Thursday, June 11th 2020

Sony Showcases Two PlayStation 5 Console Versions, Platform-Exclusive Next Generation Games

Sony today via a livestream finally showcased their hardware design for the next generation of consoles, and let's get one thing right out of the way: the company will be launching two console versions. This is a relatively unexpected twist - unexpected, because if anything, we were expecting two new consoles from Microsoft (remember the Lockhart rumors?), not from Sony. However, the PS5 will be eventually launching in two versions - a mainline console, and an all-digital spinoff.

For now, details are all but absent - the only thing we know for sure is that the digital version of the PS5 won't be carrying a 4K BluRay player. That will undoubtedly reduce the final pricing of the digital version compared to the mainline console. It's unclear whether this console has some sort of streaming integration with a service such as PS Now, offloading games processing to the cloud. If it doesn't, though, and if the only hardware difference between the two versions is the presence of the 4K BluRay player, we're likely talking about a $100/€100 difference - tops. Remember that the Xbox One S, which currently retails for around $250, too possesses a 4K Blu Ray player, so there's only so much that can be recouped from cutting that particular hardware piece. As you might've guessed by now, pricing is still being manifested as if it were a unicorn.

The overall PS5 design is a sleek combination of whites and blues - something that was already teased with the Dual Sense controller reveal. The design is like that of a sleek spacecraft, with organic curves, blue lighting and an Alienware-esque outlook, and is nothing like some expected the console to be in terms of size. It remains to be seen how Sony has managed to dissipate the heat being output by the admittedly powerful hardware inside the console - one would expect not to see a repeat of the roaring jet engine present in the PS4 Pro.

The look also raises the question of whether the console can lay on its side. The relatively thin design likely means the console is taller than the Xbox Series X, which could make it difficult to fit in some entertainment cabinets - whether vertically or horizontally. However, the existence of that black stand and the console's own curved design seem to put a horizontal orientation out of consideration; this could be a very, very relevant detail for some users. Take a peek at the PS5 hardware reveal trailer below.


When it comes to games, Sony showcased some known quantities from their first-party studios. Horizon: Forbidden West promises to expand on the world, gameplay and concepts seen in the original, amazing Horizon: Zero Dawn (which is hitting the PC scene soon enough, mind you). A new Ratchet and Clank game, under the subtitle Rift Apart, was also showcased. There was some Pixar-quality level of detail there, with the newfound power of the new SSD architecture showcasing nanosecond-level environment transitions, and raytracing being very well-represented in real-time reflections.

Gran Turismo 7 was also showcased, with unprecedented, jaw-dropping levels of detail seen on car models, real-time environment reflections being showcased on the cars' sides and hoods, and beautiful lighting. A new, PS5-exclusive Square Enix game in the form of Project Athia is being developed by Luminous Productions, the same developers of Final Fantasy XV, though not much was shown regarding that one. That's just some of the games, and below, are some of the trailers. Check a complete list of the revealed games after the videos, by order of reveal in the livestream.






Games announced on the PlayStation livestream:
  • Grand Theft Auto 5 ("expanded and enhanced" - Rockstar Games/2K) - 2021
  • Spider-Man: Miles Morales (Insomniac Games) - Holiday 2020
  • Gran Turismo 7 (Polyphony Digital) - TBA
  • Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart (Insomniac Games) - TBA
  • Project Athia (Luminous Productions/Square Enix) - TBA
  • Stray (Bluetwelve/Annapurna Interactive) - 2021
  • Returnal (Housemarque/SIE Worldwide Studios) - TBA
  • Sackboy: A Big Adventure (Sumo Digital) - TBA
  • Destruction Allstars (Lucid) - TBA
  • Kena: Bridge of Spirits (Ember Lab) - TBA
  • Goodbye Volcano High (KO_OP Mode) - 2021
  • Oddworld: Soulstorm (Oddworld Inhabitants) - TBA
  • Ghostwire: Tokyo (Tango Gameworks) - 2021
  • Jett: The Far Shore (Superbrothers & Pine Scented) - Holiday 2020
  • Godfall (Counterplay Games/Gearbox) - Holiday 2020
  • Solar Ash (Heart Machine) - 2021
  • Hitman 3 (IO Interactive) - January 2021
  • Astro's Playroom (Japan Studio/Team Asobi) - TBA
  • Little Devil Inside (Neostream) - TBA
  • NBA 2K21 (2K) - Fall 2020
  • BugSnax (Young Horses) - Holiday 2020
  • Demon's Souls Remake (BluePoint Games/Japan Studio) - TBA
  • Deathloop (Arkane Lyon/Bethesda Softworks) - TBA
  • Resident Evil 8: Village (Capcom) - 2021
  • Pragmata (Capcom) - 2022
  • Horizon: Forbidden West (Guerrilla Games) - TBA
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110 Comments on Sony Showcases Two PlayStation 5 Console Versions, Platform-Exclusive Next Generation Games

