Tuesday, August 11th 2020

TechPowerUp ThrottleStop 9.2 Released

TechPowerUp has today released an update to widely popular ThrottleStop software made by Kevin Glynn. Used as a tool to "monitor for and correct the three main types of CPU throttling", the new ThrottleStop software received a major update that brings a heap of new features and improvements. Starting off, one of the biggest changes in the new version 9.2, is that the tool finally restores Windows 7 compatibility, which was unavailable for that OS in the previous version 9.0. Now, the tool also brings a few more options to the table like a new TS Bench feature that allows for random MHz testing, adds support for devices that use connected standby, and fixes base clock MHz reporting when using Core Isolation.

DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp ThrottleStop 9.2
TechPowerUp ThrottleStop 9.2
The change-log follows.

  • Added access to the default Windows power options.
  • Restored Windows 7 compatibility.
  • Fixed C0% reporting 0.0 for all threads on some CPUs.
  • Updated TS Bench test with random MHz option.
  • Fixed BCLK MHz reporting when using Core Isolation.
  • Added support for devices that use connected standby.
  • Added reporting of suspend / resume times to the log file.
  • Removed auto BCLK updates when resuming.
  • Fixed GDI handle leak.
  • New color and font options.
  • New black notification area icon option.
  • New option to remove the title bar.
  • Removed PROCHOT indicator box.
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7 Comments on TechPowerUp ThrottleStop 9.2 Released

#1
Assimilator
@unclewebb I'd be interested to know what happened to Win7 compat in the previous version. Did you remove it because that OS is dead, or was there a technical issue?
Posted on Reply
#2
AOne
I was really hoping to see the stretched stats windows, showing all 16 threads at once, but whatever. Still a program I can't live without :) Hope it will be available in some of the next updates.
BTW, as the PROCHOT thick is removed, how does it show max temp was reached - changing colors like in the Limit box?
Posted on Reply
#3
HugsNotDrugs
Is this a TPU program? Or open source and updated by TPU?

The PROCHOT setting is wonderful as it disables unduly low temp throttling by the likes of Lenovo.
Posted on Reply
#4
unclewebb
RealTemp Author
Assimilator
I'd be interested to know what happened to Win7 compat
ThrottleStop 9.0 was fine on Windows 7. The problem happened when I released ThrottleStop 9.1. This was a limited release that accidentally broke Windows 7 compatibility. Modern standby (connected standby) is only available in Windows 8 and newer. When I added a new feature to ThrottleStop to detect modern standby, Windows 7 was not happy. Based on user feedback, I was able to rewrite some code to keep Windows 7, 8 and 10 all happy. I no longer have access to any hardware running Windows 7 so bugs like this can happen without me noticing.
AOne
I was really hoping to see the stretched stats windows
A stretched version that shows all 12 threads is still on the things to maybe do list. If I had a laptop with an 8750H or 9750H or similar, I would be more motivated. Maybe I need to set up a GoFundMe page for future ThrottleStop development. Trust me. Most of the money would go to a good cause. :D
HugsNotDrugs
Is this a TPU program?
Not really.

TechPowerUp's servers have been an extremely reliable host for my freeware programming projects during the last 10+ years. I added the TechPowerUp logo to ThrottleStop to show my appreciation. It is also nice having the ThrottleStop.exe file signed by TechPowerUp. It makes it look like a legit piece of software and helps keep the antivirus programs happy. When you download ThrottleStop from TechPowerUp, you can be sure that you are getting an unmolested version.
HugsNotDrugs
The PROCHOT setting is wonderful
Being able to lock the PROCHOT Offset value is going to make a lot of Lenovo owners happy. When Intel first introduced this adjustable PROCHOT (thermal throttling) temperature, it could only be lowered by 15°C. Intel's latest CPUs allow manufacturers to reduce the thermal throttling temperature by as much as 63°C. It did not take long for one manufacturer to start abusing this feature. Imagine a laptop that can start thermal throttling at 37°C (100°C - 63°C). Intel has given manufacturers way too much control over this.

It makes Intel and Lenovo both look bad when Lenovo starts dropping the thermal throttling temperature to ridiculously low temperatures on many of their laptops. Not just low end laptops either. Some very pricey business class laptops also have this feature. Whenever they need someone to testify at a future class action lawsuit, they can count me in.
Posted on Reply
#5
Berfs1
See, this is the kind of developer I like. A developer that not listens to user feedback, but also helps the community with using it. Take notes developers ;)
unclewebb
Being able to lock the PROCHOT Offset value is going to make a lot of Lenovo owners happy. When Intel first introduced this adjustable PROCHOT (thermal throttling) temperature, it could only be lowered by 15°C. Intel's latest CPUs allow manufacturers to reduce the thermal throttling temperature by as much as 63°C. It did not take long for one manufacturer to start abusing this feature. Imagine a laptop that can start thermal throttling at 37°C (100°C - 63°C). Intel has given manufacturers way too much control over this.

It makes Intel and Lenovo both look bad when Lenovo starts dropping the thermal throttling temperature to ridiculously low temperatures on many of their laptops. Not just low end laptops either. Some very pricey business class laptops also have this feature. Whenever they need someone to testify at a future class action lawsuit, they can count me in.
Assuming there was no malicious intent behind this, I would suspect their reasoning has to do with lowering power leakage at both idle and under load, because the lower the temperatures, the higher the efficiency. While it may not seem like much at first glance, it does improve the battery usage a bit. I'm just trying to find a way to prove how it can be useful to have a lower PROCHOT temperature. Not that I agree with it for most people, actually I would do that in my laptop so that my CPU does not go over 62°C on battery, so that the fans don't kick on. They are off until the CPU hits 63°C, so it would be helpful in addition to my undervolt and tuning, to have a hard temperature limit to enforce throttling. I know I am not like most users, but I would rather have my fans not kick on at all while on battery, just so that I can brag about having a fanless laptop :)
Posted on Reply
#6
AOne
A stretched version that shows all 12 threads is still on the things to maybe do list. If I had a laptop with an 8750H or 9750H or similar, I would be more motivated. Maybe I need to set up a GoFundMe page for future ThrottleStop development. Trust me. Most of the money would go to a good cause. :D
Don't even hesitate. I'd be more than happy to participate. This program is a lifesaver, so there should definitely be an option for support and funding.
Posted on Reply
#7
lexluthermiester
unclewebb
I no longer have access to any hardware running Windows 7 so bugs like this can happen without me noticing.
It might be a good idea to get yourself an inexpensive Acer, Dell or HP system to test Windows 7 with until that OS popularity diminishes below 8% market share. A system like a Dell Optiplex or Precision with an unlocked CPU and several inexpensive SSD's/HDD's(one for each OS being tested) would make testing easy for you.
unclewebb
A stretched version that shows all 12 threads is still on the things to maybe do list. If I had a laptop with an 8750H or 9750H or similar, I would be more motivated. Maybe I need to set up a GoFundMe page for future ThrottleStop development. Trust me. Most of the money would go to a good cause. :D
Good idea! A desktop with a 6core i7 or Xeon would also be helpful, unless you are trying to save space...
Posted on Reply