Wednesday, April 14th 2021

Oculus Quest 2 Update Brings 120 Hz Support, Wireless PC streaming, Office Mode

Today we're announcing features that will begin rolling out soon in the v28 software update to Oculus Quest headsets. Oculus Air Link is a wireless way to play PC VR games on Quest 2, while new Infinite Office features make getting work done in VR even easier. We're also announcing native 120 Hz support for Quest 2 for an ultra-smooth gameplay experience.

Since launching in 2019 and exiting beta last year, Oculus Link has been a widely used feature across the Quest Platform. With a gaming PC and a compatible USB-C cable, Link has given people access to Rift's impressive content library, including games like Asgard's Wrath, Lone Echo, Stormland, and more. But of course, being tethered to your PC can break immersion and limit your mobility. We know gamers want to use Link without a wire—to experience the full freedom of movement offered by Quest 2 while playing the high-end titles that can only run on a gaming PC. That's why we've been working on a new streaming technology called Oculus Air Link—a completely wireless way to play PC VR content on Quest 2 using WiFi, built on the successful Oculus Link streaming pipeline.
Air Link

Air Link will ship in Experimental mode on Quest 2, and we're excited to hear the community's feedback while Air Link is in early development.

Air Link gives people more options for accessing PC VR games on Quest 2. Oculus Link cables will still provide a robust and consistent experience, while those with a strong WiFi setup can choose to stream wirelessly through Air Link. If you want to charge your headset during your VR exploits, experience the highest-fidelity visuals possible, or if your available WiFi network is congested or unsecured, Link via USB-C cable is the way to go. If you have a strong and secure WiFi network and if your playspace is ideally within roughly 20 feet of your WiFi router, Air Link will be a good option.

While Air Link is an Experimental feature, not every network and PC setup will be ideal. We recommend following the guidelines we've provided to ensure the best experience, including: Only use Air Link on a secure WiFi network that you trust; use a 5Ghz network on an AC or AX router, connected via ethernet cable to your PC; and make sure your PC meets the Oculus Link requirements.

Here's how to get started with Air Link once it rolls out: First, download and install the Oculus PC app if you haven't already. You'll need PC software v28, which is rolling out soon. Next, navigate to Settings → Beta in the PC app and enable the Air Link toggle. Then, put on your Quest 2 headset, navigate to Settings → Experimental, and enable Air Link. To disable Air Link and go back to using Link with a USB-C cable, you'll need to disable Air Link from the Experimental panel.

We'll work to improve Air Link over time, including performance, visual quality, and the ability to run in less than ideal wireless scenarios. We look forward to hearing the community's feedback while Air Link is in Experimental mode.

Infinite Office

At Facebook Connect, we announced Infinite Office—a collection of new features built into Oculus Home, designed to make working in VR feel more productive and flexible. In January, we rolled out the ability to find and use your Bluetooth-enabled mouse or trackpad while in VR. Today, we're announcing two more great new features in the Infinite Office suite: physical surface integration and the ability to track your physical keyboard.

Bring Your Desk Into VR

Being able to interact with parts of the real world can help you feel safe, immersed, and more comfortable in VR. Launching as an experimental feature on the Quest Platform, you'll be able to place a virtual desk on your real furniture so you can see and use it while in your Home environment. With this feature, you can use your desk as a separate seated area to access work tools like Browser. In addition to integrating with your real environment, your virtual desk boundary is automatically saved and detected, letting you easily pick things up right where you left off.

Pair Your Physical Keyboard with Your Quest 2 for Better Input

At Facebook Connect, we announced a partnership with Logitech to bring a physical keyboard into VR, beginning with the Logitech K830. Soon, you'll be able to type as effectively in VR as you do in the real world with Bluetooth-enabled keyboard tracking. With this experimental feature, you'll be able to comfortably sit at your physical desk at home, pair your Logitech K830 keyboard to your Quest 2, and view a 3D representation of your hands and keyboard within VR for easy text entry and system navigation while in your Home environment. For an optimal in-VR experience, we recommend placing the keyboard on a flat and light-colored surface in a well-lit area. We'll expand support for additional keyboards in the future.

You'll be able to enable your virtual desk and pair your keyboard via Bluetooth Pairing through the Experimental Features panel in your Settings. To use your keyboard in VR, tracking will need to be turned on, which you can do by putting on your headset, navigating to Settings → Device, and enabling the Tracking toggle.

120 Hz Support

With its increased graphics processing power and new display, Quest 2 is capable of supporting high frame rates that deliver an ultra-smooth gameplay experience. Quest 2 currently runs at 90 Hz by default in system software like the Home environment, Explore, the Store, Oculus Browser, and Oculus TV. Last year, we also opened up 90 Hz support across the entire platform, letting developers start shipping titles with native 90 Hz support on Quest 2. Many apps including Echo VR, Red Matter, Vacation Simulator, Racket: Nx, Eleven Table Tennis, and Down the Rabbit Hole have already shipped 90 Hz updates.

