Friday, August 7th 2020

Apple Says Cloud Gaming Services Like Google Stadia and Microsoft xCloud Violate App Store Guidelines

Cloud gaming is the next step in mobile gaming, with services like Microsoft project xCloud aiming to bring AAA titles right to your mobile phone. Microsoft has already been testing its xCloud application on Android and iOS devices for some time, and the application was supposed to launch sometime in September. However, it seems like Microsoft is only going to serve the customers on Android, as Apple says that these types of applications violate App Store guidelines. This doesn't only apply to xCloud, but also Google's Stadia gaming platform. When developer uploads application to App Store for iOS, the application goes through a review by Apple, for security reason and for Apple to check if it meets its guidelines.

Being that xCloud and Stadia are types of applications which offer a way to access many more applications (games in this case), this is against Apple's policy as they can't control the applications these services offer.
Here is the official statement from Apple regarding the situation:
Apple
The App Store was created to be a safe and trusted place for customers to discover and download apps, and a great business opportunity for all developers. Before they go on our store, all apps are reviewed against the same set of guidelines that are intended to protect customers and provide a fair and level playing field to developers.

Our customers enjoy great apps and games from millions of developers, and gaming services can absolutely launch on the App Store as long as they follow the same set of guidelines applicable to all developers, including submitting games individually for review, and appearing in charts and search. In addition to the App Store, developers can choose to reach all iPhone and iPad users over the web through Safari and other browsers on the App Store.
Microsoft's response follows:
Microsoft
Our testing period for the Project xCloud preview app for iOS has expired. Unfortunately, we do not have a path to bring our vision of cloud gaming with Xbox Game Pass Ultimate to gamers on iOS via the Apple App Store. Apple stands alone as the only general purpose platform to deny consumers from cloud gaming and game subscription services like Xbox Game Pass. And it consistently treats gaming apps differently, applying more lenient rules to non-gaming apps even when they include interactive content. All games available in the Xbox Game Pass catalog are rated for content by independent industry ratings bodies such as the ESRB and regional equivalents. We are committed to finding a path to bring cloud gaming with Xbox Game Pass Ultimate to the iOS platform. We believe that the customer should be at the heart of the gaming experience and gamers tell us they want to play, connect and share anywhere, no matter where they are. We agree.
You can draw your own conclusions from here.
Source: The Verge
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31 Comments on Apple Says Cloud Gaming Services Like Google Stadia and Microsoft xCloud Violate App Store Guidelines

#1
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
Basically stadia and xcloud are like VPNs that can be used to tunnel out of Apple's walled garden like Steve McQueen in the movie 'The Great Escape' so they gotta keep control of their no fun zone and say no to cloud gaming
Posted on Reply
#2
dyonoctis
So basically Apple is saying : "we want to control your service." this low-key censoring, Apple doesn't validate the shit that people are looking at on YouTube, Facebook, twitter etc.…and those guys are having a hard time to curate all the bullshit happening on their platform.

Meanwhile game services have a much more robust system when it comes to curation. The only difference is that the content is interactive. But streaming a game isn't going to break your device.

I wonder if mobile game developpers are really going to consider unfair that games from xcloud, geforce now don't have to be validated by apple... those games are evolving in two whole different universe.
Posted on Reply
#3
blobster21
Apple's knee-jerk reaction !
I'm on android so i don't care in the slightest :nutkick:
Posted on Reply
#4
Vya Domus
Apple simply likes to prohibit services from their platform that they may delve into at some point.
Posted on Reply
#5
demian_vi
FreedomEclipse
Basically stadia and xcloud are like VPNs that can be used to tunnel out of Apple's walled garden like Steve McQueen in the movie 'The Great Escape' so they gotta keep control of their no fun zone and say no to cloud gaming
they are more like enterpise mobility products allowing access to virtualized apps, like dozens of existing apps in apple store already do. apple doesn't offer such an app and would never be considered for business use if they blocked these, while they do offer arcade which pales before xcloud
Posted on Reply
#6
stoff75
I'm confused. Isn't Roblox another app with content (games) inside of it that they don't directly control or curate?
Posted on Reply
#7
ebivan
So Apple says they wanna get 30% of every purchase you make in game streaming services, like they have become used to... Greed is the most constant Apple has retained over the years.

