Thursday, July 30th 2020

Intel Overhauls its Corporate Identity, Registers New Product Logos, "EVO Powered by Core" Surfaces

EVO is likely to become a prominent client-segment processor brand by Intel as it wades into the post-Core product generation. Intel just registered a large tranche of trademarks and logos with the USPTO. It begins with a re-design of Intel's corporate identity from the ground-up, including the company's main logo. A clean new typeface replaces the one Intel has been using since the original Core i7 from a decade ago. The brands are placed with simple geometric backgrounds with fewer color gradients. The brand extension (i3/i5/i7/i9) is located at the bottom-right corner.

The distinction between two logos, "EVO Powered by Core" and just Core i3, caught our eye. We speculate that EVO could refer to a new category of Hybrid processors (chips with more than one kind of CPU core), and could debut with "Alder Lake." The non-EVO chips could have only one kind of CPU core, and given the timing of this trademark application (July 2020), we expect it to debut only with the processor that succeeds "Tiger Lake," as notebooks based on the new chips may already be under mass-production. In any case, it's only a matter of the notebook ODM (eg: Quanta, Compal, Foxconn, etc.,) placing a sticker on the product or its packaging. It's also interesting to note the "powered by Core" subtext in the EVO branding. Intel could be using this to transition between the two brands.
Intel New Logo Evo Powered By Core Intel Inside New Logo
Update 20:02 UTC: Added registration data from US Patent Office:

Sources: momomo_us (Twitter), Core i3 logo (Justia Trademarks), EVO Powered by Core logo (Justia Trademarks)
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48 Comments on Intel Overhauls its Corporate Identity, Registers New Product Logos, "EVO Powered by Core" Surfaces

#2
john_
Flat logos for flat technological evolution.
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#3
Matthew Linke
I like what looks to be a lookalike on the lower right to AMD box of just a number.
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#4
Chrispy_
Incoming lawsuits from Samsung and Mitsubishi in 3... 2... 1...
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#5
thesmokingman
The company is imploding and this is what they do?
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#6
Assimilator
Using the word "Evo" when Samsung's already used it for years on their SSDs... smart move Intel marketing...
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#7
dragontamer5788
thesmokingman
The company is imploding and this is what they do?
Intel has a hundred thousand employees. Surely they can do more than one thing at a time.
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#8
thesmokingman
dragontamer5788
Intel has a hundred thousand employees. Surely they can do more than one thing at a time.
That's why they be imploding.
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#9
dyonoctis
thesmokingman
The company is imploding and this is what they do?
In Intel case, a new visual Identity can symbolize a "break" from the statut quo that where plaguing them. It's all about brand perception. Weither or not their new product will support that change is something that we'll see in a few months.

It's a bit nostalgic, the new font is similar to the one that hey tused before the core/pentium D era. I just don't know if that slight reminiscence to the pentium 4 sticker is really a good thing :






Although it seems like it was used for some pentium III as well :

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#10
halcyon
When your manufacturing and technology fails, put all your eggs in the marketing basket.

That's how downfalls begin.

Just learn from IBM.
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#11
AnarchoPrimitiv
Marketing 101: When you have an inferior product in a market lacking rapid expansion, change the name.
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#12
HwGeek
At least they haven't used "Turbo" :-).
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#13
Chrispy_
When Intel began to trip up about three years ago I said that Intel had enough money for a decade of continual screwups without failing as a company.

Now that I look back on things, Intel's first 10nm issues surfaced July 2015. The fact that it's still a problem five years later means that they've been screwing up CONTINUOUSLY for 4+ years.

I think I underestimated how frickin' stubborn and tech-illiterate Intel's board is. I'd like to revise that 'decade' comment to five years, starting three years ago when it was really clear that their 10nm wasn't going to work, and their 14nm was suffering the beginning of what has turned out to be 3 years of supply shortages.
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#14
Totally
For once Samsung can actually take issue with another company instead of the other way around. Do they have the audacity to actually do so?
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#15
dragontamer5788
Chrispy_
When Intel began to trip up about three years ago I said that Intel had enough money for a decade of continual screwups without failing as a company.

Now that I look back on things, Intel's first 10nm issues surfaced July 2015. The fact that it's still a problem five years later means that they've been screwing up CONTINUOUSLY for 4+ years.