Now, we're giving gamers and developers even more choice to push smooth gameplay to the next level with the option to enable a 120 Hz display refresh rate on Quest 2. Developers can soon begin to ship apps on the Oculus Store that run at 120 Hz natively, while Quest 2 users will be able to opt into the 120 Hz option via a toggle in the Experimental panel to experience these applications at higher frame rates. While there aren't any apps that support 120 Hz just yet, people who turn on this setting will experience 120 Hz performance in apps that choose to support it in the future. Meanwhile, Quest 2 system software will remain at 90 Hz. Oculus Link support for 120 Hz will come in a future release.

Our goal is to continue unlocking new capabilities of the Quest 2 hardware. We expect 120 Hz and 90 Hz support to provide the most benefit for games that rely on fast-twitch, rapid-style movement while for many other apps, 72 Hz mode will continue to be a great option for a smooth and comfortable experience.
Source: Oculus
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22 Comments on Oculus Quest 2 Update Brings 120 Hz Support, Wireless PC streaming, Office Mode

#1
BArms
I hope valve slashes the index price in the near future. I want to get a VR headset but I'm never, ever, ever going to buy one that requires a facebook account and I haven't been able to justify $1k for the index.
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#2
FYFI13
So interesting news, to those 0.2% of gamers... I wish devs put their time and efforts into gaming on Linux instead.
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#3
xkm1948
This is truly amazing! I might get a second Quest2 and use it at work!
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#4
euricog
Mandatory Facebook account... That thing could have a quantum processor and make me pancakes for breakfast and still would be a big NOPE!
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#5
Mussels
Moderprator
i'm salty i chose the rift S now, it's been getting no love
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#6
Chrispy_
Wireless and 120Hz is how the original Quest should have been.

Zuckerberg can f*** off though. After playing with the Quest at work, it's pretty damn apparent that Oculus should never have been sold to FB. Our hopes and dreams rest with Valve now, because Microsoft have essentially abandoned Windows Mixed Reality. That cliff house is an unwelcome, poorly-conceived, outdated, and mandatory nuisance; Using a WMR headset is an unfortunate example of Microsoft getting in the way of SteamVR. Updates to Windows constantly reset your saved "bypass the stupid cliff house" configurations and it's like the biannual default apps reverting to Microsoft's browser/player/viewer/mail clients without your consent.
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#7
RedelZaVedno
Chrispy_
Wireless and 120Hz is how the original Quest should have been.

Zuckerberg can f*** off though. After playing with the Quest at work, it's pretty damn apparent that Oculus should never have been sold to FB. Our hopes and dreams rest with Valve now, because Microsoft have essentially abandoned Windows Mixed Reality. That cliff house is an unwelcome, poorly-conceived, outdated, and mandatory nuisance; Using a WMR headset is an unfortunate example of Microsoft getting in the way of SteamVR. Updates to Windows constantly reset your saved "bypass the stupid cliff house" configurations and it's like the biannual default apps reverting to Microsoft's browser/player/viewer/mail clients without your consent.
Yeah Microsoft doesn't show much love to WMR, but I must say VR settings and drivers have gotten better since MS Flight simulator got VR support. Probably because of Asobo pressure on MS. With that being said I had Index and sold it a moment I tried HP Reverb G2. Disregarding controllers and smaller FOV, G2 is much better headset than Index and costs 400 bucks less. I wish we could get Oculus like software VR environment and controllers, Index' tracking, G2 screens quality/comfort/weight and Pimax' FOV in one VR HMD costing south of $1K. That would transform a lot of VR disbelievers into VR lovers. Something like StarVR One's 210H 130V FOV and higher res 2*2560x2160p OLED screens (so that 3080/6800XT can still handle it), would give us out of this world gaming experience.
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#8
LifeOnMars
Mussels
i'm salty i chose the rift S now, it's been getting no love
Me too, still enjoying the experience though even if VR has been a bit quieter recently.
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#9
Mussels
Moderprator
LifeOnMars
Me too, still enjoying the experience though even if VR has been a bit quieter recently.
when i'm physically capable (medical shit) i love the rift S and stabbing people with it

but obviously, i'd love a wireless version even more
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#10
Punkenjoy
I was already enjoying the Wireless 90 Hz gameplay experience with the help of Virtual Desktop but the setup was not super user friendly for the masses. I am glad that they make it easier ! 90 Hz is good enough that i don't have motion sickness but more is always better. I tried before using a Link cable and the experience i think suck. I hate having a cable when you can't see anything. Wireless is really the way to go with VR.

Even more when you think that originally, it was 72hz. I know it suck to have to link it with Facebook but in the end but hey, already having a steam account, an epic account, an EA account, An Ubisoft account, an Google account, an microsoft account, etc...

