Tuesday, June 16th 2020

MSI Confirms Ryzen XT "Matisse Refresh" Clock Speeds

MSI confirmed the clock speeds of the upcoming Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT, and Ryzen 5 3600XT processors on its website. The CPU support tab in the product page of the MAG B550 Tomahawk motherboard lists out clock speeds of the three processors. The nominal clock speeds of the 3900XT, 3800XT, and 3600XT are identical to those of the 3900X, 3800X, and 3600X, respectively, as are their TDP ratings. What the table doesn't list are boost clocks. AMD has reportedly increased the max boost frequencies of the three new chips by 100-200 MHz over those of the 3600X, 3800X, and 3900X. The 3900XT and 3800XT reportedly feature 4.70 GHz boost clocks, while the 3600XT ticks as fast as 4.50 GHz. As for prices, the 3900XT is expected to launch at $499 (launch MSRP of 3900X), the 3800XT at $399 (launch MSRP of 3800X), and the 3600XT at $249 (launch MSRP of the 3600X). The 3900XT and 3800XT ship without coolers, just like the 3950X.
Source: VideoCardz
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18 Comments on MSI Confirms Ryzen XT "Matisse Refresh" Clock Speeds

#1
JAB Creations
I'd really like to see the base frequencies increase, I've never actually seen any of the boost clocks though I have a both single and multi-threaded work loads to test with. Suggestions please?
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#2
RH92
JAB Creations
I'd really like to see the base frequencies increase, I've never actually seen any of the boost clocks though I have a both single and multi-threaded work loads to test with. Suggestions please?
Meh , base frequencies are decent for the workload they are supposed to tackle . What I would like to see is all cores hitting boost clock from the getgo .
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#3
JAB Creations
RH92
You are looking at base frequencies on this MSI chart .
No, I'm aware of that hence...
JAB Creations
I'd really like to see the base frequencies increase, ...
I'm talking about seeing my 3800X hitting the boost clocks in a utility while testing my system out. To me the base clocks are the most important because they are guaranteed - as in if you set your computer to high performance mode it will stay at those clocks.
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#4
RH92
JAB Creations
No, I'm aware of that hence...
Yep my bad , never mind i corrected my post .
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#5
droopyRO
The 3600XT looks like a nice little upgrade for gaming from my 2700X. Any ideea when they will come out, is it 7th of July ?
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#6
JAB Creations
droopyRO
The 3600XT looks like a nice little upgrade for gaming from my 2700X. Any idea when they will come out, is it 7th of July ?
That is what I have read though I don't know if that means they'll also go on sale in Romania on the same day? Do you guys have to deal with delays there or is it just our Aussie friends? Also, unless you're running a relatively older board why not just wait for the 4000 series? It'll be coming out - I think I read in September. Ignore the clickbait saying January 2021 on 5nm.
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#7
Oberon
JAB Creations
I'd really like to see the base frequencies increase, I've never actually seen any of the boost clocks though I have a both single and multi-threaded work loads to test with. Suggestions please?
Ryzen 3000 processors basically never drop all the way down to their base frequencies (even the 3950X is able to easily maintain several hundred MHz above its base frequency under all-core loads with reasonable cooling), so that wouldn't help anything at all.
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#8
Bee9
JAB Creations
I'd really like to see the base frequencies increase, I've never actually seen any of the boost clocks though I have a both single and multi-threaded work loads to test with. Suggestions please?
Better cooler, better vrm on the board and a nice overclock without strict power limit... my 3900x easily hit 4.3 ghz all cores after some tinkering with the voltages.
It settled at 1.25v and around 65C. I think I got lucky because most people will have to run with 1.35v to hit 4.3ghz.
I’ve never seen my 3900x runs at base frequency. It either boosts up to 4.7 ghz on single threaded task briefly or hoover around 4.18 ghz in most cases.

With the XT, better binning will allow faster frequency but silicon lottery is still at play here. Some chips will exceed the thermal envelope of the stock coolers in some countries with higher ambient temperature, so it’s safer to not include one.
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#9
Metroid
Bee9
Better cooler, better vrm on the board and a nice overclock without strict power limit... my 3900x easily hit 4.3 ghz all cores after some tinkering with the voltages.
It settled at 1.25v and around 65C. I think I got lucky because most people will have to run with 1.35v to hit 4.3ghz.
I’ve never seen my 3900x runs at base frequency. It either boosts up to 4.7 ghz on single threaded task briefly or hoover around 4.18 ghz in most cases.

