Wednesday, April 7th 2021

Gigabyte Preparing Passively Cooled AMD X570S Motherboards

AMD introduced their X570 chipset back in July 2019 to coincide with the launch of Ryzen 3000 processors. The X570 chipset consumed more power than previous chipsets and required a dedicated cooling fan on most boards which were often noisy or unreliable. AMD appears to be preparing an updated more efficient X570S silent chipset with passive cooling. Gigabyte has recently submitted eight new motherboards to the EEC which appear to feature the new chipset. The specific models submitted include the AORUS MASTER, AORUS ELITE AX, AORUS ELITE, AORUS PRO AX, AERO G, and GAMING X. It remains to be seen if all of these models make it to market and whether or not other manufacturers are preparing new boards.
Source: Videocardz
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45 Comments on Gigabyte Preparing Passively Cooled AMD X570S Motherboards

#26
Makaveli
night.fox
Isnt there is a couple that I know x570 which are passively cooled? The overpriced Giga x570 aorus xtreme and Asus dark hero. But very well
yes but these are $500+ motherboards.

I spent around $300 on mine I wouldn't spend an extra $200 just for a passive heatsink but that is me.
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#27
R0H1T
Dark hero isn't really that expensive, around 400 USD for the most part.
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#28
Makaveli
R0H1T
Dark hero isn't really that expensive, around 400 USD for the most part.
Depends on location.

In Canada that board cost $529
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#29
5 o'clock Charlie
Dammeron
It is fine, but not good enough. No usb c front header, no wifi, mediocre VRM and it's cooling...



I still don't get why mATX didn't become the mainstream. Most of the people will be fine even with ITX boards (they just need 1 slot for GPU and nothing more), a few of them would need an additional slot for eg. a sound card and again - mATX will be more than enough... And yet we're stuck with a "relic of a past" standard (when each function of a PC had to be added by an expension card - sound, LAN, GPU acceleration...) that just takes more space and giving no profit in return.
The lack of popularity of mATX may have to do based on demand. There has been always a higher demand for ATX over mATX boards, especially in the DIY market, which is why motherboard manufacturers focus on that size. I am unsure if today's OEMs still use many MATX boards in their desktop builds like it was a decade ago or so.
I share your same thoughts about mATX, which I like that size option. I went from a z77 Asus Maximus V Gene to a MSI B550m Mortar (non-WIFI). It is a great board that satisfies my needs. Buildzoid did a power summary of the board, which he explained has a great VRM. The ASRock X750M Pro4 has a weaker VRM and other issues that I have researched, which I avoided. Instead, I waited for a long time until B550 offerings started being released to the market. The only downside to the B550 is the chipset limitations itself, such as the second m.2 slot is pcie gen3 instead of gen4, which the x570 does not have this limitation. For most people's needs, pcie gen 3 for m.2 nvme drives is enough. One would think mATX would gain popularity as integrated devices (e.g. audio, networking, etc) have gone a long way over the years, thus the lesser need for pci/pcie slots.
If you are still looking for a decent mATX for AM4, check out the MSI B550m Mortar board if you have not already. It does have usb c on the rear i/o, usb 3.2 gen2 header, wifi option and a great VRM. I am unsure what other requirements you are looking in a board, but I wish you luck in your pursuit. If you have any questions about the Mortar board, feel free to PM me.
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#30
shadow3401
A step in the right direction. The only reason I avoided an X570 motherboard for my last build was because of the active cooling on it. But will the X570 chipset last much longer? given how we know AM5 and DDR5 are coming really soon - could be a case of too little too late.
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#31
R0H1T
shadow3401
given how we know AM5 and DDR5 are coming really soon
Where or how? I know DDR5 isn't becoming mainstream or cheap this year, in fact DDR4 will likely come down in price probably one last time later in the year, than AM5 being launched (only) with DDR5. Of course DDR4+DDR5 support on zen4 could also be a possibility, but I don't see AM5 replacing AM4 for the mainstream users anytime soon.
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#32
Makaveli
AM5 + DDR5 + PCIe 5.0 should all be Zen 4 sometime in Q1 2022.

