Thursday, April 22nd 2021

Phanteks Also Announces Eclipse P200A ITX Chassis

Phanteks today announced the all-new Mini-ITX addition to the Eclipse lineup, the Eclipse P200A. The P200A features the Ultra-fine Performance Mesh to bring the highest cooling performance combined with a compact yet open interior to offer plenty of space for high-end system components. Featuring Phanteks' Ultra-fine Performance Mesh on the front and side panels, the P200A offers high airflow and optimal cooling performance. With only 1 mm of mesh perforation, the P200A's front panel filters dust without compromising airflow performance.

The P200A internal space and versatility allows for the support of triple-slot graphic cards with optional vertical GPU mounting (PH-CBRSFL15 required), 240/280 mm front and 240 mm side radiators, full ATX power supplies, and massive storage support. This flexibility allows you to configure the internal layout to your exact preference. Building a powerful yet compact ITX system is a breeze thanks to the P200A. Within a 30-liter volume, it combines a compact form-factor with next-gen hardware requirements.

We took a look at this new release today, in our Phanteks P200A Review.
The new P200A will be available in two models, the P200A Performance and P200A D-RGB. The P200A Performance will include 2x 120 mm black PWM fans and a metal Ultra-fine mesh left side panel, while the P200A D-RGB includes 2x 120 mm D-RGB PWM fans, a software-free D-RGB controller, Tempered Glass side panel, and USB-C Gen 2 port.

Availability April 2021.
  • Eclipse P200A Performance—€49.90 / $49.99 / £44.99
  • Eclipse P200A D-RGB—€69.90 / $69.99 / £64.99
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15 Comments on Phanteks Also Announces Eclipse P200A ITX Chassis

#1
MDWiley
I think I remember in Hardware Canucks’ review that you can’t have more than one 240/280mm radiator installed simultaneously. Then again he was sent a prototype, so it seems Phanteks fixed that.
Can’t beat those prices though, especially for the performance model.
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#2
dicktracy
Good to see an ITX case that isn’t using a crappy sandwich design. This looks like a good compromise of size, temp, noise and price.
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#3
toilet pepper
I'm not comfortable with the PSU placement. The top should be open/mesh with so the PSU could get fresh air. Not everyone has an RTX founders edition or a blower type of cooler. That's a lot of concentrated heat the PSU would be dealing with.

This looks like something the NR200 could have been.
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#4
TheLostSwede
toilet pepperI'm not comfortable with the PSU placement. The top should be open/mesh with so the PSU could get fresh air. Not everyone has an RTX founders edition or a blower type of cooler. That's a lot of concentrated heat the PSU would be dealing with.

This looks like something the NR200 could have been.
I guess you're new to computers then? It's where I was for over a decade in all ATX cases.
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#5
Unregistered
TheLostSwedeI guess you're new to computers then? It's where I was for over a decade in all ATX cases.
We're no longer in the times where PSU on top seemed like a good idea (never was, completely idiotic). Top mesh for PSU would've been nice.
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#6
wolar
Why is the USB C turned that way? i can already foresee problems in the future with stuff being blocked by the front panel
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#7
toilet pepper
How can a big company miss something like this. They sent this to reviewers and nobody even saw that? Hardwarecuanucks said they saw this last year.
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#8
TheLostSwede
VannyWe're no longer in the times where PSU on top seemed like a good idea (never was, completely idiotic). Top mesh for PSU would've been nice.
I guess you don't really know why it was done? It was meant to extract the hot air, through the PSU and vent it out the back of the case.
It never really worked that way though and yes, it was not an ideal design, but this is what happens when you have a 100+ companies involved in making a "standard".
It was still vastly better than the AT standard and back then, computers weren't getting all that hot, so it worked just fine back then, until sometime around the Pentium 4 era.
We really need a new desktop PC standard that's better compatible with today's needs, but it doesn't seem very likely to happen.
I mean, even add-in cards are sort of mounted the wrong way for best thermals, so...
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#9
TheinsanegamerN
Dissapointed in the use of an ATX power supply. We have 750 watt SFX units and tons of choices for mini ITX, yet almost none of them use the smaller PSU. I dont need a big PSU brick for a single GPU 99% of the time, it'd be nice to have the choice of a smaller case using smaller components.

Ironically outside of console style cases the only case I know of that uses SFX is the old in win BK 623 chassis.
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#10
tabascosauz
"Within a 30L volume"
"Compact"

:roll:

If you're already going to go big, what's with the idiotic OEM-looking top PSU placement? Seeing as they have a vertical GPU, aesthetics are clearly at least partly in consideration. That near 90° bend for the PSU cables is going to be a pain for anyone who cares enough about aesthetics not to use stock cables.
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#11
Caring1
"This flexibility allows you to configure the internal layout to your exact preference."

So can we move the PSU to the bottom of the case, and the motherboard position up?

Looks like a clone of the CoolerMaster Masterbox series.
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#12
Minus Infinity
Loving my P500A and a baby version makes sense for ITX MB's.
Posted on Reply
#13
billEST
tabascosauz"Within a 30L volume"
"Compact"

:roll:

If you're already going to go big, what's with the idiotic OEM-looking top PSU placement? Seeing as they have a vertical GPU, aesthetics are clearly at least partly in consideration. That near 90° bend for the PSU cables is going to be a pain for anyone who cares enough about aesthetics not to use stock cables.
GREAT post
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#14
dirtyferret
TheLostSwedeI guess you're new to computers then? It's where I was for over a decade in all ATX cases.
decades, and I don't recall seeing a PC over heat just because the PSU was sitting on top. Did you?
TheLostSwedeI guess you don't really know why it was done? It was meant to extract the hot air, through the PSU and vent it out the back of the case.
It never really worked that way though and yes, it was not an ideal design
Given the fact you were lucky back then to even get one case fan with your Compaq special it was a reasonable design and still can be. In that specific Phanteks set up you have two 120"mm fans 10" from the PSU fan. Getting "Fresh air" is not an issue as proven by Darksabre's thermal tests, it offers middle of the pack performance with just two fans.
Posted on Reply
#15
TheLostSwede
dirtyferretdecades, and I don't recall seeing a PC over heat just because the PSU was sitting on top. Did you?



Given the fact you were lucky back then to even get one case fan with your Compaq special it was a reasonable design and still can be. In that specific Phanteks set up you have two 120"mm fans 10" from the PSU fan. Getting "Fresh air" is not an issue as proven by Darksabre's thermal tests, it offers middle of the pack performance with just two fans.
Phone auto correct :oops:
Should read decades and it was...

Never seen a PC overheat because of the PSU placement, final.

It should also be pointed out that passive PSUs were actually a thing even way back then, since a 200W PSU didn't really need all that much cooling.
We also had a bunch of PSUs with an 80 or 90mm fan that were mounted at the rear of the PSU, as it was supposed to help with the cooling.
And there were models with two fans, not as if that helped.

People really forget how much the ATX standard has evolved within the limitations of the standard and what we're using today is quite different from Intel came up with in 1995.
We're on revision 2.2 for motherboards and revision 2.53 for PSUs, assuming Wikipedia is up to date.

Anyhow, PSU placement seems to be the least critical after SSD placement when it comes to overall improved cooling in a system, at least in my experience.
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