I think I underestimated how frickin' stubborn and tech-illiterate Intel's board is. I'd like to revise that 'decade' comment to five years, starting three years ago when it was really clear that their 10nm wasn't going to work, and their 14nm was suffering the beginning of what has turned out to be 3 years of supply shortages.
Intel has $82 Billion in shareholder equity, of which $8 Billion is in cold, hard cash. $44 Billion in "current assets" and only ~$22 Billion in liabilities. Intel today could spend $20 Billion on one moonshot project and still have money left over to continue their operations.

In the short term, it is clear that Intel is screwing up their process. But a giant pile of $20 Billion+ can turn things around, as long as the board + executives do the right thing with it. Based on other companies (IBM, Sears, etc. etc.) that have entered long periods of decline... Intel could easily remain giant for a decade to come, coasting entirely on its cash pile alone. And who knows? Maybe Intel really can turn things around and return to dominance.
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#16
chodaboy19
Never count intel out, they have been through tough time like these before and always came back stronger. It's easy to beat someone when they are down and who doesn't cheer for the underdog anyway!
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#17
theoneandonlymrk
chodaboy19
Never count intel out, they have been through tough time like these before and always came back stronger. It's easy to beat someone when they are down and who doesn't cheer for the underdog anyway!
Be a few years at least before they're the underdog, and that will take some fine screwups.
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#18
mtcn77
Chrispy_
Now that I look back on things, Intel's first 10nm issues surfaced July 2015.
If you know this gentleman, you would know issues had sprung back in 2012.
I suggest watching all three parts before judging.
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#19
OneMoar
There is Always Moar
twack
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#20
Object55
I like how they use "EVO" although there hasn't been a single instance of Evolution in the past decade lol. Fix your damn design and then call it an EVO. FFS
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#21
Mayclore
Something something deck chairs, something something Titanic...
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#22
theoneandonlymrk
mtcn77
If you know this gentleman, you would know issues had sprung back in 2012.
I suggest watching all three parts before judging.

Intel have also had the unfortunate security issues.
People forget they were in the technology, something that they worked to evolve from on a five to ten year cadence , things like prefetch , precompute and various memory technology that they would have worked to evolve either needed massive rework or a lot of mitigative circuits, ASICS take a lot of effort to change in short time spans so does r and d effort.
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#23
mtcn77
theoneandonlymrk
Intel have also had the unfortunate security issues.
People forget they were in the technology, something that they worked to evolve from on a five to ten year cadence , things like prefetch , precompute and various memory technology that they would have worked to evolve either needed massive rework or a lot of mitigative circuits, ASICS take a lot of effort to change in short time spans so does r and d effort.
That had the added misfortune after the fact. I still think the lecture is pure gold.
What I sense in Intel is an air of internship which should have been shrugged off in a corporation of this seismic proportions. They must be up to something...
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#24
dragontamer5788
mtcn77
That had the added misfortune after the fact. I still think the lecture is pure gold.
What I sense in Intel is an air of internship which should have been shrugged off in a corporation of this seismic proportions. They must be up to something...
EMIB shows promise as a superior "chiplet" methodology compared to the passive, or active, interconnect that AMD is currently using. The EMIB bridge between a Xeon + Alteria FPGA is a major demonstration of its practicality.

They're definitely onto something. But Intel CPUs don't really have anything fashionable to connect to yet. Xeon + FPGA is too niche. The GPU project is key: it needs to be useful enough that people actually care when it comes out. Intel probably should split its cores into AMD-style chiplets for better yields, and use their EMIB technology to connect them together into bigger arrays that no one else can do. I dunno how many years Intel is away from doing this (or even if they're attempting to build something like this).
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#25
mtcn77
dragontamer5788
EMIB shows promise as a superior "chiplet" methodology compared to the passive, or active, interconnect that AMD is currently using. The EMIB bridge between a Xeon + Alteria FPGA is a major demonstration of its practicality.

They're definitely onto something. But Intel CPUs don't really have anything fashionable to connect to yet. Xeon + FPGA is too niche. The GPU project is key: it needs to be useful enough that people actually care when it comes out.
Yeah, let's have high hopes they won't leave it to the interns this time. I cannot stomach another pet project.
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