Friday, June 5th 2020

LG's 48-inch OLED Gaming TV with G-SYNC Goes on Sale This Month

LG is preparing to launch its latest addition to the gaming lineup of panels and this time it goes big. Preparing to launch this month is LG's 48-inch OLED Gaming TV with 120 HZ refreshing and G-SYNC support. To round up the impressive feature set, LG has priced this panel at $1499, which is a pricey but a tempting buy. Featuring 1 ms response time and low input lag, the 48CX TV is designed for gaming and fits into NVIDIA's Big Format Gaming Display (BFGD) philosophy. Interestingly, the TV uses LG's a9 Gen3 AI processor which does content upscaling so everything can look nice and crisp. Ai is used to "authentically upscale lower resolution content, translating the source to 4K's 8.3+ million pixels. The technology is so good, you might mistake non-4K for true 4K"
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131 Comments on LG's 48-inch OLED Gaming TV with G-SYNC Goes on Sale This Month

#76
Prince Valiant
Shave off 16" - 21" and cut all the TV "features" and this would be of interest.

"The technology is so good, you might mistake non-4K for true 4K "
I highly doubt it unless there are a bunch of asterisks.
Posted on Reply
#77
R-T-B
Chrispy_
I very much doubt an old 120Hz VA is remotely close to 8.3ms response. Only newer panels can manage this and even then a good number of them struggle to get the overdrive right on black transitions.

VA panels that could manage 120Hz without smearing didn't even exist until 2018.
My VA panel was a 2019... I still use it downstairs. And yes it's response time is close. It's a 120hz LG 850F series. www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-32GK850F-B-gaming-monitor
Chrispy_
Actually, it looks like LG solved HDR + BFI back in early 2018. Since HDR messes around with brightness one would assume that in solving that with BFI they've also managed to solve VRR?
Sadly, no. The BFI is at a fixed 120hz.
Metroid
Reviewers said degradation on hdr will happen every year with oled tv's plus the chance of burning. Current OLED tv's are only good for the first 5 years then you can thow at bin resell or do something else with it as is better to buy a new one.
That's really false. OLED burn in is multitudes better than plasma, and even though it exists, it can mitigated and is not really a huge issue anymore. Heck, I worked around plasma and it was supposedly the worst.

This figure is actually from LG corperate research on their panel lifetime. It's not bad. This is the closest to the present model I can find, though technically we won't see this panel until at least a year or two.



Older model 2018 panel specs for reference:



Regardless of use case, you are talking around 50 years to 50% brightness.
bug
www.rtings.com/tv/learn/real-life-oled-burn-in-test
They stopped running that test a while ago and even they admitted it isn't really relevant to gaming if you "don't game the same game constantly with a static HUD"
Posted on Reply
#78
Metroid
R-T-B
They stopped running that test a while ago and even they admitted it isn't really relevant to gaming if you "don't game the same game constantly with a static HUD"
The first generation compared to today is huge, it used to be a lot lot more prone to burn in than nowadays, burn in happens when tv's are left on for long hours to weeks, as long you turn off the tv now and then, the chances are very low but even if happens $1000 usd for a tv 5 in 5 years is not a big deal for me.
Posted on Reply
#79
cucker tarlson
lynx29
ULMB is nice and all but it has always made games too dark imo.
not on TNs
Posted on Reply
#80
lynx29
cucker tarlson
not on TNs
I'd still prefer color accuracy over ULMB and my current DCI-P3 of 98% IPS over TN any day.
Posted on Reply
#81
cucker tarlson
lynx29
I'd still prefer color accuracy over ULMB and my current DCI-P3 of 98% IPS over TN any day.
they're separate aspects completely.

had ipses before,can't stand the silverish tint and glow.internet pages look fancy tho.
Posted on Reply
#82
Chrispy_
R-T-B
My VA panel was a 2019... I still use it downstairs. And yes it's response time is close. It's a 120hz LG 850F series. www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-32GK850F-B-gaming-monitor
Ah okay, it's normal to quote the maximum refresh of your panel when talking about monitors so I assumed you meant you had a pre-144Hz panel from 2013 or something.
I have a 48Hz gaming monitor, just to be pedantic ;)
Posted on Reply
#83
bug
cucker tarlson
they're separate aspects completely.