#51
Chloe Price
Rahnak
I never bought a used console but I did sell my PS3/games though.
My last console I've got as new was my first PS2 in 2002 :D (this one I have now is my fourth PS2)
Posted on Reply
#52
sepheronx
Valantar
It's more on publishers frankly, they're the ones demanding strict deadlines and forcing developers (most of which are in extremely precarious economic situations unlike a lot of publishers) to release things that ideally would get half a year or a full year more development to fix bugs and polish everything.

Cartridges could indeed be good, but that would be really expensive - let's say they go with a base x2 NVMe controller, and use HMB to make it DRAMless, that's still a significant cost compared to a $60 sales price even for 64GB of flash, let alone the 128GB or more that many games would need. Remember, they couldn't use the bargain-basement flash found in USB drives and low-end SD cards, it simply isn't fast enough.
That's true about first part.

Second part, was similar back in NES days I remember where cartridge was way too expensive. But they found a way to reduce overall costs. They can do it again. Hence the concept of mass production. They just went with CD cause it fit more at the time while being cheaper. They could find a way but they wont cause its expensive for them to do so. Its all about minimal costs. Like lack of originality in components for most part as all use same x86 processor and even GPU just clocked differently and or more CU's (well, playstation has some kind of proprietary function on their AMD cpu but not entirely sure what it is as I didn't read too far into it).

Im like Luther, I am an old duck too and just prefer the old days of consoles vs now. But that is just my opinion.
Posted on Reply
#53
Valantar
sepheronx
That's true about first part.

Second part, was similar back in NES days I remember where cartridge was way too expensive. But they found a way to reduce overall costs. They can do it again. Hence the concept of mass production. They just went with CD cause it fit more at the time while being cheaper. They could find a way but they wont cause its expensive for them to do so. Its all about minimal costs. Like lack of originality in components for most part as all use same x86 processor and even GPU just clocked differently and or more CU's (well, playstation has some kind of proprietary function on their AMD cpu but not entirely sure what it is as I didn't read too far into it).

Im like Luther, I am an old duck too and just prefer the old days of consoles vs now. But that is just my opinion.
There is a lot of wishful thinking in that statement. First off, "they found a way to reduce costs. They could do it again" - did they, though? Carts were always expensive, and disks have always been much cheaper. From what I remember, the biggest cost savings came from using less storage in the carts, which of course constrained development massively (especially for the N64 which was competing with the disk-based PS1). You will always be able to stamp a thin metal film and squeeze it between a few layers of plastic more cheaply than you are able to assemble a non-volatile silicon-based storage medium. That's just reality. I mean, I would love if someone came up with an affordable non-volatile storage medium that performed on par with flash, but... the storage industry spends billions in R&D on that every year (not to mention universities around the world), but flash is the best we've got, and any replacement is likely to be based on some exotic tech and thus very expensive at least to begin with (such as 3D Xpoint). Flash has a cost. A controller has a cost. A PCB has a cost. A casing has a cost. You can't just wish those away, and volume pricing only gets you so far.

As for it all being about minimal costs: have you seen how many game developers go bankrupt every year? How they struggle between projects? How beholden they are to publishers and platform holders? For developers, it's about survival, about still having a job. For publishers, it's (a lot) about profits - but even their margins wouldn't survive a $20 cost hike for physical games without also increasing game prices. And a $20 base cost for a high performance flash-based game cartridge of sufficient capacity is realistic.

