Tuesday, August 11th 2020

Thermaltake Intros TG-30 and TG-50 Thermal Compounds with Honeycomb Pattern Stencil Applicators

Thermaltake today rolled out the TG-30 and TG-50 thermal interface materials. Both appear to be silver particle-based viscous compounds, although the company did not put out their composition. Both the TG-30 and TG-50 come in 4 g syringes. The TG-30 offers thermal conductivity of 4.5 W/m-k, while the TG-50 offers 8 W/m-k.

A unique selling point with the two is the inclusion of a honeycomb pattern stencil and a tiny spatula, which lets you apply the paste onto your CPU IHS in a neat honeycomb pattern for a Thermaltake-recommended Z-height of the application, and uniform spread under pressure from the cooling solution. Thermaltake also includes two alcohol rubs for clearing out its compound from the IHS and cooler. The company didn't reveal pricing of the two.
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29 Comments on Thermaltake Intros TG-30 and TG-50 Thermal Compounds with Honeycomb Pattern Stencil Applicators

#1
Baum
3D print your own or just cut a credit card to sqaure size, use another one to scrub over it to create an even height of paste
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#2
ZoneDymo
what kinda of stupid crap is that...yeah lets just waste thermalpaste to get some design application that we then squash and cover with a cooler...
are they actually going to claim this improves thermals? and believe others will believe that?

honestly if this sells to even 1 person in the world....jeez
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#3
dj-electric
Nobody asked for this.
This is a very wasteful product - both of money and of thermal paste.
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#4
watzupken
I feel they are trying too hard to differentiate themselves from the others selling thermal compounds as well. I honestly don't see the point of the honey comb applicator.
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#5
laszlo
actually the honeycomb applicator will be good for beginners to avoid putting too much tim; if this tim has silver particles even is not conductive may be capacitive and can cause damage if close electric paths
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#6
Caring1
Hopefully it's not a diamond powder base like their TG7
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#7
Vya Domus
This has gone too far I think.
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#8
Verpal
laszlo
actually the honeycomb applicator will be good for beginners to avoid putting too much tim; if this tim has silver particles even is not conductive may be capacitive and can cause damage if close electric paths
Beginner should never use conductive compound.
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#9
Dammeron
laszlo
actually the honeycomb applicator will be good for beginners to avoid putting too much tim; if this tim has silver particles even is not conductive may be capacitive and can cause damage if close electric paths
Problem is that by using it You're putting too much tim. Check, how thick this thing is. The layer should be as thin, as possible, only to fill the microscopic gaps between IHS and cooler base.
Posted on Reply
#10
laszlo
Dammeron
Problem is that by using it You're putting too much tim. Check, how thick this thing is. The layer should be as thin, as possible, only to fill the microscopic gaps between IHS and cooler base.
i know but usually you will have microscopic gaps if you make the cpu and hs base flat yourself(my own experience) ;stock ones sometimes comes in different shapes as i noticed with razor test -convex/concave(cpu) and bad milling hs; maybe they had this in mind by making it so thick? idea is good anyway maybe they'll improve it..
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#11
Chrispy_
For consumer-sized IHS just drop a small pea in the middle of the CPU and call it a day.

Hundreds of tests and videos exist to prove that this method works great and I've removed maybe 10,000 heatsinks in my lifetime and in almost every single one of them the paste was squeezed into a thin, even layer across the whole contact surface and oozed out over the edges.

In short, it doesn't really matter where you apply the paste as long as you put enough where it needs to be. For Zen2 I actually put a smaller pea in the middle of each chipset, so two for a 3800X or lower, and three for a 3900X or above. I have no doubt that a single blob in the middle of the IHS would perform identically after a day or so, once the heatsink has had time to squeeze the excess goop out to the edges anyway.
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#12
Dave65
ZoneDymo
what kinda of stupid crap is that...yeah lets just waste thermalpaste to get some design application that we then squash and cover with a cooler...
are they actually going to claim this improves thermals? and believe others will believe that?

honestly if this sells to even 1 person in the world....jeez
^THIS^
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#13
Mayclore
I'd trust Cooler Master's flat nozzle thermal paste syringes over this.