had ipses before,can't stand the silverish tint and glow.internet pages look fancy tho.
I'm looking at an IPS right now (next to a TN panel), I can't spot the glow to save my life. You have to look at a lot of dark stuff to see the IPS glow. I'm currently running a dark theme and it's not enough to make it apparent. Then again, I have my setup calibrated at 120cd/sqm, that probably helps.
Posted on Reply
#84
phanbuey
I love IPS' but they give me massive headaches if I don't control the brightness all the time. Never had an issue with TN, even at retina-searing brightness levels.

For whatever reason after a few hours of non-gaming work in front of a large IPS monitor I always need to go lay down a bit.

My next monitor will be a high speed 27" TN at 1440P preferably curved.
Posted on Reply
#85
cucker tarlson
bug
You have to look at a lot of dark stuff to see the IPS glow.
that'd be accurate.
Posted on Reply
#86
Hotobu
R-T-B
Also the new CX line is not fully HDMI 2.1 compliant like the C/B9's were. They are only 40gbps, and don't meet the spec, oddly. Still can do 4K at 10bit fine though.
While true, this is a non factor. These TVs don't get bright enough to display 12 bit color.
Posted on Reply
#87
R-T-B
Hotobu
While true, this is a non factor. These TVs don't get bright enough to display 12 bit color.
Brightness really isn't the limiting factor to color gamut on these, and I think you'd be surprised.

It's indeed a small issue though.
Metroid
The first generation compared to today is huge, it used to be a lot lot more prone to burn in than nowadays, burn in happens when tv's are left on for long hours to weeks, as long you turn off the tv now and then, the chances are very low but even if happens $1000 usd for a tv 5 in 5 years is not a big deal for me.
I'm aware, look at the charts I posted. Big changes over the years.
Posted on Reply
#88
Dredi
R-T-B
Brightness really isn't the limiting factor to color gamut on these, and I think you'd be surprised.
Brightness and colour gamut are quite separate things.
8bit is ok for brightness of up to ~80nits in a dark room, any brighter and you can easily see (greyscale) banding in dark scenes.
If we assume the same ”dark room” setting, in order to raise the maximum brightness without introducing banding to equally dark scenes (in nits) as before you need an extra bit of brightness information every time you double the max brightness in nits.

So 10bits is fine for 320 nits or so, 12 bits for 1200 nits etc.

For colour gradation 8bits was ok for rec.709. Just one bit more actually gives you better colour gradation for rec.2020 gamut.

The two combined, 10bits is fine for rec.2020 at 160 nits max brightness and 12 bits would be ok for up to 640 nits. This is true for ”raw data” i.e. pc use. In encoded HDR formats used in films etc. they do all kinds of trickery such as also give the min and max brightness for each frame and thus in most content just 10 bits is enough.
Posted on Reply
#89
Chomiq
Well B9 and C9 have 12-bit panel, right? CX has a 10-bit panel, so even if it would support pec of 48gbps you wouldn't be able to actually see the full 12-bit signal due to the panel being 10-bit.
Posted on Reply
#90
Chrispy_
R-T-B
They stopped running that test a while ago and even they admitted it isn't really relevant to gaming if you "don't game the same game constantly with a static HUD"
Just a PSA here - gaming on OLED seems fine, even if you play a lot of the same game - but I would avoid using OLED as a monitor still
Posted on Reply
#91
Dredi
Chomiq
Well B9 and C9 have 12-bit panel, right? CX has a 10-bit panel, so even if it would support pec of 48gbps you wouldn't be able to actually see the full 12-bit signal due to the panel being 10-bit.
That’s actually quite worrying for people who calibrate to dark room environments and watch rec.709 footage. If the panel is truly only 10bits and the peak brightness of the panel is 800 nits, you get less than 7bits of grayscale gradation if calibrated to 80 nits (standard value for dark room SDR viewing). It’s going to look like shit. I can try to verify this in a week or so as my friend bought one.

