Thursday, June 4th 2020

LG Launches 38WN95C-W Monitor: 38" Nano IPS, QHD+, 144 Hz - 170 Hz, 1 ms, Adaptive-Sync, 2300R, VESA DisplayHDR 600

LG today launched their new 38WN95C-W monitor, right alongside a more barebones offering (38WN95C-G) and a gaming-oriented cousin, the 38WN95C-B. Differences are small between the three, so we'll get into the nitty-gritty with the 38WN95C-W. This monitor features a 38" Nano IPS panel with a quoted 1 ms response time, which offers what LG calls QHD+ (3840 x 1600) resolution and an up to 170 Hz refresh rate (via overclocking through the monitor's own OSD; the original, non-overclocked refresh rate stands at a still very respectable 144 Hz). The monitor supports Active-Sync technologies in the form of AMD's FreeSync and NVIDIA's G-Sync via the now ubiquitous "G-Sync Compatible" program, albeit with a VRR range set between 48 Hz and 144 Hz) with LFC (Low Framerate Compensation). There's a 1000:1 contrast ratio, a VESA DisplayHDR 600 certification (activated in lieu of the typical 450 cd/m² brightness) and 98% DCI-P3 colour gamut coverage.

The monitor offers tilt and height adjustment, a 100mm VESA mount, and I/O is taken care of by 1x Thunderbolt 3 (high speed USB-C with DP Alt mode and PD), 1x DP 1.4, 2x HDMI 2.0 ports, 2x USB 3.0 ports (plus upstream), and 1x 3.5 mm headphone jack (besides the usual 2x 2 W speakers). The 'G' model lacks the Thunderbolt 3 port and additional HDMI 2.0 port of this model. The 38WN95C-G's only difference to this monitor is the lack of the ThunderBolt port and only 1x HDMI 2.0. The gaming-centric version, the 38WN95C-B, further cuts the built-in speakers - but offers an RGB ring for added bling. The LG 38WN95C-W is already available for pre-order with prices starting at $1,599.
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11 Comments on LG Launches 38WN95C-W Monitor: 38" Nano IPS, QHD+, 144 Hz - 170 Hz, 1 ms, Adaptive-Sync, 2300R, VESA DisplayHDR 600

#1
Camm
I'm interested in the G version, if only to see pricing. LG's pricing on their 38" range has been stratopherically high (as in I bought a 65" LG OLED for the same price high). 38" is a good size (I'm typing on the 75hz version of it now), but twice the price of a high refresh 34" panel is ridiculous.
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#2
lynx29
that is a hell of a lot of money... might as well just buy the new LG 2020 48" OLED at that point, pass. this doesn't even have HDMI 2.1. the LG has that plus native 120hz 4k and gsync compatible (and its cheaper than this and better picture quality... do I need to keep going on?) if you need 21:9 this bad buy something else cheaper and use the rest of the money to save for that OLED
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#3
mtcn77
QDOT or QDEF equivalent? It is left for the imagination.
Though, I highly regard pairing QDOT with IPS is very much important. It cannot have enough of contrast.
lynx29
that is a hell of a lot of money...
It works like a charm it seems to me. 450lux is quite out of the ordinary. You have to see it in person. With respect to QDEF, QDOT is better, imo. You get more spectral variation with QDOT, it doesn't procure the same wavelength at all luminosities. The colour of the wavelength band changes according to the luma profile. It is not as intense, but more native.
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#4
lynx29
mtcn77
QDOT or QDEF equivalent? It is left for the imagination.
Though, I highly regard pairing QDOT with IPS is very much important. It cannot have enough of contrast.


It works like a charm it seems to me. 450lux is quite out of the ordinary. You have to see it in person. With respect to QDEF, QDOT is better, imo. You get more spectral variation with QDOT, it doesn't procure the same wavelength at all luminosities. The colour of the wavelength band changes according to the luma profile. It is not as intense, but more native.
no idea what you mean by 450 lux or qdef, does this monitor have qdef? qdot is samsung only correct? so i am guessing this is qdef
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#5
mtcn77
lynx29
no idea what you mean by 450 lux or qdef, does this monitor have qdef? qdot is samsung only correct? so i am guessing this is qdef
You are a good pal, that is correct.
I'm just using my past knowledge on nexus 7 vs. amazon kindle fire hd at displaymate.com.
Lux is very important. It is what markets these products. It is hard to push more light out of the same transistor transmittance window. Each of these are essentially miniature led diodes. You get degredation of the anode – much like batteries and cpus wearing out. The fundamental problem thus is how far you can charge the leds. It isn't all that much if you want reliability. If I were to enable 550lux over my nexus 7, the screen would lose brightness over time.

Also, this suits ips since it is the most light filtering technology and va doesn't translate well to mobile factor scaling, however the benefits are still there. If they did 5500 contrast ratio before, they would easily top that with this tech.
It is in the backplane guide, like a fresnel lens, but 3d nanodots speckled around. It is quite remarkable. I haven't seen this good display of nanotech anywhere.
I wish my display's waveguide had it. It is like having igzo, or you know those sharp 321 displays – but better.
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#6
R-T-B
lynx29
qdot is samsung only correct?
Quantom Dot is basically an industry standard with many names depending on brand. It's really just an additional particle/film added to the TFT display that glows more brightly when exposed to the backlight.

Think of it this way: They can't fix the grey blacks any better than they already have, so they are raising contrast ratio a different way: By making the bright points brighter.
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#7
mtcn77
This goes hand in hand with ltps and also the fresnel grooves that mimic the carapace found on the light organ of a firefly. As it turns out, light bounces back upon a dark medium. It becomes easier to break up the recoiling rays and guide them when presenting fiberoptic ends for it to break through its medium.
PS: for all I know there is a sum of 3 technologies upon this layer. Qdot is the fiberoptic cylindrical pillars of equal height and length. LTPS is the discontinuous layer formation(the more crystals there is, the merrier it gets). There is one other which I have not heard about which is slanted grooves. Afaik, these haven't been used in lcds since they are primarily a led tech.
www.extremetech.com/extreme/145696-firefly-technology-leds
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#8
Chrispy_
R-T-B
Quantom Dot is basically an industry standard with many names depending on brand. It's really just an additional particle/film added to the TFT display that glows more brightly when exposed to the backlight.

Think of it this way: They can't fix the grey blacks any better than they already have, so they are raising contrast ratio a different way: By making the bright points brighter.
This is why I hate Quantum dot TVs.
Meeting the HDR contrast spec by searing out your retinas is not a good way to do HDR.
Posted on Reply
#9
mtcn77
Chrispy_
This is why I hate Quantum dot TVs.
Meeting the HDR contrast spec by searing out your retinas is not a good way to do HDR.
Must be the gamma. You can flatten gamma if screen brightness can go much higher.
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#10
Mega-Japan
Been wanting to upgrade my 34" 21:9 Acer for one of these for a while, but at this rate, I might as well keep on waiting.
Perhaps next year's will bring the VESA-1000 certification, HDMI 2.1, and perhaps a less ridiculous price tag.... Well, one can hope.
Posted on Reply
#11
Fry178
lol at that price ill rather get a 49/55X900H, which is native 120 and has VRR,
color gamut and calibrated out of the box its even decent for editing (consumer) stuff.
and turning off most processing when gaming, does reduce input lag to what i had on a 60Hz moni i had a few years back.
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