Tuesday, October 27th 2020

ID-COOLING Releases SE-225-XT BLACK CPU Air Cooler

ID-COOLING today announced the SE-225-XT BLACK CPU air cooler, featuring 5 HDT V3.0 copper heatpipes, dual 120 mm PWM fans and metal-mecha mounting kit for Intel LGA2066/2011/1200/115X and AMD AM4. This cooler is designed to cool those processors with a TDP under 220 W with 5 newly developed HDT V3.0 heatpipes and a solid built aluminium heatsink. Overall dimension is 128x108x154mm to fit all ATX platforms.

Two 120x120x25mm fans have been included to get a push-pull configuration. Rubber dampeners have been pre-attached to all corners of both sides. With PWM function, both fans will run at 700 to 1800rpm while pushing 76.16CFM air at maximum speed with noise level measured at 15.2 to 35.2 dB. The bundled thermal grease is named ID-TG25, which has a thermal conductivity of 10.5 W/m-K. The SE-225-XT BLACK CPU Air Cooler will be available for 42.99 USD / 39.99 EURO from Late Nov - Early Dec 2020.
Source: ID-COOLING
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14 Comments on ID-COOLING Releases SE-225-XT BLACK CPU Air Cooler

#2
Owen1982
Possibly stupid question - if you paint your CPU heatsink black doesn't it attract heat to the heatsink and therefore increase your CPU temps? Maybe the difference is negligible and it's nothing to worry about - but 'every little helps'?
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#3
ExcuseMeWtf
No RGB - now that's actually newsworthy nowadays!

No /s
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#4
Vya Domus
Owen1982
Possibly stupid question - if you paint your CPU heatsink black doesn't it attract heat to the heatsink and therefore increase your CPU temps? Maybe the difference is negligible and it's nothing to worry about - but 'every little helps'?
It doesn't attract heat, electromagnetic radiation hits the heatsink no matter what color it is. The reason something is black is because most of the energy carried by the wavelengths which are in the visible spectrum get absorbed by the material.

Anyway, the point is that the only kind of radiation that carries any significant amount of heat is infrared and well, it doesn't actually carry that much heat. (It doesn't actually carry "heat" it carries energy)
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#5
mahirzukic2
Owen1982
Possibly stupid question - if you paint your CPU heatsink black doesn't it attract heat to the heatsink and therefore increase your CPU temps? Maybe the difference is negligible and it's nothing to worry about - but 'every little helps'?
I can tell you that it's pretty much negligible and that a certain color is just for cosmetics effect.
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#6
Lnxepique
Vya Domus
It doesn't attract heat, electromagnetic radiation hits the heatsink no matter what color it is. The reason something is black is because most of the energy carried by the wavelengths which are in the visible spectrum get absorbed by the material.

Anyway, the point is that the only kind of radiation that carries any significant amount of heat is infrared and well, it doesn't actually carry that much heat. (It doesn't actually carry "heat" it carries energy)
A simple UV blocking foil, usually used on the glass of store windows, should eliminate this... (we are talking about a case with tempered glass, right? lol)

Only the thickness of the black coating will add to heat building up at that point, which should be within a margin of 1C...
Posted on Reply
#7
bonehead123
Colors (as in paint or other methods) themselves don't attract heat on their own, unless they contain some type of conductive substance, they can either absorb it or reflect it, or some combination thereof....

Which is why, in simple terms, a black material that is exposed to an energy source (sunlight/radiation/heat etc) feels a bit hotter on the surface than a white one :)
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#8
Chrispy_
DeathtoGnomes
i see no mention of it clearing mem slots.
That looks like it doesn't, and it's only a problem if you use silly RGBLED memory. It's the same design as my ancient NH-U12 and that clears most non-RGBELD RAM.

For €40 that's a lot of cooler for the money, but I think the biggest issue here will be how well it copes with direct-contact heatpipes instead of a solid copper base.
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#9
Caring1
Chrispy_
That looks like it doesn't, and it's only a problem if you use silly RGBLED memory. It's the same design as my ancient NH-U12 and that clears most non-RGBELD RAM.
Their website shows the fans sitting next to the Ram, not over them.
Posted on Reply
#10
Chrispy_
Caring1
Their website shows the fans sitting next to the Ram, not over them.
Those images show it almost touching the DIMM in the second slot though. Like my old Noctua with no sweepback in the heatpipes, the fan will block the first slot, and I've found that to be true on every single board I've ever used this Noctua on, and that's probably 10+ boards at this point.



There are multiple workarounds though:
  1. Don't buy stupid RAM in the first place
  2. Just run two sticks if you have stupid RAM.
  3. Use a single fan in pull configuration - it's not quite as good but you don't lose too much performance and it is at least quieter.
  4. Move the front fan up a couple of fins on the heatsink - regular wire clips allow a huge amount of flexibility in fan positioning (this is what I do with my slightly stupid RAM)
  5. Buy a flagship motherboard that is wider than regular ATX and spaces out the socket a bit more.
Posted on Reply
#11
micropage7
actually it looks pretty good, and basic where like you can change the fans if needed without any worries about how install it
no RGB, for some it's bad but for some it's good since RGB effect everywhere, except maybe the magic jar
Posted on Reply
#12
mahirzukic2
Chrispy_
Those images show it almost touching the DIMM in the second slot though. Like my old Noctua with no sweepback in the heatpipes, the fan will block the first slot, and I've found that to be true on every single board I've ever used this Noctua on, and that's probably 10+ boards at this point.



There are multiple workarounds though:
  1. Don't buy stupid RAM in the first place
  2. Just run two sticks if you have stupid RAM.
  3. Use a single fan in pull configuration - it's not quite as good but you don't lose too much performance and it is at least quieter.
  4. Move the front fan up a couple of fins on the heatsink - regular wire clips allow a huge amount of flexibility in fan positioning (this is what I do with my slightly stupid RAM)
  5. Buy a flagship motherboard that is wider than regular ATX and spaces out the socket a bit more.

I also used to do #4 my self with Scythe Mugen 2 (which I still have on the PC :D)
Posted on Reply
#13
Caring1
Chrispy_
Those images show it almost touching the DIMM in the second slot though. Like my old Noctua with no sweepback in the heatpipes, the fan will block the first slot, and I've found that to be true on every single board I've ever used this Noctua on, and that's probably 10+ boards at this point.



There are multiple workarounds though:
  1. Don't buy stupid RAM in the first place
  2. Just run two sticks if you have stupid RAM.
  3. Use a single fan in pull configuration - it's not quite as good but you don't lose too much performance and it is at least quieter.
  4. Move the front fan up a couple of fins on the heatsink - regular wire clips allow a huge amount of flexibility in fan positioning (this is what I do with my slightly stupid RAM)
  5. Buy a flagship motherboard that is wider than regular ATX and spaces out the socket a bit more.

Looking at the position of the mounting screw under the fans, it doesn't look like it is possible to lift the fan slightly to even use the first Dimm slot.
Posted on Reply
#14
s3thra
DeathtoGnomes
i see no mention of it clearing mem slots.
This is why I like the Cryorig units; they angle the heatpipes so the whole thing sits away from the RAM area.

For example, their H7 model which I have:

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