But it still would like to see the coming of a universal non-company-linked Identity provider that you could use to access all other services and that would give you the ability to choose what you share really. But i doubt that it's coming.
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#11
Vanny
Mussels
i'm salty i chose the rift S now, it's been getting no love
Me too, but the VR experiences I had were still fantastic, so whatever. At least I have a headset now. Not gonna spend $1k on an Index, or $100 on an Oculus Link cable.
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#12
Franzen4Real
Mussels
but obviously, i'd love a wireless version even more
We VR enthusiasts often talk about wanting higher res, wider fov, etc. but in my opinion, going wireless is the true game changer. I've been running Virtual Desktop with my Quest 2, so I'm definitely looking forward to Air Link if it also supports the 120hz mode. It doesn't seem like a cable would be that big of deal if you cant physically feel it, but as you're well aware there is always a thought in the back of your mind while playing that you have to be careful of it. Once you go wireless and no longer have to think about, it adds so much to the immersion.
Alexa
Me too, but the VR experiences I had were still fantastic, so whatever. At least I have a headset now. Not gonna spend $1k on an Index, or $100 on an Oculus Link cable.
If you were to pick up a Q2, at this point there is zero reason to go with a link cable. The wireless solution at the moment (virtual desktop) is both cheaper and better, and soon Air Link will then make it free. But I certainly understand not wanting to buy yet another hmd when your current one works just fine (I ended up gifting mine when upgrading to Q2 and they love it, so it worked out)
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#13
Vanny
Franzen4Real
If you were to pick up a Q2, at this point there is zero reason to go with a link cable. The wireless solution at the moment (virtual desktop) is both cheaper and better, and soon Air Link will then make it free. But I certainly understand not wanting to buy yet another hmd when your current one works just fine (I ended up gifting mine when upgrading to Q2 and they love it, so it worked out)
I have a PC capable of premium VR gaming. I would like to use my headset on the games that I have on my PC, without spending money on any additional cables or software (the Oculus software is enough bloat as it is). I don't care about wireless.
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#14
HOkay
I'm loving the Q2 + Virtual Desktop experience already, bumping to 120Hz is great news! It makes such a difference being wireless since I don't have a dedicated play space indoors because UK houses are too bloody small. So I've got a WiFi AP in my garage which is cabled back to my router & it's fantastic. Sure, needing a Facebook account is annoying, but why does it matter? Just setup an account & add minimal info into it. Personally I don't care that Facebook have a map of my garage & know which VR games I like. I'm much more worried they'll randomly decide to block Virtual Desktop now their own solution is coming.

Just a note on VD setup, it's much easier now since they allowed the full VD app into the store, now you just install it natively without needing to sideload
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#15
Mussels
Moderprator
the bloat really is an issue, i wish i could use my rift S in a driver only mode....


i wanna play a game only available on steamVR, why do i need to download and install 10GB of oculus software first?
the software even autoloads with windows and bloats the shit out of things
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#16
Chrispy_
Mussels
the bloat really is an issue, i wish i could use my rift S in a driver only mode....


i wanna play a game only available on steamVR, why do i need to download and install 10GB of oculus software first?
the software even autoloads with windows and bloats the shit out of things
Yeah, this is the BS that irks me most about Rifts and WMR headsets.

Give us a DRIVER, not a mandatory, unskippable bloatware experience.
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#17
Vanny
Mussels
the software even autoloads with windows and bloats the shit out of things
That's why I keep the service on manual and only start it when I want to play VR. Ofc, I shouldn't need to be doing this in the first place.
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#18
WhiteNoise
The Rift S is awesome!! but yeah wireless is sweet. They announced awhile back that the Rift is being discontinued in favor of the quest and wireless so I'm cool with that. They will still support the Rift.
What i like about Oculus is they don't charge $1k for their headset.


having a FB account is no big deal either. You just need an account, you don't have to use it. I have a facebook account and never log in.
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#19
Octavean
It's put your money where your mouth is time for me.

I have an Oculus Rift CV1 and Oculus Quest v1. I said I would buy the Oculus Quest 2 if they supported 120Hz and Wireless so its now a viable upgrade IMO. I'm am officially willing to buy but there are other things I want such as an RTX 3070 / 3060 class video card and a PS5. I manage to snag a PS5 order (two actually) from Gamestop so if all goes well I should it (them) by Monday. The RTX series card may be a tough nut to crack so the Oculus Quest 2 is low hanging fruit at this point, as it isn't hard to find at MSRP.

Still my efforts are going to go into the RTX for now.

I'll probably buy the Oculus Quest 2 before the year is out.
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#20
Mussels
Moderprator
I wonder if the wireless has limits, like wired is 120Hz but wireless is 75 or something
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#21
Punkenjoy
Mussels
I wonder if the wireless has limits, like wired is 120Hz but wireless is 75 or something
The limiting factor right now is the quality of your wireless network. It work best when you are in line of sight of your router using 5 GHz AC wifi. Would probably work even better with WiFi6.

It's easier on the quest to decode the video than to render it.
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#22
Mussels
Moderprator
Punkenjoy
The limiting factor right now is the quality of your wireless network. It work best when you are in line of sight of your router using 5 GHz AC wifi. Would probably work even better with WiFi6.

It's easier on the quest to decode the video than to render it.
as someone with 6 wifi AC repeaters in a small house... i think i'd be fine
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