LCD screens are better in this regard, as the backlight is a separately controllable variable and adjusting it does not effectively affect the bit depth of the panel.
Posted on Reply
#92
lexluthermiester
Hyderz
That is too big to be placed on a desk to use isn't it?
Agreed. The largest displays I'm willing to use are 32". Currently I have a pair of 27" displays which, for me, feels like a sweetspot.
Posted on Reply
#93
bug
Dredi
That’s actually quite worrying for people who calibrate to dark room environments and watch rec.709 footage. If the panel is truly only 10bits and the peak brightness of the panel is 800 nits, you get less than 7bits of grayscale gradation if calibrated to 80 nits (standard value for dark room SDR viewing). It’s going to look like shit. I can try to verify this in a week or so as my friend bought one.

LCD screens are better in this regard, as the backlight is a separately controllable variable and adjusting it does not effectively affect the bit depth of the panel.
That's why these come with Dolby Vision IQ ;)
Posted on Reply
#94
R-T-B
Chrispy_
Just a PSA here - gaming on OLED seems fine, even if you play a lot of the same game - but I would avoid using OLED as a monitor still
I do on a daily basis, did it with Plasma for years too. It's fine with some viewing habit changes. But that alone requires a change in user behavior, so it's not for everyone.
Chomiq
CX has a 10-bit panel
Is that so? I'd still be surprised if it could not eek out an additional 2-bits via FRC, but even so, I never heard of this and I am quite in the know here. Have a link?
Posted on Reply
#95
Hotobu
Vince had a video where he went into the dev mode of the CX and showed it was a 10 bit panel.

Also put me in the crowd of people who are fine with OLED as a monitor. I had a first gen LG OLED that I replaced with a current model after 4 years (I damaged it) with 0 burn in. RTINGS showed the level of use that it takes for burn in, and that's with HEAVY use of a specific type of content. Varied content with "normal" usage should be fine.
Posted on Reply
#96
bug
Hotobu
Vince had a video where he went into the dev mode of the CX and showed it was a 10 bit panel.

Also put me in the crowd of people who are fine with OLED as a monitor. I had a first gen LG OLED that I replaced with a current model after 4 years (I damaged it) with 0 burn in. RTINGS showed the level of use that it takes for burn in, and that's with HEAVY use of a specific type of content. Varied content with "normal" usage should be fine.
Desktop environments tend to put the taskbar and menus always at the same spot. It's the worst case scenario for OLED (especially combined with bright theme and over the top brightness), but that can be worked around. That is, if we could actually buy a decent OLED monitor.
Posted on Reply
#97
R-T-B
bug
That is, if we could actually buy a decent OLED monitor.
I mean these tvs are already excellent as monitors, if you obey said work arounds. They support chroma 444, VRR, lfc, all that good stuff.
Posted on Reply
#98
Hotobu
bug
Desktop environments tend to put the taskbar and menus always at the same spot. It's the worst case scenario for OLED (especially combined with bright theme and over the top brightness), but that can be worked around. That is, if we could actually buy a decent OLED monitor.
The taskbar can be set to auto hide, and if a person's use is such that they are looking at the same menu/hud for 50+% of their content they probably don't need OLED anyway. "Regular" use for most people is highly varied content.
Posted on Reply
#99
Valantar
lexluthermiester
Agreed. The largest displays I'm willing to use are 32". Currently I have a pair of 27" displays which, for me, feels like a sweetspot.
Hotobu
The taskbar can be set to auto hide, and if a person's use is such that they are looking at the same menu/hud for 50+% of their content they probably don't need OLED anyway. "Regular" use for most people is highly varied content.
No. Most people are creatures of habit, and regular PC use for them is quite routine. A small selection of applications, probably with the web browser being the main thing.
Posted on Reply
#100
Chomiq
R-T-B
Is that so? I'd still be surprised if it could not eek out an additional 2-bits via FRC, but even so, I never heard of this and I am quite in the know here. Have a link?
I think they mention it here.
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