And as for "lack of originality in components"? Are there any alternatives you know of? The computing industry has matured and consolidated massively in the past two decades. In the early 2000s a start-up could show up with some new tech and deliver revolutionary features or performance from seemingly nothing. That is not even remotely possible today, simply because things have developed far beyond that point. I guess they could have gone for an ARM-based CPU, but that would mean no backwards compatibility, and besides, ARM scales worse than X86 at high power. For GPUs, you have a handful of vendors making very similar designs with very similar featuresets - a necessity to support the standards put in place to allow for development. And only two vendors make high performance GPUs, and only one of them has a CPU product and is open for semi-custom work.

These aren't the Xbox/PS2 days when a new console could realistically bring with it new and revolutionary features, simply because coming up with new and revolutionary features is increasingly difficult as time goes by. Most vendors deliver the same featuresets, though mobile GPU vendors are a generation or two behind. Nvidia did something like this with RTX, but now AMD seems to have caught up within a single generation - and it's standardized too, through DXR. And while standards do bring conformity, they also bring ease of development, ultimately delivering better games as developers can spend more time making games and less time learning how to use new and weird tools. The PS2 and PS3 were both excellent illustrations of how promising hardware can be undermined by it being difficult to program for (well, the PS3 had a sub-par GPU, but it's CPU was supposed to be revolutionary, but mostly turned out to be terrible to write games for).

This is how technological development will always go. There is a finite amount of possible hardware configurations that will do what is needed, and a finite amount of possible new techniques to achieve this. The majority will be developed early, and as time goes on, development of new tech/features will slow, simply because the list of new possible solutions is both shorter and the things on that list are much more complex. There might come paradigm shift-shift-like developments that kick off a new wave of innovation (replacing silicon in transistors, for example), but we really haven't seen anything like that in computing since its inception. So expecting equally dramatic developments in a mature field of technology (current PCs and consoles) as in an immature one (say, NES and SNES era consoles) is naive and out of touch with reality. It simply isn't going to happen.
Posted on Reply
#55
cueman
console 600$!
joystick150-200$!
games 75-100$

forget kids consoles and come PC world, where you are master andyou deside when you play games.
single game mode agenda!

:peace:
Posted on Reply
#57
sepheronx
No doubt the cost for the cartridges would have been a lot to compete in storage space of the disk. But initially, cost was huge for third party developers simply because of nintendo's horrendous prices on licensing.

As for component base, well its obvious why they went with x86. Its just that now really, the difference is near non existent between the two besides of course exclusives. To which I say that with Xbox its even less of a need to buy cause most of if not all their games will be on PC anyway.

What I was really hoping for was some kind of Silent Hill game since Sony purchased it from Konami. Oh well.
Posted on Reply
#58
rvalencia
sepheronx
That's true about first part.

Second part, was similar back in NES days I remember where cartridge was way too expensive. But they found a way to reduce overall costs. They can do it again. Hence the concept of mass production. They just went with CD cause it fit more at the time while being cheaper. They could find a way but they wont cause its expensive for them to do so. Its all about minimal costs. Like lack of originality in components for most part as all use same x86 processor and even GPU just clocked differently and or more CU's (well, playstation has some kind of proprietary function on their AMD cpu but not entirely sure what it is as I didn't read too far into it).

Im like Luther, I am an old duck too and just prefer the old days of consoles vs now. But that is just my opinion.
Both RTX Turing/Ampere and RDNA 2 include hardware-accelerated raytracing cores for real-time raytracing which are semi-conductor industry's leading-edge designs. A large amount of TFLOPS from RT cores that can be used beyond graphics related raytracing such as audio and physics.

CELL's SPU software raytracing design approach is no match against designs from NVIDIA's RTX and AMD's RDNA 2 RT cores.

For PS5's DSP, AMD easily designed SPU like solution from its existing CU IP which is CU design without graphics hardware.

AMD and NVIDIA are specialized companies for math array technology companies that produce leading-edge GPUs for most price segments.

Intel is evolving into the world's number 3 GPU design house after NVIDIA and AMD.

My point, if there's something unique concept, PC world will assimilate it.
Posted on Reply
#59
ARF
rvalencia
Both RTX Turing/Ampere and RDNA 2 include hardware-accelerated raytracing cores for real-time raytracing which are semi-conductor industry's leading-edge designs. A large amount of TFLOPS from RT cores that can be used beyond graphics related raytracing such as audio and physics.

CELL's SPU software raytracing design approach is no much against designs from NVIDIA's RTX and AMD's RDNA 2 RT cores.

