meteor Lake 7nm, 2022 and ddr5 for my next platform - no problem waiting - I love what I have and 4500/17 runs my work apps super-fast.

Daily Overclocks:



edit: wait a minute, what if the new Comet Lake IMC is able to utilize 1.45v as a normal voltage, with no added degradation or crazy high heat production? Yes the core architecture is the same as Coffee Lake and 1.45v VCCSA is HIGH for 8000 and 9000 CPUs but do we really know what's considered excessive VCCSA for Comet Lake? :confused:

I'm watching a Buildzoid CML OC video and he's throwing all kinds of watts at the 10900K and keeping it cool with a 280mm AIO. So yea do we really know? :confused:

10900K 0.5mm die thickness vs 9900K 0.8mm die thickness

Comet Lake core and ddr4 overclocking video below:

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#8
Hawkster222
As a owner of 4000Mhz ram , to who ever goes higher enjoy the blue-screens my guy/girl :)
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