Well, lets just see how customers react if cloud gaming will become an Android exclusive feature :)
Posted on Reply
#8
Caring1
Control freaks, let it go Apple.
Posted on Reply
#9
AnarchoPrimitiv
FreedomEclipse
Basically stadia and xcloud are like VPNs that can be used to tunnel out of Apple's walled garden like Steve McQueen in the movie 'The Great Escape' so they gotta keep control of their no fun zone and say no to cloud gaming
Personally, I'd love to see an App use a motorcycle to jump a barbed wire fence like that...

I just think Apple is keeping the competition clear because they're eventually going to get into the same market (perhaps this is anti-competitive to the point of being a violation, but I don't know). Apple so desperately wants to be a services company, so it makes sense.
Posted on Reply
#10
theoneandonlymrk
The bit that ffs me off is they let these apps on initially.

They had one use case from the off and now it's against their policy.

How's about they get some consistency going.

Another fine example of why I never will join their cult.
Posted on Reply
#11
DeathtoGnomes
I have to agree with Apple on this one. The potential security holes in the app itself, the ability of track users, anything that could lead to the exploiting personal information all can be avoided if the app stayed out of the app store. We all know how great m$ is with security, Apple being Apple will not look twice at the app once its in the store, they have a habit of ignoring complaints about an app.
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#12
Steevo
Apple, no gaming for you once we get ARM chips back in.
Posted on Reply
#13
bug
One more reason to congratulate myself for an iDevice free home :toast:
Posted on Reply
#14
Rahnak
Just Apple being Apple and keeping their total control over iOS. And they probably have bigger plans regarding gaming than Apple Arcade. They already made the mistake of allowing video streaming services "in" and gaming is growing to be a more lucrative market.
DeathtoGnomes
We all know how great m$ is with security
Just as great as Apple is, if not better, given that they've always been a much bigger target.
Posted on Reply
#15
Totally
dyonoctis
So basically Apple is saying : "we want to control your service." this low-key censoring, Apple doesn't validate the shit that people are looking at on YouTube, Facebook, twitter etc.…and those guys are having a hard time to curate all the bullshit happening on their platform.

Meanwhile game services have a much more robust system when it comes to curation. The only difference is that the content is interactive. But streaming a game isn't going to break your device.

I wonder if mobile game developpers are really going to consider unfair that games from xcloud, geforce now don't have to be validated by apple... those games are evolving in two whole different universe.
It's actually since the services bypass Apple servers, Apple can't charge or demand a large cut thus violates ToS. I bet my left nut if money was coming their way Cook & Co. would be like " Does this violate ToS? nahhhhhh..."
Posted on Reply
#16
Octavean
Who here is surprised by this,...?

Yeah, that is what I thought, no one,.....
Posted on Reply
#17
Chloe Price
Apple's policy is light years ahead of Android's when there is literal malware available on Play Store since you can upload and sell almost any crap disguised as an app/game.
Posted on Reply
#18
Grigor
antitrust hearings are needed
Posted on Reply
#19
ebivan
Guys dont you realize it has nothing to do with trust, privacy or security!
Apple just doesnt want to miss out on their 30% for every f-ing piece of content people consume on their already overpriced hardware!
Posted on Reply
#20
BrainCruser
The solution is simple. Developers should abandon iOS. We should just let it rot.
Posted on Reply
#21
Assimilator
theoneandonlymrk
The bit that ffs me off is they let these apps on initially.

They had one use case from the off and now it's against their policy.
That's how Apple works, you see.

Let the app on, let it build up a decent user base, then slap the 30% or whatever ludicrous fee on it. Then the devs have to decide which way they want to lose income: by walking away from Apple's walled garden, or paying the 30% to Apple.

Microsoft and Google are in the situation where they can tell Apple to get fucked with its demands for protection money, but most devs aren't so lucky.

Apple is cancer and its walled garden is cancer. Don't let any of the good shit it pulls with privacy and whatnot distract you: Apple only does what is good for Apple's bottom line.
Posted on Reply
#24
willgart
funny
teamviewer, remote desktop and other remote access apps are authorized in the Apple store...
and through them, the users can access any content, even the ones not under the Apple control...
what about radio apps? netflix? youtube?
or just the internet browser, where you can see any content, and play web based games...

mmm...
I'm lost
if I follow Apple, all of these apps should be removed from the Apple store.

or.... Apple just want their 30% of profit?
if its the case, they just have to say it. "give us 30% of your profit"
Posted on Reply
#25
Totally
willgart
mmm...
I'm lost
if I follow Apple, all of these apps should be removed from the Apple store.

or.... Apple just want their 30% of profit?
if its the case, they just have to say it. "give us 30% of your profit"
They probably already did but MS/Goog most like said no, and thus we're here no pay, no play.
Posted on Reply
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