For PS5's DSP, AMD easily designed SPU like solution from its existing CU IP which is CU design without graphics hardware.

Intel is evolving into the world's number 3 GPU design house after NVIDIA and AMD.
Given how poor the sound cards implementation is on the vast majority of mainboards, and users' poor headphones, especially those for gaming, it's kind of bizarre why the Audio is a target for development.

Yes, it should be, but the user base first must move to quality components and then the Audio quality should be considered.
Posted on Reply
#60
Valantar
rvalencia
Both RTX Turing/Ampere and RDNA 2 include hardware-accelerated raytracing cores for real-time raytracing which are semi-conductor industry's leading-edge designs. A large amount of TFLOPS from RT cores that can be used beyond graphics related raytracing such as audio and physics.

CELL's SPU software raytracing design approach is no much against designs from NVIDIA's RTX and AMD's RDNA 2 RT cores.

For PS5's DSP, AMD easily designed SPU like solution from its existing CU IP which is CU design without graphics hardware.

Intel is evolving into the world's number 3 GPU design house after NVIDIA and AMD.
Agree with most of that, except for the last part: what about ARM, Imagination, Qualcomm, Apple? Sure, the third for desktop PC GPUs, but there are plenty of GPU makers out there. It's probably the most contested field in high performance computing still.
ARF
Given how poor the sound cards implementation is on the vast majority of mainboards, and users' poor headphones, especially those for gaming, it's kind of bizarre why the Audio is a target for development.

Yes, it should be, but the user base first must move to quality components and then the Audio quality should be considered.
There's a lot that can still be done even if output quality is poor - directionality/spatiality, adapting audio better to headphones, more dynamic audio (where RT comes in; reflections and other interactions with geometry), etc. If the processing power is there this can all be done even on a potato sound output device with Koss Porta Pros. Will it be good? Of course not. Will it be better than what the same people have today? Obviously. And more importantly, these qualities can have much more of an effect on game immersion and world building than pure audio quality - even if that obviously also matters a lot.
Posted on Reply
#61
rvalencia
Valantar
Agree with most of that, except for the last part: what about ARM, Imagination, Qualcomm, Apple? Sure, the third for desktop PC GPUs, but there are plenty of GPU makers out there. It's probably the most contested field in high performance computing still.
At desktop PC power level, ARM Mali, Imagination PowerVR and Qualcomm Adreno GPUs are inferior to Intel, AMD, NVIDIA.

Qualcomm Adreno GPU design is licensed from AMD in the 1st placed. LOL. Read www.electronicdesign.com/news/article/21754742/qualcomm-licenses-amd-graphics-core-ip

Adreno 6xx IGP has DirectX12 Feature 12_1 while AMD's RDNA 2 and NVIDIA's RTX have DirectX12 Feature 12_2 aka DirectX12 Ultimate.

ARM Mali GPU is a joke i.e. note why Samsung has licensed AMD's RDNA for mobile phones.

www.slashgear.com/samsung-galaxy-phone-with-amd-radeon-gpu-coming-next-year-30618905/
A GFXBench listing for the AMD RDNA architecture that will be used on future Samsung Exynos chips surpasses the current Qualcomm Adreno 650 in many of the synthetic benchmark tests. This Adreno GPU is the one used in the Snapdragon 865 which is already ahead of the race (except against Apple’s A13).

Apple's SoC and GPUs are pointless for 3rd party OEM/ODM vendors

Apple's hardware-accelerated raytracing.... LOL

For pure graphics power for Sony's usage, ARM Mali, Imagination PowerVR, Qualcomm Adreno and Apple A13 IGP solution are inferior AMD's RDNA 2 solution for PS5.

None of ARM Mali, Imagination PowerVR, Qualcomm Adreno 6xx and Apple A13 IGP solution will beat the power of PS4 let alone PS5.
ARF
Given how poor the sound cards implementation is on the vast majority of mainboards, and users' poor headphones, especially those for gaming, it's kind of bizarre why the Audio is a target for development.