And everyone buying will be paying the early adopter fee for a new socket + DDR5 memory which will not be cheap on launch.
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#33
JMccovery
R0H1T
Dark hero isn't really that expensive, around 400 USD for the most part.
I dunno about $400... Amazon is showing $540 - $930
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#34
night.fox
Chrispy_
When mine dies I'm just going to bin it and dump one of these on there using thermal epoxy:
www.amazon.com/uxcell-Black-Aluminum-Radiator-Heatsink/dp/B00RE6KB3Y



They were super-expensive boards though. I wasn't paying an extra $/£/€500 just to get fanless chipset cooling.
Oh yeah, you mentioned they were overpriced. I just didn't realise *how* overpriced they were until I just looked it up.
Makaveli
yes but these are $500+ motherboards.

I spent around $300 on mine I wouldn't spend an extra $200 just for a passive heatsink but that is me.
Yep I do agree. At some point Asus and Gigabyte marked up their board price to somewhat say "passive" cooling on their chipset. Why cant they just make a passive cooling for all their x570 chipset. I am very sure that alot of people must have RMA their x570 board because of chipset fan noise, or fan failing.

I hope that my chipset fan wont fail. So far is doing ok. Not so noisy and so
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#35
Makaveli
night.fox
I am very sure that alot of people must have RMA their x570 board because of chipset fan noise, or fan failing.

I hope that my chipset fan wont fail. So far is doing ok. Not so noisy and so
I would like to see the numbers for RMA's for chipset fan noise and fan failing remember these board have only been out for almost 2 years. These aren't motherboards and chipset fans from the 90s!
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#36
night.fox
Makaveli
I would like to see the numbers for RMA's for chipset fan noise and fan failing remember these board have only been out for almost 2 years. These aren't motherboards and chipset fans from the 90s!
sure, let me just call up my secretary...

Geezz man, my point is, price for passive cooling solution might be cheaper in the long run, than a failing fan or costumer returning due to noise
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#37
Makaveli
night.fox
sure, let me just call up my secretary...

Geezz man, my point is, price for passive cooling solution might be cheaper in the long run, than a failing fan or costumer returning due to noise
That is my point everyone talking about chipset fan failures nobody has any numbers to back up these claims its all just hear say.These boards are not old enough for fan failures to be an issue. Then most of the complaints I see from this are from people not even on the AM4 platform.
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#38
Caring1
Makaveli
That is my point everyone talking about chipset fan failures nobody has any numbers to back up these claims its all just hear say.These boards are not old enough for fan failures to be an issue. Then most of the complaints I see from this are from people not even on the AM4 platform.
Only chipset fan failure I had was on an old Z77 Extreme 11, and it's not like the fan totally died, I just needed to physically kick start it and it ran silently, it's just that it didn't like starting by itself. :laugh:
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#39
night.fox
Makaveli
That is my point everyone talking about chipset fan failures nobody has any numbers to back up these claims its all just hear say.These boards are not old enough for fan failures to be an issue. Then most of the complaints I see from this are from people not even on the AM4 platform.
are you working with some board manufacturers or something? You keep defending a chipset fan wherein long run, passive coolers is always better than with something mechanical. Fans will eventually dry up and fail at some point. I saw some youtube videos showing high pitch high rev chipset fans. And you will not experience this when it is passively cooled. it may not happen soon but it will bound to someday
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#40
Makaveli
night.fox
are you working with some board manufacturers or something? You keep defending a chipset fan wherein long run, passive coolers is always better than with something mechanical. Fans will eventually dry up and fail at some point. I saw some youtube videos showing high pitch high rev chipset fans. And you will not experience this when it is passively cooled. it may not happen soon but it will bound to someday
All in due time, we will find out in the next couple years if everyone on X570 has fan failures. And I understand mechanical parts fail in time, however I think people are making a far bigger deal about this than they need to. Complaining for the sake of complaining with no actual evidence of all these failures.
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#41
MikeMurphy
Jism
Lots of misinformation about the 570 chipset. It only consumes more when you attach 2 NVME ssd's on it, since the power delivery with the 570 is through the chipset. In a normal situation like 1 nvme ssd it does'nt require the fan to spinup at all.