And they waste less TIM.
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#14
Tomorrow
laszlo
actually the honeycomb applicator will be good for beginners to avoid putting too much tim; if this tim has silver particles even is not conductive may be capacitive and can cause damage if close electric paths
Not just beginners. Im man enough to admit that i always seem to make a mess when it comes to applying TIM. Like a little child lol.
Something like this but maybe just to protect the sides would be the best. I should make one from credit card myself...
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#15
bonehead123
Chrispy_
For consumer-sized IHS just drop a small pea in the middle of the CPU and call it a day.

Hundreds of tests and videos exist to prove that this method works great and I've removed maybe 10,000 heatsinks in my lifetime and in almost every single one of them the paste was squeezed into a thin, even layer across the whole contact surface and oozed out over the edges.
^^THIS^^

and my usages brings this total to 11,000 hehehehe :D
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#16
watzupken
laszlo
actually the honeycomb applicator will be good for beginners to avoid putting too much tim; if this tim has silver particles even is not conductive may be capacitive and can cause damage if close electric paths
I have serious doubts that the honey comb applicator will help beginners. It does nothing to stop people from squeezing too much thermal compound in my opinion. Beginners just need clear instructions on what they need to do, and what not to do.
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#17
Octavean
If you want to trigger a large swath of people in PC forums just tell or show them an alternative method for applying thermal interface material,.....then sit back and watch the insanity ensue,....

Look, obviously this isn't for those that know what they are doing when assembling a computer. If it helps those that need a little help with this process then I don't see the harm. If a little kid were riding a bike down the sidewalk you wouldn't yell at them and say that's not how you ride a bike then snatch the training wheels off,.....this is no different.

As long as it doesn't break anything then its not a big deal.

If Thermaltake really wanted to be innovative here they probably could have come up with an application design that would apply microdots of TIM on the heat spreader in one shot (depending on the size of the heat spreader). That would have been slightly more impressive but still just as unnecessary.
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#18
Chloe Price
This would've been great as an April Fool's joke.

Seriously, the most useless product of the year? I've always just put a sane amount of paste to a CPU/GPU/chipset die and that's it.
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#19
XiGMAKiD
If it comes with heart stencil and pink thermal paste I might consider buying one :love: just for shit and giggles
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#20
mtcn77
Dammeron
Problem is that by using it You're putting too much tim. Check, how thick this thing is. The layer should be as thin, as possible, only to fill the microscopic gaps between IHS and cooler base.
That is for nonevaporative tims, not these. You are supposed to give up some performance in the name of "anti-caking agent".
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#22
Turmania
I see what they are doing, now they will sue all thermalpaste products that come up with an applicator, because let us be honest, this is what this specific company does....
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#23
ryun
I really like the stencil idea but the implementation could use some improvements in regards to waste. I'm not totally sold on the pattern because it does seem like quite a bit more than I'd ever apply, but hopefully Thermaltake has done their research here. At least it ensures that you're applying a reproducible application each time. But that brings me to my other complaint: you're probably only going to get one good use out of that stencil since it relies on adhesive. It'd be better if they produced something reusable.
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#24
bonehead123
Pea drop in the center....

'nuff said :)

If you can't accomplish this, then you have absolutely NO business building a computer in the 1st place, IMHO
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#25
Tomorrow
bonehead123
Pea drop in the center....

'nuff said :)

If you can't accomplish this, then you have absolutely NO business building a computer in the 1st place, IMHO
Depends on the CPU. This logic might have been good years ago but today in addition to AM4 where chiplet might be in the corner instead of middle and LGA1151 (soon LGA1200) we also have Threadripper etc where using this method would yield bad results. Gamers Nexus tested this years ago. Even their modmat has patterns for best spread printed on it.
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