Yes, it should be, but the user base first must move to quality components and then the Audio quality should be considered.
For Windows 10 PC platform, DirectX12 Ultimate is important for real-time audio raytracing along with graphics raytracing.
Posted on Reply
#62
theonek
this design is much better than the original leaked one, which looked like an ugly space ship. This design is more clearer and minimalistic....
Posted on Reply
#63
Parn
Pumper
Terrible design and the console is giant compared to the rest:


Based on this trend, the console would soon be the same size as a mid-tower PC. Well they are literally x86 PC with a fancy case and specialised OS anyway, so not surprised.
Posted on Reply
#64
theonek
Parn
Based on this trend, the console would soon be the same size as a mid-tower PC. Well they are literally x86 PC with a fancy case and specialised OS anyway, so not surprised.
well, you can't put powerful hardware ot tight spaces without overheat issues, it has to have a little space and a proper cooling, which demands bigger casing, so don't wonder why consoles are growing bigger...
Posted on Reply
#65
Vayra86
Holy shit. Xbox eat your heart out... this is design, right here. Miles better than the previous version, too.

Damn that looks good... I see not everyone agrees :) But I like it... understated LED that you're not looking straight into, and the philosophy extends to the controller too. That wasn't the case before. It also looks straight up futuristic, could be a movie prop. Seems like a similar design approach to what Samsung does with its latest ultrawides. White with accent, curvy, smooth 'synthetic plating' look.

Also, blue led so it surely runs cooler than competition :pimp:

Bonus points for not looking like a bin, as well.
Posted on Reply
#66
R0H1T
You're complementing the PS or trashing XSX :wtf:
Posted on Reply
#67
Vayra86
R0H1T
You're complementing the PS or trashing XSX :wtf:
XSX was already a trash can, so its not hard :D To each his own though. But I'm a smoker, I might mistake the XSX for my ashtray, not good.

Note I'm just commenting on the design of both, not specs or actual performance. I reckon the XSX might have its heat management in order just a tad better from the way its built.
Posted on Reply
#68
R0H1T
Well tbf it's only one angle, haven't seen a complete rundown of both the latest gens so can't say whether I won't mistake the XSX for a bin either.
Posted on Reply
#69
Vayra86
R0H1T
Well tbf it's only one angle, haven't seen a complete rundown of both the latest gens so can't say whether I won't mistake the XSX for a bin either.
Here you go, 2 seconds on DDG

I'd seriously be able to drop cig butt in there in some half drunk mood

Posted on Reply
#70
Valantar
rvalencia
At desktop PC power level, ARM Mali, Imagination PowerVR and Qualcomm Adreno GPUs are inferior to Intel, AMD, NVIDIA.

Qualcomm Adreno GPU design is licensed from AMD in the 1st placed. LOL. Read www.electronicdesign.com/news/article/21754742/qualcomm-licenses-amd-graphics-core-ip

Adreno 6xx IGP has DirectX12 Feature 12_1 while AMD's RDNA 2 and NVIDIA's RTX have DirectX12 Feature 12_2 aka DirectX12 Ultimate.

ARM Mali GPU is a joke i.e. note why Samsung has licensed AMD's RDNA for mobile phones.

www.slashgear.com/samsung-galaxy-phone-with-amd-radeon-gpu-coming-next-year-30618905/
A GFXBench listing for the AMD RDNA architecture that will be used on future Samsung Exynos chips surpasses the current Qualcomm Adreno 650 in many of the synthetic benchmark tests. This Adreno GPU is the one used in the Snapdragon 865 which is already ahead of the race (except against Apple’s A13).

Apple's SoC and GPUs are pointless for 3rd party OEM/ODM vendors

Apple's hardware-accelerated raytracing.... LOL

For pure graphics power for Sony's usage, ARM Mali, Imagination PowerVR, Qualcomm Adreno and Apple A13 IGP solution are inferior AMD's RDNA 2 solution for PS5.

None of ARM Mali, Imagination PowerVR, Qualcomm Adreno 6xx and Apple A13 IGP solution will beat the power of PS4 let alone PS5.
None of that relates to what I said, nor to your initial statement - they are still "GPU design houses" by any reasonable definition of that term.

Also, nice "hey, you don't know anything" flex with "LOL Adreno is even based on an AMD design" stuff - not only is that common knowledge to anyone interested in GPUs, but it has no bearing on my point. AMD sold the Adreno design to Qualcomm in 2009 after all, and I'm willing to bet quite a lot that there has been significant design work done for those GPUs since then. So even if the basis was AMD (well, actually Imageon, bought by ATI, which was then bought by AMD), Qualcomm is nonetheless a GPU design house.
Vayra86
Holy shit. Xbox eat your heart out... this is design, right here. Miles better than the previous version, too.