The refresh is coming from TSMC obviously, which results in a bit lower power consumption.
This is correct. My x570 MAG Tomahawk doesn't spin up at all as I'm running SATA drives, and FWIW a PCIe 3.0 GPU.
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#42
Chrispy_
Makaveli
That is my point everyone talking about chipset fan failures nobody has any numbers to back up these claims its all just hear say.These boards are not old enough for fan failures to be an issue. Then most of the complaints I see from this are from people not even on the AM4 platform.
I and I suspect many others were around almost 20 years ago when all Nforce2 motherboards required chipset fans. MSI, Gigabyte, Asus, Abit, Soyo - they ALL FAILED, no exceptions - some in as little as 6 months which is why the Asus A7N8X and DFI NFII boards were so desirable - they used oversized passive northbridge chipset coolers that caused clearance issues with some CPU coolers but were worth it for the hassle of never having to worry about the stupid chipset fan any more.

That was the era when the industry learned about capacitor failures and chipset fans, which is why polymer caps and fanless chipset heatsinks were such hot selling points for the decade after that. Like all good lessons, they are forgotten in time so that history may repeat itself :\
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#43
Makaveli
Chrispy_
I and I suspect many others were around almost 20 years ago when all Nforce2 motherboards required chipset fans. MSI, Gigabyte, Asus, Abit, Soyo - they ALL FAILED, no exceptions - some in as little as 6 months which is why the Asus A7N8X and DFI NFII boards were so desirable - they used oversized passive northbridge chipset coolers that caused clearance issues with some CPU coolers but were worth it for the hassle of never having to worry about the stupid chipset fan any more.

That was the era when the industry learned about capacitor failures and chipset fans, which is why polymer caps and fanless chipset heatsinks were such hot selling points for the decade after that. Like all good lessons, they are forgotten in time so that history may repeat itself :\
I still have a Asus A8n32-SLI board retired now but still runs with an socket 939 Operton 170 in it. I was using it for HTPC duty up until a year go.

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#44
MikeMurphy
Chrispy_
I and I suspect many others were around almost 20 years ago when all Nforce2 motherboards required chipset fans. MSI, Gigabyte, Asus, Abit, Soyo - they ALL FAILED, no exceptions - some in as little as 6 months which is why the Asus A7N8X and DFI NFII boards were so desirable - they used oversized passive northbridge chipset coolers that caused clearance issues with some CPU coolers but were worth it for the hassle of never having to worry about the stupid chipset fan any more.

That was the era when the industry learned about capacitor failures and chipset fans, which is why polymer caps and fanless chipset heatsinks were such hot selling points for the decade after that. Like all good lessons, they are forgotten in time so that history may repeat itself :\
The X570 chipset heat couldn't have been avoided, nor do the nearby expansion slots allow for much cooling. I don't think it's about not learning lessons but rather dealing with technological and design limitations.
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#45
Chrispy_
MikeMurphy
The X570 chipset heat couldn't have been avoided, nor do the nearby expansion slots allow for much cooling. I don't think it's about not learning lessons but rather dealing with technological and design limitations.
The expansion slots limit the size of the cooler you can put on the X570 chipset, but that's a problem the industry solved at extremely low cost several decades ago.



The cost of a heatpipe to carry the paltry 17W of the X570 chipset to around the CPU socket where there's plenty of room is about $0.80, according to Gamers Nexus factory tours. Google "Nforce2 heatpipe" for dozens of designs.
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