With the XT, better binning will allow faster frequency but silicon lottery is still at play here. Some chips will exceed the thermal envelope of the stock coolers in some countries with higher ambient temperature, so it’s safer to not include one.
Yeah, you got lucky if you bought it last year at launch week, if it wasn't launch week then no. I see no reason buying any of these because 4xxx is just around the corner, even if around the corner means 6 months.
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#10
Bee9
Metroid
Yeah, you got lucky if you bought it last year at launch week, if it wasn't launch week then no. I see no reason buying any of these because 4xxx is just around the corner, even if around the corner means 6 months.
Yeah I bought it from launch week. All later chips in 2020 have been consistently better.
4xxx is not around the corner. It will be in 2021 at least with the data I have on hands.
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#11
droopyRO
JAB Creations
That is what I have read though I don't know if that means they'll also go on sale in Romania on the same day? Do you guys have to deal with delays there or is it just our Aussie friends? Also, unless you're running a relatively older board why not just wait for the 4000 series? It'll be coming out - I think I read in September. Ignore the clickbait saying January 2021 on 5nm.
It depends on the importer, but we usually get them with the rest of the world on launch day. I would love a Ryzen 4600, but those rumors might be true same as an impending economic crisis around the world.
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#12
EarthDog
JAB Creations
I'd really like to see the base frequencies increase, I've never actually seen any of the boost clocks though I have a both single and multi-threaded work loads to test with. Suggestions please?
Best for a different thread...but a quick answer...

...make sure your bios is updated to the latest version first off... temps OK? Etc.
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#13
efikkan
droopyRO
The 3600XT looks like a nice little upgrade for gaming from my 2700X. Any ideea when they will come out, is it 7th of July ?
Like so many Ryzen 1000/2000 owners, you're already looking to upgrade to something just a little better, those CPUs haven't "aged" well, compared to boring "old" Skylake.

3600XT will certainly help your gaming performance a little bit. But I always recommend upgrading when the performance uplift is significant enough, unless the old computer is broken or unstable of course.
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#14
ymbaja
efikkan
Like so many Ryzen 1000/2000 owners, you're already looking to upgrade to something just a little better, those CPUs haven't "aged" well, compared to boring "old" Skylake.
I would argue the opposite. It’s not that Ryzen haven’t aged well, it’s that there have been such substantial gains with each new generation. That hasn’t really been the case on the intel side hence nothing to upgrade to.
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#15
EarthDog
IMO, the big gains came from Ryzen 1000 to Ryzen 2000... 2000 to 3000 isn't as significant. I surely wouldn't upgrade from 2000 series to 3000 series unless I need the cores and threads.
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#16
Oberon
EarthDog
IMO, the big gains came from Ryzen 1000 to Ryzen 2000... 2000 to 3000 isn't as significant. I surely wouldn't upgrade from 2000 series to 3000 series unless I need the cores and threads.
Zen to Zen+ was not that large a jump; it was very much a refresh with no real architectural changes. Zen 2 is, by all accounts, a much larger jump in all metrics, price points, and markets. This "mid"-cycle refresh is even smaller than Zen to Zen+, though. There's room for AMD to make it worthwhile if these parts will realistically maintain higher boost clocks under lightly threaded workloads (read: gaming), but it's going to be a hard sell given the price reductions we've already seen. Even given the best case scenario for these parts, they don't make sense as an upgrade path for anyone currently on Zen 2.
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#17
EarthDog
Oye.... my fault.. that's absolutely correct. The big jump was 2000 series to 3000 series (Zen+ to Zen 2). That said, I still don't think it's really worth it unless you need additional cores and threads.........though I've upgraded intentionally for smaller gains, lol!
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#18
efikkan
ymbaja
I would argue the opposite. It’s not that Ryzen haven’t aged well, it’s that there have been such substantial gains with each new generation. That hasn’t really been the case on the intel side hence nothing to upgrade to.
By that logic, Bulldozer would be a fantastic investment due to the exciting upgrade potential. :eek:

You missed the point;
You have to remember that back in the days when Ryzen 1000 and 2000 were fresh, their competitor were Coffee Lake models like i5-8600K and i7-8700K. The argument back then was that you could get 8 cores from AMD or 6 cores from Intel for a comparable price, but that AMD was more "future proof". Then 1-2 years later, many felt the need to upgrade to Ryzen 3000 (Zen 2) to get higher performance per core, performance which was available from Intel all along.

While there is some performance difference between Zen(1) and Zen 2, I would agree with EarthDog, that the reason to upgrade now would be the need for more cores, otherwise wait for the next gen from either party.
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