Damn that looks good... I see not everyone agrees :) But I like it... understated LED that you're not looking straight into, and the philosophy extends to the controller too. That wasn't the case before. It also looks straight up futuristic, could be a movie prop. Seems like a similar design approach to what Samsung does with its latest ultrawides. White with accent, curvy, smooth 'synthetic plating' look.

Also, blue led so it surely runs cooler than competition :pimp:

Bonus points for not looking like a bin, as well.
"Looking like a movie prop", especially when said movie is likely to be a low-budget B-rate pulp sci-fi job, is not that great a compliment. Most people don't want tacky "hey look ma, I drew a spaceship" designs in their living rooms. This looks cheap, tacky, and woefully poorly thought through. Combined with the (massive!) size (see previous post in this thread), this is going to be a problem for a lot of people.
Posted on Reply
#71
Vayra86
Valantar
"Looking like a movie prop", especially when said movie is likely to be a low-budget B-rate pulp sci-fi job, is not that great a compliment. Most people don't want tacky "hey look ma, I drew a spaceship" designs in their living rooms. This looks cheap, tacky, and woefully poorly thought through. Combined with the (massive!) size (see previous post in this thread), this is going to be a problem for a lot of people.
Here's the sort of design in my mind when I saw that PS ;) Wink wink

Do agree though, XSX is much easier to fit in any living room and not look like that sore thumb.
But for teenage bedroom with fancy lights? This fits right in. Yep you got me... I like those fancy lights too, to some degree :P

Posted on Reply
#72
R0H1T
Valantar
I drew a spaceship" designs in their living rooms.
Hey speak for yourself, I literally drew spaceships for a couple of years in middle(?) school using the shuttle images on our notebooks (the writing variety) & all up to scale with precision instruments of the time :pimp:

Space was & still is a topic close to heart, ever so often I kill time on YT with PBS spacetime videos.
Posted on Reply
#73
Spencer LeBlanc
Not a fan of the design. I can't tell but it looks like cheap plastic.
Hopefully it will not be plastic housing...
Posted on Reply
#74
Valantar
R0H1T
Hey speak about yourself, I literally drew spaceships for fun for a couple of years in middle(?) school using the shuttle images on our notebooks (the writing variety) & all up to scale with precision instruments of the time :pimp:

Space was & still is a topic close to heart, ever so often I kill time on YT with PBS spacetime videos.
Yes, but as an adult, have you built models based on those drawings and featured them prominently in your living room? I didn't think so ;)
Vayra86
Here's the sort of design in my mind when I saw that PS ;) Wink wink

Do agree though, XSX is much easier to fit in any living room and not look like that sore thumb.
But for teenage bedroom with fancy lights? This fits right in. Yep you got me... I like those fancy lights too, to some degree :p


I guess if you meld that with this, you do indeed have something looking like the PS5 :D

I can absolutely enjoy some over the top designs, but this just goes way beyond that and plants both feet + its ass directly in a heaping pile of "tacky". The design style is squarely mid-2000s, the shiny white plastic will look poor in real life compared to renders, the flowy shape will stand out next to anything and thus just emphasize the size of this thing, and the blue LED just screams "hey, I'm 13 years old!" There are many possible points on the axis between "bland and boring" and "over-the-top tacky", yet this seems to have aimed squarely for the latter pole. I don't think the XSX is the best design ever either, but at least it has some subtlety to it.
Spencer LeBlanc
Not a fan of the design. I can't tell but it looks like cheap plastic.
Hopefully it will not be plastic housing...
All consoles have plastic housings. Anything else is far too expensive. Plastic shell, steel inner cage to ensure rigidity and RF compliance.
Posted on Reply
#75
R0H1T
Valantar
Yes, but as an adult, have you built models based on those drawings and featured them prominently in your living room? I didn't think so ;)
Yeah unfortunately I haven't set the room up, though generally speaking I prefer clean & spacious environments. Nearly everything that isn't used daily is crammed in an attic or any other storage space. I definitely am not pro flashy items anywhere I have control over, personal space is a bit different. Just to clarify ~ I don't find the PS5 flashy, at least from the image I see here.
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